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Leadenhall Building
122 Leadenhall Street
Leadenhall Street
is an address on Leadenhall Street
Leadenhall Street
in London where the 225 m (737 ft) tall Leadenhall Building is located
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Façade
A facade (also façade; /fəˈsɑːd/)[1] is generally one exterior side of a building, usually, but not always, the front. It is a foreign loan word from the French façade, which means "frontage" or "face". In architecture, the facade of a building is often the most important aspect from a design standpoint, as it sets the tone for the rest of the building
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Provisional Irish Republican Army
United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(incl. British Army, Royal Ulster Constabulary[5][6][7] Ulster
Ulster
loyalist paramilitaries[8] Republic of Ireland
Republic of Ireland
"Free State" (An Garda Síochána ; Irish Army (Although the IRA's own rules prohibited their Volunteers from carrying out attacks against the "Free State".)The Provisional Irish Republican Army
Irish Republican Army
(IRA or Provisional IRA) was[9][10][11][12] an Irish republican paramilitary organisation that sought end of British involvement in Northern Ireland[13], facilitate the reunification of Ireland
Ireland
and to bring about an independent socialist[2] republic encompassing all of Ireland.[14][15] It was the biggest and most active republican paramilitary group during the Troubles
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Calyon
Crédit Agricole
Crédit Agricole
Corporate and Investment Bank
Bank
( Crédit Agricole
Crédit Agricole
CIB, formerly Calyon) is Crédit Agricole's corporate and investment banking entity. With a staff of 7 395 employees[1] (excluding private banking)[1] in 32 countries,[2] Crédit Agricole
Crédit Agricole
CIB is active in a broad range of capital markets, investment banking and financing activities
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Richard Rogers
Richard George Rogers (1933-07-23) 23 July 1933 (age 84) Florence, ItalyFurther informationNationality British, ItalianAlma mater Architectural Association School of Architecture, Yale School of ArchitectureOccupation ArchitectAwardsRIBA Gold Medal (1985) Thomas Jefferson Medal (1999) Praemium Imperiale
Praemium Imperiale
(2000) Stir
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Bovis Lend Lease
1885 as Bovis (London) Acquired by Lend Lease Corporation
Lend Lease Corporation
in 1999Founder C. W
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Asbestos
Asbestos
Asbestos
is a set of six naturally occurring silicate minerals,[1] which all have in common their eponymous asbestiform habit: i.e. long (roughly 1:20 aspect ratio), thin fibrous crystals, with each visible fiber composed of millions of microscopic "fibrils" that can be released by abrasion and other processes.[2] They are commonly known by their colors, as blue asbestos, brown asbestos, white asbestos, and green asbestos.[3] Asbestos
Asbestos
mining existed more than 4,000 years ago, but large-scale mining began at the end of the 19th century, when manufacturers and builders began using asbestos for its desirable physical properties.[1] Some of those properties are sound absorption, average tensile strength, affordability, and resistance to fire, heat, and electricity. It was used in such applications as electrical insulation for hotplate wiring and in building insulation
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Truss
In engineering, a truss is a structure that "consists of two-force members only, where the members are organized so that the assemblage as a whole behaves as a single object".[1] A "two-force member" is a structural component where force is applied to only two points. Although this rigorous definition allows the members to have any shape connected in any stable configuration, trusses typically comprise five or more triangular units constructed with straight members whose ends are connected at joints referred to as nodes. In this typical context, external forces and reactions to those forces are considered to act only at the nodes and result in forces in the members that are either tensile or compressive
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City Of London Corporation
The City of London
City of London
Corporation, officially and legally the Mayor
Mayor
and Commonalty and Citizens of the City of London, is the municipal governing body of the City of London, the historic centre of London and the location of much of the UK's financial sector. In 2006 the name was changed from Corporation of London
London
to avoid confusion with the wider London
London
local government, the Greater London Authority.[3] The Corporation is probably the world's oldest continuously-elected local government authority
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London Stock Exchange
The London
London
Stock
Stock
Exchange (LSE) is a stock exchange located in the City of London, England. As of December 2014[update], the Exchange had a market capitalisation of US$6.06 trillion (short scale), making it the third-largest stock exchange in the world[2] by this measurement (the largest in Europe ahead of Euronext). The Exchange was founded in 1801 and its current premises are situated in Paternoster Square
Paternoster Square
close to St Paul's Cathedral
St Paul's Cathedral
in the City of London. The Exchange is part of the London
London
Stock
Stock
Exchange Group. London
London
Stock
Stock
Exchange is one of the world’s oldest stock exchanges and can trace its history back more than 300 years
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Atrium (architecture)
In architecture, an atrium (plural: atria or atriums)[1] is a large open air or skylight covered space surrounded by a building.[2] Atria were a common feature in Ancient Roman dwellings, providing light and ventilation to the interior. Modern atria, as developed in the late 19th and 20th centuries, are often several stories high and having a glazed roof or large windows, and often located immediately beyond the main entrance doors (in the lobby). Atria are a popular design feature because they give their buildings a "feeling of space and light."[3] The atrium has become a key feature of many buildings in recent years.[4] Atria are popular with building users, building designers and building developers. Users like atria because they create a dynamic and stimulating interior that provides shelter from the external environment while maintaining a visual link with that environment
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St. Mary Axe
St Mary Axe
Axe
was a medieval parish in the City of London
City of London
whose name survives as that of the street which it formerly occupied. The Church of St Mary Axe
Axe
was demolished in 1561 and its parish united with that of St Andrew Undershaft, which is situated on the corner of St Mary Axe
Axe
and Leadenhall Street. The site of the former church is now occupied by Fitzwilliam House, a fact acknowledged by a blue plaque on the building's façade. Nearby parishes include the medieval Great St Helen's (1210) and St Ethelburga (14th century). The street name may derive from a combination of the church dedicated to the Virgin Mary and a neighbouring tavern which prominently displayed a sign with an image of an axe, or simply from the church name itself, which may have come from the axes used by the Worshipful Company of Skinners, who were patrons
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Elevator
An elevator (US and Canada) or lift (UK, Australia,[1][2][3] Ireland,[4][5] New Zealand,[6][7] and South Africa, Nigeria
Nigeria
[8]) is a type of vertical transportation that moves people or goods between floors (levels, decks) of a building, vessel, or other structure. Elevators are generally powered by electric motors that either drive traction cables and counterweight systems like a hoist, or pump hydraulic fluid to raise a cylindrical piston like a jack. In agriculture and manufacturing, an elevator is any type of conveyor device used to lift materials in a continuous stream into bins or silos. Several types exist, such as the chain and bucket elevator, grain auger screw conveyor using the principle of Archimedes' screw, or the chain and paddles or forks of hay elevators
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Fleet Street
A street is a public thoroughfare (usually paved) in a built environment. It is a public parcel of land adjoining buildings in an urban context, on which people may freely assemble, interact, and move about. A street can be as simple as a level patch of dirt, but is more often paved with a hard, durable surface such as concrete, cobblestone or brick. Portions may also be smoothed with asphalt, embedded with rails, or otherwise prepared to accommodate non-pedestrian traffic. Originally the word "street" simply meant a paved road (Latin: "via strata"). The word "street" is still sometimes used colloquially as a synonym for "road", for example in connection with the ancient Watling Street, but city residents and urban planners draw a crucial modern distinction: a road's main function is transportation, while streets facilitate public interaction.[1] Examples of streets include pedestrian streets, alleys, and city-centre streets too crowded for road vehicles to pass
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PBS
The Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) is an American public broadcaster and television program distributor.[2] It is a non-profit organization and is the most prominent provider of government-funded educational television programming to public television stations in the United States, distributing series such as Keeping Up Appearances, BBC World News
BBC World News
(as BBC World News
BBC World News
America since 2012), Nova ScienceNow, Nova, Arthur, Sesame Street, PBS
PBS
NewsHour, Walking with Dinosaurs, Masterpiece, Nature, Rick Steves' Europe, American Masters, Frontline, and Antiques Roadshow. PBS
PBS
is funded by member station dues, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, government agencies, corporations, foundations and individual citizens
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