HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Legislature
A LEGISLATURE is a deliberative assembly with the authority to make laws for a political entity such as a country or city . Legislatures form important parts of most governments ; in the separation of powers model, they are often contrasted with the executive and judicial branches of government. Laws enacted by legislatures are known as legislation . Legislatures observe and steer governing actions and usually have exclusive authority to amend the budget or budgets involved in the process. The members of a legislature are called legislators . In a democracy , legislators are most commonly popularly elected , although indirect election and appointment by the executive are also used, particularly for bicameral legislatures featuring an upper chamber
[...More...]

"Legislature" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Chambers Of Parliament
A LEGISLATIVE CHAMBER or HOUSE is a deliberative assembly within a legislature which generally meets and votes separately from the legislature's other chambers. Legislatures are usually unicameral , consisting of only one chamber, or bicameral , consisting of two, but there are rare examples of tricameral and tetracameral legislatures. CONTENTS * 1 Bicameralism * 2 Merging of chambers * 3 Floor and committee * 4 Security * 5 References * 6 See also BICAMERALISMThe lower house is almost always the originator of legislation , and the upper house is the body that offers the "second look" and decides whether to veto or approve the bills . In the United Kingdom legislation can be originated in either house, but the lower house can ultimately prevail if the two houses repeatedly disagree
[...More...]

"Chambers Of Parliament" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Unicameralism
In government , UNICAMERALISM (Latin uni, one + camera, chamber) is the practice of having one legislative or parliamentary chamber . Thus, a unicameral parliament or unicameral legislature is a legislature which consists of one chamber or house. CONTENTS * 1 Concept * 2 List of unicameral legislatures * 2.1 National * 2.2 Territorial * 2.3 Subnational * 2.3.1 Federations * 2.3.2 Devolved governments * 2.3.3 Other * 3 List of historical Unicameral legislatures * 3.1 National * 3.2 Subnational * 4 Unicameralism
Unicameralism
within the subdivisions of the United States
United States
* 5 Unicameralism
Unicameralism
in the Philippines
Philippines
* 6 References CONCEPTUnicameral legislatures exist when there is no widely perceived need for multicameralism . Many multicameral legislatures were created to give separate voices to different sectors of society
[...More...]

"Unicameralism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Multicameralism
In contrast to unicameralism , MULTICAMERALISM is the condition in which a legislature is divided into several deliberative assemblies, which are commonly called "chambers" or "houses". This can include bicameralism with two chambers, tricameralism with three, tetracameralism with four branches, or a system with any amount more. The word "multicameral" can also relate in other ways to its literal meaning of "many chambered" with use in science or biology. Many modern parliaments and congresses adopt a multicameral (usually bicameral) structure to provide multiple perspectives and a form of separation of powers within the legislature. Nations with bicameral legislatures. Nations with unicameral legislatures. No legislature. SEE ALSO * Federalism * Polycentric law * Politics portal * Law portal _ This legislature -related article is a stub
[...More...]

"Multicameralism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bicameralism
A BICAMERAL legislature is one in which the legislators are divided into two separate assemblies , chambers or houses. BICAMERALISM is distinguished from unicameralism , in which all of the members deliberate and vote as a single group, and from some legislatures which have three or more separate assemblies, chambers or houses. As of 2015, somewhat less than half of the world's national legislatures are bicameral. Often, the members of the two chambers are elected or selected using different methods, which vary from country to country. This can often lead to the two chambers having very different compositions of members. Enactment of primary legislation often requires a concurrent majority – the approval of a majority of members in each of the chambers of the legislature. When this is the case, the legislature may be called an example of perfect bicameralism
[...More...]

"Bicameralism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Tricameralism
TRICAMERALISM is the practice of having three legislative or parliamentary chambers. It is contrasted to unicameralism and bicameralism , both of which are far more common. The term was used in South Africa to describe the Parliament established under the apartheid regime's new South African Constitution of 1983 . Other instances of tricameral legislatures in history include Simón Bolívar 's model state. The word could also describe the French Estates-General , which had three 'estates'
[...More...]

"Tricameralism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Tetracameralism
TETRACAMERALISM (Greek : tetra-, four + Latin : _camera_, chamber) is the practice of having four legislative or parliamentary chambers. It is contrasted to unicameralism and bicameralism , which are far more common, and tricameralism , which is rarely used in government. No state currently has a tetracameral system. Medieval Scandinavian deliberative assemblies were traditionally tetracameral, with four estates; the nobility , the clergy , the burghers and the peasants . The Swedish and Finnish Riksdag of the Estates maintained this tradition the longest, having four separate legislative bodies. Finland, as a part of Imperial Russia used the tetracameral Diet of Finland until 1906, when it was replaced by the unicameral Parliament . * Law portal * Politics portal _ This legislature -related article is a stub
[...More...]

"Tetracameralism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Upper House
An UPPER HOUSE, sometimes called a Senate , is one of two chambers of a bicameral legislature (or one of three chambers of a tricameral legislature ), the other chamber being the lower house . The house formally designated as the upper house is usually smaller, and often has more restricted power, than the lower house. Examples of upper houses in countries include the UK's House of Lords , Canada's Senate , India's Rajya Sabha , Russia's Federation Council , Ireland's Seanad , Germany's Bundesrat and the United States Senate
[...More...]

"Upper House" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Senate
A SENATE is a deliberative assembly , often the upper house or chamber of a bicameral legislature or parliament . The name comes from the ancient Roman Senate (Latin: _Senatus_), so-called as an assembly of the senior (Latin: _senex_ meaning "the elder" or "old man") and therefore allegedly wiser and more experienced members of the society or ruling class . Thus, the literal meaning of the word "senate" is: ASSEMBLY OF ELDERS. Many countries have an assembly named a _senate_, composed of _senators_ who may be elected , appointed, have inherited the title, or gained membership by other methods, depending on the country. Modern senates typically serve to provide a chamber of "sober second thought" to consider legislation passed by a lower house , whose members are usually elected
[...More...]

"Senate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Lower House
A LOWER HOUSE is one of two chambers of a bicameral legislature , the other chamber being the upper house . Inside the Australian House of Representatives Despite its official position "below" the upper house, in many legislatures worldwide, the lower house has come to wield more power. A legislature composed of only one house is described as unicameral
[...More...]

"Lower House" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Parliament
In modern politics and history, a PARLIAMENT is a legislative , elected body of government. Generally, a modern parliament has three functions: representing the electorate , making laws, and overseeing the government via hearings and inquiries. Although some restrict the use of the word _parliament_ to parliamentary systems , it is also commonly used to describe the legislature in presidential systems (e.g. the French parliament ), even where it is not in the official name. Historically, parliaments included various kinds of deliberative, consultative, and judicial assemblies, e.g. mediaeval parlements
[...More...]

"Parliament" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Parliamentary System
A PARLIAMENTARY SYSTEM is a system of democratic governance of a state where the executive branch derives its democratic legitimacy from its ability to command the confidence of the legislative branch, typically a parliament , and is also held accountable to that parliament. In a parliamentary system, the head of state is usually a different person from the head of government . This is in contrast to a presidential system , where the head of state often is also the head of government and, most importantly, the executive branch does not derive its democratic legitimacy from the legislature
[...More...]

"Parliamentary System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Parliamentary Group
A PARLIAMENTARY GROUP, PARLIAMENTARY PARTY, or PARLIAMENTARY CAUCUS is a group consisting of members of the same political party or electoral fusion of parties in a legislative assembly such as a parliament or a city council . Parliamentary groups correspond to "CAUCUSES" in the United States Congress and in the Canadian Parliament. A parliamentary group is sometimes called the _parliamentary wing_ of a party, as distinct from its _organisational wing_. Generally, parliamentary groups have some independence from the wider party organisations. It is often thought improper for elected MPs to take instructions solely from non-elected party officials or from the small subset of the electorate represented by party members. In any case, the exigencies of government, the need to cooperate with other members of the legislature and the desire to retain the support of the electorate as a whole often preclude strict adherence to the wider party's wishes
[...More...]

"Parliamentary Group" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Member Of Parliament
A MEMBER OF PARLIAMENT (MP) is the representative of the voters to a parliament . In many countries with bicameral parliaments, this category includes specifically members of the lower house, as upper houses often have a different title. Members of parliament tend to form parliamentary groups (also called _parliamentary parties_) with members of the same political party
[...More...]

"Member Of Parliament" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

International Parliament
An INTERNATIONAL PARLIAMENT is a branch of an intergovernmental organization tasked with legislative powers and thus establishing a hybrid system of not only intergovernmentalism , but also supranationalism . It could be based on a predecessor inter-parliamentary institution or a newly established organization-level legislature. Such branches of intergovernmental organizations are typically established in order to provide for representation of citizens , rather than governments who are represented in other bodies within the organization. The assembly can be composed of members of the national legislatures (whose members are directly elected in most cases ) or of its own directly elected members, further strengthening the supranationalism of the organization
[...More...]

"International Parliament" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Parliamentary Procedure
PARLIAMENTARY PROCEDURE is the body of rules , ethics and customs governing meetings and other operations of clubs , organizations , legislative bodies and other deliberative assemblies . In the United Kingdom , Canada , Ireland , Australia , New Zealand , South Africa and other English-speaking countries it is often called _chairmanship_, _chairing_, the _law of meetings_, _procedure at meetings_ or the _conduct of meetings_. In the United States, parliamentary procedure is also referred to as _parliamentary law_, _parliamentary practice_, _legislative procedure_ or _rules of order_. At its heart is the rule of the majority with respect for the minority. Its object is to allow deliberation upon questions of interest to the organization and to arrive at the sense or the will of the assembly upon these questions
[...More...]

"Parliamentary Procedure" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.