HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Legend
Legend
Legend
is a genre of folklore that consists of a narrative featuring human actions perceived both by teller and listeners to take place within human history. Narratives in this genre may demonstrate human values, and which possesses certain qualities that give the tale verisimilitude. Legend, for its active and passive participants, includes no happenings that are outside the realm of "possibility," but may include miracles. Legends may be transformed over time, in order to keep them fresh and vital, and realistic. Many legends operate within the realm of uncertainty, never being entirely believed by the participants, but also never being resolutely doubted.[1] The Brothers Grimm
Brothers Grimm
defined legend as folktale historically grounded.[2] A modern folklorist's professional definition of legend was proposed by Timothy R
[...More...]

"Legend" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Will Erich Peuckert
Will-Erich Peuckert (11 May 1895 – 25 October 1969) was a German folklorist. Life[edit] Peuckert was born in Töppendorf in Lower Silesia
Lower Silesia
on May 1, 1895. He studied History and Volkskunde at the University of Breslau, where he delivered his dissertation, and went on teach at the Pedagogical Academy in Breslau. There he began to make a name for himself through several publications on German and Silesian folklore. Before he reached professorship, a defamation campaign pressed by a colleague convinced the Nazi authorities to revoke his teaching permissions in 1935
[...More...]

"Will Erich Peuckert" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rumour
A rumor (American English) or rumour (British English; see spelling differences) is "a tall tale of explanations of events circulating from person to person and pertaining to an object, event, or issue in public concern."[1] In the social sciences, a rumor involves some kind of a statement whose veracity is not quickly or ever confirmed. In addition, some scholars have identified rumor as a subset of propaganda
[...More...]

"Rumour" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Chronicle
A chronicle (Latin: chronica, from Greek χρονικά, from χρόνος, chronos, "time") is a historical account of facts and events ranged in chronological order, as in a time line. Typically, equal weight is given for historically important events and local events, the purpose being the recording of events that occurred, seen from the perspective of the chronicler
[...More...]

"Chronicle" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

John Foxe
John Foxe
John Foxe
(1516/17[1] – 18 April 1587) was an English historian and martyrologist, the author of Actes and Monuments
Actes and Monuments
(popularly known as Foxe's Book of Martyrs), an account of Christian
Christian
martyrs throughout Western history, but emphasizing the sufferings of English Protestants and proto-Protestants from the 14th century through the reign of Mary I
[...More...]

"John Foxe" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Motif (folkloristics)
Motif is a word used by folklorists who analyze, interpret, and describe the traditional elements found in the lore of particular folk groups and compare the folklore of various regions and cultures of the world based on these motif patterns
[...More...]

"Motif (folkloristics)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Protestant
Protestantism
Protestantism
is the second largest form of Christianity
Christianity
with collectively more than 900 million adherents worldwide or nearly 40% of all Christians.[1][2][3][a] It originated with the Reformation,[b] a movement against what its followers con
[...More...]

"Protestant" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Medieval Latin
Medieval Latin
Latin
was the form of Latin
Latin
used in the Middle Ages, primarily as a medium of scholarly exchange, as the liturgical language of Chalcedonian Christianity[dubious – discuss] and the Roman Catholic Church, and as a language of science, literature, law, and administration. Despite the clerical origin of many of its authors, medieval Latin
Latin
should not be confused with Ecclesiastical Latin. There is no real consensus on the exact boundary where Late Latin
Latin
ends and medieval Latin
Latin
begins
[...More...]

"Medieval Latin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Old French
Old French
Old French
(franceis, françois, romanz; Modern French: ancien français) was the language spoken in Northern France
France
from the 8th century to the 14th century. In the 14th century, these dialects came to be collectively known as the langue d'oïl, contrasting with the langue d'oc or Occitan language
Occitan language
in the south of France
[...More...]

"Old French" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Loanword
A loanword (also loan word or loan-word) is a word adopted from one language (the donor language) and incorporated into another language without translation
[...More...]

"Loanword" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ernst Bernheim
Ernst Bernheim
Ernst Bernheim
(19 February 1850 – 9 July 1942) was a German historian, best known for an influential Lehrbuch der historischen Methode (1889) on historical method.Contents1 Family 2 Career 3 Nazi era 4 Memory 5 References 6 External linksFamily[edit] He was born in Hamburg
Hamburg
as a son of merchant Louis Bernheim (later changed to Ludwig Berheim, born 7 December 1815 in Fürstenberg) and Emma Simon (born 15 April 1834 in Kolberg), who since 1834 lived in Hamburg. On 16 April 1884 he married Amalie ("Emma") Henriette Jessen (born 18 September 1861 in Hamburg, died 9 July 1945 in Greifswald). They had a daughter and three sons.[1] Career[edit] Ernst attended the Johanneum since Easter, 1862, and graduated with Abitur
Abitur
on 22 September 1868. From 1868 to 1872 he studied history in Berlin, Heidelberg, and Straßburg. He graduated with the grades Dr. phil and Dr jur
[...More...]

"Ernst Bernheim" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Gordon Allport
Gordon Willard Allport (November 11, 1897 – October 9, 1967) was an American psychologist. Allport was one of the first psychologists to focus on the study of the personality, and is often referred to as one of the founding figures of personality psychology. He contributed to the formation of values scales and rejected both a psychoanalytic approach to personality, which he thought often was too deeply interpretive, and a behavioral approach, which he thought did not provide deep enough interpretations from their data. He emphasized the uniqueness of each individual, and the importance of the present context, as opposed to past history, for understanding the personality. Allport had a profound and lasting influence on the field of psychology, even though his work is cited much less often than that of other well-known figures.[1] Part of his influence stemmed from his knack for exploring and broadly conceptualizing important and interesting topics (e.g
[...More...]

"Gordon Allport" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Friedrich Ranke
Friedrich Ranke (21 September 1882 - 11 October 1950) was a German medievalist philologist and folklorist. His Old Norse textbook Altnordisches Elementarbuch remains a standard, and all literature concerning Gottfried von Strassburgs Tristan und Isold uses Ranke's line numbering for references to the text. Born in Lübeck as one of three sons of the theologian Leopold Friedrich Ranke and his wife Julie (von Bever) (1850–1924) he was a brother of the Egyptologists Hermann und Otto Ranke (1880–1917). Graduating from the Katharineum at Lübeck, he studied German, English and Nordic philology at the universities of Göttingen (1902/03), Munich (1903/05) and Berlin (1905/07). In Munich he studied with the pioneering folklorist Friedrich von der Leyen. In Berlin he made his publishing debut with Sprache und Stil im Wälschen Gast des Thomasin von Circlaria ("Language and style in 'The Romansh Guest' by Thomasin von Zirclaere")
[...More...]

"Friedrich Ranke" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Prodigal Son
The Parable of the Prodigal Son (also known as the Two Brothers, Lost Son, Loving Father, or Lovesick Father)[1][2] is one of the parables of Jesus and appears in Luke 15:11–32. Jesus Christ shares it with his disciples, the Pharisees and others. In the story, a father has two sons. The younger son asks for his inheritance and, after wasting his fortune (the word prodigal means "wastefully extravagant"), becomes destitute. He returns home with the intention of begging his father to be made one of his hired servants, expecting his relationship with his father is likely severed. The father welcomes him back and celebrates his return. The older son refuses to participate. The father reminds the older son that one day he will inherit everything, and that they should still celebrate the return of the younger son because he was lost and is now found. It is the third and final part of a cycle on redemption, following the Parable of the Lost Sheep and the Parable of the Lost Coin
[...More...]

"Prodigal Son" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Verisimilitude (literature)
Verisimilitude /ˌvɛrɪsɪˈmɪlɪtjuːd/ is the "lifelikeness" or believability of a work of fiction
[...More...]

"Verisimilitude (literature)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Supernatural
The supernatural (Medieval Latin: supernātūrālis: supra "above" + naturalis "natural", first used: 1520–1530 AD)[1][2] is that which exists (or is claimed to exist), yet cannot be explained by laws of nature. Examples often include characteristics of or relating to ghosts, angels, gods, souls and spirits, non-material beings, or anything else considered beyond nature like magic, miracles, or etc..[3] Over time, things once thought to be supernatural such as lightning, seasons, and human senses have been shown to have entirely naturalistic explanations and origins. Some believe that which is considered supernatural will someday be discovered to be completely physical and natural. Those who believe only the physical world exists are called naturalists
[...More...]

"Supernatural" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.