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Les Sylphides
Les Sylphides
Les Sylphides
(French: [le silfid]) is a short, non-narrative ballet blanc. Its original choreography was by Michel Fokine, with music by Frédéric Chopin
Frédéric Chopin
orchestrated by Alexander Glazunov. Glazunov had already set some of the music in 1892 as a purely orchestral suite, under the title Chopiniana, Op
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Susan Hendl
New York City
New York City
Ballet (NYCB) is a ballet company founded in 1948 by choreographer George Balanchine[1] and Lincoln Kirstein.[2] Balanchine and Jerome Robbins
Jerome Robbins
are considered the founding choreographers of the company. Léon Barzin was the company's first music director
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Polonaises Op. 40 (Chopin)
The twin Op. 40 Polonaises of the Polonaise
Polonaise
in A major, Op. 40, No. 1 (nicknamed the Military Polonaise) and the Polonaise
Polonaise
in C minor, Op. 40, No. 2 were composed by Frédéric Chopin
Frédéric Chopin
in 1838. Anton Rubinstein
Anton Rubinstein
remarked that the Polonaise
Polonaise
in A major
A major
is the symbol of Polish glory, whilst the Polonaise
Polonaise
in C minor
C minor
is the symbol of Polish tragedy.[1]Contents1 Polonaise
Polonaise
in A major, Op. 40, No. 1 2 Polonaise
Polonaise
in C minor, Op. 40, No. 2 3 References 4 External links Polonaise
Polonaise
in A major, Op. 40, No. 1[edit] Polonaise
Polonaise
Op. 40 No
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Metropolitan Opera
Coordinates: 40°46′22″N 73°59′3″W / 40.77278°N 73.98417°W / 40.77278; -73.98417 Metropolitan Opera
Metropolitan Opera
House at Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, home of the Metropolitan OperaA full house at the old Metropolitan Opera
Metropolitan Opera
House, seen from the rear of the stage, at a concert by pianist Josef Hofmann, November 28, 1937Auditorium of the Metropolitan Opera
Metropolitan Opera
House at Lincoln Center for the Performing ArtsThe gold curtain, a gift of the Metropolitan Opera
Metropolitan Opera
Club, in the auditoriumThe Metropolitan Opera
Metropolitan Opera
is an opera company based in New York City, resident at the Metropolitan Opera
Metropolitan Opera
House at the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts
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Robert Schumann
Robert Schumann[1] (/ˈʃuːmɑːn/;[2] 8 June 1810 – 29 July 1856) was a German composer and an influential music critic. He is widely regarded as one of the greatest composers of the Romantic era. Schumann left the study of law, intending to pursue a career as a virtuoso pianist. He had been assured by his teacher Friedrich Wieck, a German pianist, that he could become the finest pianist in Europe, but a hand injury ended this dream. Schumann then focused his musical energies on composing. Schumann's published compositions were written exclusively for the piano until 1840; he later composed works for piano and orchestra; many Lieder (songs for voice and piano); four symphonies; one opera; and other orchestral, choral, and chamber works. Works such as Carnaval, Symphonic Studies, Kinderszenen, Kreisleriana, and the Fantasie in C are among his most famous
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Papillons
Papillons, Op. 2, is a suite of piano pieces written in 1831 by Robert Schumann. The title means 'butterflies' in French. The work is meant to represent a masked ball and was inspired by the Jean Paul's novel Flegeljahre.[1] The suite begins with a six-measure introduction before launching into a variety of dance-like movements. Each movement is unrelated to the preceding ones, except that the second, A major, theme of the sixth movement recurs in G major in the tenth movement and the theme of the first movement returns in the finale. Eric Jensen notes that the 11th movement is appropriately a polonaise as Vult and Wina speak in her native language, Polish (Jensen 2001, 92-93). This movement starts out by quoting the theme of the traditional Grossvater Tanz (Grandfather's Dance), which was always played at the end of a wedding or similar celebration
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Mazurkas, Op. 50 (Chopin)
The Op. 50 mazurkas by Frédéric Chopin
Frédéric Chopin
are a set of three mazurkas written and published in 1842.[1] A typical performance of all three mazurkas takes about eleven minutes.[1]No. 1 in G major No. 2 in A-flat major No. 3 in C-sharp minorReferences[edit]^ a b Mazurkas (3) for piano, Op. 50, CT. 80-82External links[edit]Book: Frédéric ChopinMazurkas, Op. 50: Scores at the International Music Score Library Project (IMSLP)v t eMazurkas by Frédéric Chopin4 Mazurkas, Op. 6 5 Mazurkas, Op. 7 4 Mazurkas, Op. 17 4 Mazurkas, Op. 24 4 Mazurkas, Op. 30 4 Mazurkas, Op. 33 4 Mazurkas, Op. 41 3 Mazurkas, Op. 50 3 Mazurkas, Op. 56 3 Mazurkas, Op. 59 3 Mazurkas, Op. 63 4 Mazurkas, Op. 67 4 Mazurkas, Op
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Tarantelle (Chopin)
The Tarantelle in A-flat major, Op. 43 is a short piano piece in tarantella form, written by Frédéric Chopin
Frédéric Chopin
in June 1841 and published in October 1841.[1] It takes about 3 minutes to play.[2] The Tarantelle is a moto perpetuo marked Presto, and requires an advanced technique. It was inspired by Gioachino Rossini's song La Danza, also written in the tarantella's characteristic 6/8 rhythm. Chopin went to some lengths to ensure the time signature was the same as Rossini's, and he enlisted his friend Julian Fontana
Julian Fontana
to check the best editions of the Rossini work for this detail
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Répétiteur
A répétiteur (from French verb répéter meaning "to repeat, to go over, to learn, to rehearse"[1]) is an accompanist, tutor or coach of ballet dancers or opera singers.Contents1 Opera 2 Ballet 3 References 4 External linksOpera[edit] In opera, a répétiteur is the person responsible for coaching singers and playing the piano for music and production rehearsals.[1] When coaching solo singers or choir members, the répétiteur will take on a number of the roles of a vocal coach: advising singers on how to improve their pitch and pronunciation, and correcting note or phrasing errors. Répétiteurs are skilled musicians who have strong sight-reading and score reading skills
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Sergei Taneyev
Sergei Ivanovich Taneyev[1] (Russian: Серге́й Ива́нович Тане́ев, Sergey Ivanovich Taneyev, pronounced [sʲɪˈrɡej ɪˈvanəvʲɪtɕ tɐˈnʲejɪf]; November 25 [O.S. November 13] 1856 – June 19 [O.S. June 6] 1915) was a Russian composer, pianist, teacher of composition, music theorist and author.Contents1 Life 2 Taneyev and Tchaikovsky 3 Taneyev and The Five 4 Master contrapuntalist 5 Music 6 Selected discography 7 Bibliography 8 Citations 9 Sources 10 External linksLife[edit] Taneyev was born in Vladimir, Vladimir Governorate, Russian Empire, to a cultured and literary family of Russian nobility. A distant cousin, Alexander Taneyev, was also a composer, whose daughter, Anna Vyrubova, was highly influential at court
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Nikolai Tcherepnin
Nikolai Nikolayevich Tcherepnin (Russian: Николай Николаевич Черепнин; May 15 [O.S. May 3] 1873 – 26 June 1945) was a Russian composer, pianist, and conductor. He was born in Saint Petersburg
Saint Petersburg
and studied under Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov at the Saint Petersburg
Saint Petersburg
Conservatory. He conducted for the first Paris
Paris
season of Sergei Diaghilev's Ballets Russes.Contents1 Life 2 Works2.1 Opera 2.2 Ballet 2.3 Choral 2.4 Orchestral 2.5 Chamber music 2.6 Orchestrations and completions3 References 4 Sources 5 External linksLife[edit] Nikolai Tcherepnin
Nikolai Tcherepnin
was born in 1873 to a well-known and wealthy physician of the same name. The elder Nikolai moved in elite circles of artists including Fyodor Dostoyevsky
Fyodor Dostoyevsky
and Modest Mussorgsky
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Preludes (Chopin)
Frédéric Chopin
Frédéric Chopin
wrote a number of preludes for piano solo. His cycle of 24 Preludes, Op. 28, covers all major and minor keys. In addition, Chopin wrote three other preludes: a prelude in C♯ minor, Op. 45; a piece in A♭ major from 1834; and an unfinished piece in E♭ minor. These are sometimes referred to as Nos. 25, 26, and 27, respectively.Contents1 24 Preludes, Op. 281.1 Reputation and legacy 1.2 Descriptions 1.3 Comparisons2 Chopin's other preludes2.1 Prelude No. 25 (Op. 45) 2.2 Prelude No. 26 2.3 "Devil's Trill" Prelude (No. 27)3 Notes and references 4 Further reading 5 External links24 Preludes, Op. 28[edit]Prelude Op. 28, No. 4 in E minorPrelude Op. 28, No. 15 in D♭ majorGiorgi LatsoPrelude Op. 28, No. 16 in B♭ minorGiorgi LatsoPrelude Op. 28, No. 20 in C minorMIDI recording by Michael AngelkovichPrelude Op. 28, No
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Century Theatre (New York City)
The Century Theatre, originally the New Theatre, was a theatre located at 62nd Street and Central Park West
Central Park West
in New York City. Opened on November 6, 1909, it was noted for its fine architecture but due to poor acoustics and an inconvenient location it was financially unsuccessful. The theatre was demolished in 1931 and replaced by the Century Apartments building.Contents1 History 2 Publications 3 Gallery 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit]New Theatre, 1909The New Theatre was once called "New York's most spectacularly unsuccessful theater" in the WPA Guide to New York City. Envisioned in 1906 by Heinrich Conried, a director of the Metropolitan Opera House, its construction was an attempt to establish a great theatre at New York free of commercialism, one that, broadly speaking, would resemble the Comédie Française
Comédie Française
of Paris
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Waltzes, Op. 70 (Chopin)
The three Waltzes, Op. 70, were composed by Frédéric Chopin
Frédéric Chopin
from 1829 to 1832 and were posthumously published in 1855, six years after the composer's death. Each of the three waltzes lasts less than three minutes to perform in typical performances.[1] References[edit]^ Cummings, Robert. Waltzes (3) for piano, Op. 70, CT. 217–219 at AllMusic. Retrieved 9 December 2017.External links[edit]Book: Frédéric ChopinWaltzes, Op. 70: Scores at the International Music Score Library Project (IMSLP)v t eWaltzes by Frédéric ChopinGrande valse brillante in E-flat major, Op. 18 3 Waltzes, Op. 34 Waltz
Waltz
in A-flat major, Op. 42 Waltz
Waltz
in D-flat major, Op. 64, No. 1 (Minute) Waltz
Waltz
in C-sharp minor, Op. 64, No. 2 Waltz
Waltz
in A-flat major, Op. 64, No. 3 Waltz
Waltz
in A-flat major, Op. 69, No
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Mazurkas, Op. 33 (Chopin)
Mazurkas, Op. 33 are a set of four Mazurkas for piano by Frédéric Chopin, composed and published in 1838.[1]Contents1 Analysis1.1 Mazurka
Mazurka
in G♯ minor, Op. 33, No. 1 1.2 Mazurka
Mazurka
in D major, Op. 33, No. 2 1.3 Mazurka
Mazurka
in C major, Op. 33, No. 3 1.4 Mazurka
Mazurka
in B minor, Op. 33, No. 42 References 3 External linksAnalysis[edit] Mazurka
Mazurka
in G♯ minor, Op. 33, No. 1[edit]This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it. (April 2016) Mazurka
Mazurka
in G-sharp minor, Op. 33, No. 1, the opening mazurka of the set, has a tempo marking of Lento. This mazurka has an emotional melody, accompanied in the left hand with a waltz pattern. The mood changes many times throughout the piece, and to good effect
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Mazurkas, Op. 67 (Chopin)
The Op. 67 mazurkas by Frédéric Chopin
Frédéric Chopin
are a set of four mazurkas posthumously published in 1855. A typical performance of all four mazurkas lasts around seven minutes.[1] References[edit]^ Grimshaw, Kristen. "Mazurkas (4) for piano, Op. 67, CT. 92-95". Allmusic.com. Retrieved 2011-12-19. External links[edit]Book: Frédéric ChopinMazurkas, Op. 67: Scores at the International Music Score Library Project (IMSLP)v t eMazurkas by Frédéric Chopin4 Mazurkas, Op. 6 5 Mazurkas, Op. 7 4 Mazurkas, Op. 17 4 Mazurkas, Op. 24 4 Mazurkas, Op. 30 4 Mazurkas, Op. 33 4 Mazurkas, Op. 41 3 Mazurkas, Op. 50 3 Mazurkas, Op. 56 3 Mazurkas, Op. 59 3 Mazurkas, Op. 63 4 Mazurkas, Op. 67 4 Mazurkas, Op
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