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Le Déjeuner Sur L'herbe
Le Déjeuner sur l'herbe (English: The Luncheon on the Grass) – originally titled Le Bain (The Bath) – is a large oil on canvas painting by Édouard Manet
Édouard Manet
created in 1862 and 1863. It depicts a female nude and a scantily dressed female bather on a picnic with two fully dressed men in a rural setting
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Déjeuner Sur L'herbe (album)
Déjeuner sur l'herbe (Lunch on the lawn) is the first album by Québécois rock band Les Breastfeeders. The album was released 4 May 2004 by Blow The Fuse Records. Track listing[edit]Mini Jupe et Watusi J'pourrais pas vivre avec toi Laisse autant le vent tout emporter Angle mort Hé-Hé Amoureux Solitaires Ostrogoth-à-Gogo L'existence précède la diésel Y a rien à faire Ça ira Vanille ou fraise dans la steppe Misérats Concerto pour rien du toutReferences[edit]^ Déjeuner sur l'herbe at AllMusicThis 2000s indie rock album–related article is a stub
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Le Capitaine Pompilius
Albert de La Fizelière (in full Albert-André Patin de La Fizelière; pen-name Ludovic de Marsay, see box to the right) (b. 7 August 1819 in Marly; d. 11 February 1878 in Paris) was a French littérateur, writer on electoral and constitutional law, art critic, and historian, known for his friendship with Champfleury
Champfleury
and for his ties to the Café Guerbois circle
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Engraving
Engraving
Engraving
is the practice of incising a design onto a hard, usually flat surface by cutting grooves into it. The result may be a decorated object in itself, as when silver, gold, steel, or glass are engraved, or may provide an intaglio printing plate, of copper or another metal, for printing images on paper as prints or illustrations; these images are also called engravings. Wood engraving
Wood engraving
is a form of relief printing and is not covered in this article. Engraving
Engraving
was a historically important method of producing images on paper in artistic printmaking, in mapmaking, and also for commercial reproductions and illustrations for books and magazines
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The Pastoral Concert
The Pastoral Concert, Fête champêtre or Le Concert champêtre is an oil painting of c. 1509 attributed to either of the Italian Renaissance masters, Titian
Titian
(more usually today) or Giorgione. It is in the Musée du Louvre
Musée du Louvre
in Paris.Contents1 History 2 Description 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] The painting was originally attributed to Giorgione, but modern critics assign it more likely to the slightly younger Titian, as the figures' robustness is thought more typical of his style.[2] It is also possible that Giorgione
Giorgione
(whose works included elements such as music, pastoral subjects and the simultaneous representation of the visible and invisible) began the work, and then, after his death in 1510, it was finished by Titian.[2] The work was owned by the Gonzaga family, perhaps inherited from Isabella d'Este: it was later sold to Charles I of England
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Giorgione
Giorgione
Giorgione
(/ˌdʒɔːrdʒiˈoʊneɪ, -ni/, US: /ˌdʒɔːrˈdʒoʊni/; Italian: [dʒorˈdʒoːne]; born Giorgio Barbarelli da Castelfranco; c. 1477/8–1510[2]) was an Italian painter of the Venetian school in the High Renaissance
High Renaissance
from Venice, whose career was ended by his death at a little over 30. Giorgione
Giorgione
is known for the elusive poetic quality of his work, though only about six surviving paintings are affirmatively acknowledged to be his
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Titian
Tiziano Vecelli or Tiziano Vecellio (pronounced [titˈtsjaːno veˈtʃɛlljo]; c. 1488/1490[1] – 27 August 1576),[2] known in English as Titian
Titian
/ˈtɪʃən/, was an Italian painter, the most important member of the 16th-century Venetian school. He was born in Pieve di Cadore, near Belluno
Belluno
(in Veneto, Republic of Venice).[3] During his lifetime he was often called da Cadore, taken from the place of his birth. Recognized by his contemporaries as "The Sun Amidst Small Stars" (recalling the famous final line of Dante's Paradiso), Titian
Titian
was one of the most versatile of Italian painters, equally adept with portraits, landscape backgrounds, and mythological and religious subjects
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The Tempest (painting)
The Tempest (Italian La Tempesta) is a Renaissance
Renaissance
painting by the Italian master Giorgione
Giorgione
dated between 1506 and 1508. Originally commissioned by the Venetian noble Gabriele Vendramin, the painting is now in the Gallerie dell'Accademia
Gallerie dell'Accademia
of Venice, Italy. Despite considerable discussion by art historians, the meaning of the scene remains elusive.Contents1 Description and interpretations 2 Cultural references and reception 3 References 4 External linksDescription and interpretations[edit] On the right a woman sits, suckling a baby
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Antoine Watteau
Jean-Antoine Watteau
Jean-Antoine Watteau
(French: [ʒɑ̃ ɑ̃twan vato]; baptised October 10, 1684 – died July 18, 1721),[2] better known as Antoine Watteau, was a French painter whose brief career spurred the revival of interest in colour and movement, as seen in the tradition of Correggio and Rubens. He revitalized the waning Baroque
Baroque
style, shifting it to the less severe, more naturalistic, less formally classical, Rococo. Watteau is credited with inventing the genre of fêtes galantes, scenes of bucolic and idyllic charm, suffused with a theatrical air
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Jean Antoine Watteau
Jean-Antoine Watteau
Jean-Antoine Watteau
(French: [ʒɑ̃ ɑ̃twan vato]; baptised October 10, 1684 – died July 18, 1721),[2] better known as Antoine Watteau, was a French painter whose brief career spurred the revival of interest in colour and movement, as seen in the tradition of Correggio and Rubens. He revitalized the waning Baroque
Baroque
style, shifting it to the less severe, more naturalistic, less formally classical, Rococo. Watteau is credited with inventing the genre of fêtes galantes, scenes of bucolic and idyllic charm, suffused with a theatrical air
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Odilon Redon
Odilon Redon
Odilon Redon
(born Bertrand-Jean Redon; French: [ʁədɔ̃]; April 20, 1840 – July 6, 1916) was a French symbolist painter, printmaker, draughtsman and pastellist.Contents1 Biography 2 Analysis of his work 3 Gallery 4 References 5 Bibliography 6 External linksBiography[edit] Odilon Redon
Odilon Redon
was born in Bordeaux, Aquitaine, to a prosperous family. The young Bertrand-Jean Redon acquired the nickname "Odilon" from his mother, Odile.[2] Redon started drawing as a child; and, at the age of ten, he was awarded a drawing prize at school. He began the formal study of drawing at fifteen; but, at his father's insistence, he changed to architecture. Failure to pass the entrance exams at Paris’ École des Beaux-Arts
École des Beaux-Arts
ended any plans for a career as an architect, although he briefly studied painting there under Jean-Léon Gérôme in 1864
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Proust
Valentin Louis Georges Eugène Marcel Proust
Marcel Proust
(/pruːst/;[1] French: [maʁsɛl pʁust]; 10 July 1871 – 18 November 1922), known as Marcel Proust, was a French novelist, critic, and essayist best known for his monumental novel À la recherche du temps perdu (In Search of Lost Time; earlier rendered as Remembrance of Things Past), published in seven parts between 1913 and 1927. He is considered by critics and writers to be one of the most influential authors of the 20th century.[2][3]Contents1 Background 2 Early writing 3 In Search of Lost Time 4 Personal life 5 Gallery 6 Bibliography 7 Translations 8 See also 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksBackground[edit] Proust was born in the Paris Borough of Auteuil (the south-western sector of the then-rustic 16th arrondissement) at the home of his great-uncle on 10 July 1871, two months after the Treaty of Frankfurt formally ended the Franco-Prussian War
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Remembrance Of Things Past
In Search of Lost Time
In Search of Lost Time
(French: À la recherche du temps perdu) – previously also translated as Remembrance of Things Past – is a novel in seven volumes, written by Marcel Proust
Marcel Proust
(1871–1922). It is considered to be his most prominent work, known both for its length and its theme of involuntary memory, the most famous example being the "episode of the madeleine" which occurs early in the first volume. It gained fame in English in translations by C. K. Scott Moncrieff
C. K. Scott Moncrieff
and Terence Kilmartin as Remembrance of Things Past, but the title In Search of Lost Time, a literal rendering of the French, has gained usage since D. J
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Le Petit Journal (newspaper)
Le Petit Journal was a conservative daily Parisian newspaper founded by Moïse Polydore Millaud; published from 1863 to 1944. Together with Le Petit Parisien, Le Matin, and Le Journal, it was one of the four major French dailies. In 1890, during the Boulangiste
Boulangiste
crisis, its circulation first reached one million copies. Five years later, it had a circulation of two million copies, making it the world's largest newspaper.[1]Contents1 History1.1 Early years 1.2 Later years and decline2 Description and contents 3 Promotional events3.1 Paris–Brest– Paris
Paris
cycle race 3.2 Paris-Belfort running race 3.3 Paris–Rouen
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École Des Beaux-Arts
An École des Beaux-Arts
École des Beaux-Arts
(French pronunciation: ​[ekɔl de bozaʁ], School of Fine Arts) is one of a number of influential art schools in France. The most famous is the École nationale supérieure des Beaux-Arts, now located on the left bank in Paris, across the Seine
Seine
from the Louvre, at 14 rue Bonaparte (in the 6th arrondissement). The school has a history spanning more than 350 years, training many of the great artists in Europe
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Jules-Antoine Castagnary
Jules-Antoine Castagnary
Jules-Antoine Castagnary
(11 April 1830 – 11 May 1888) was a French liberal politician, journalist and progressive and influential art critic, who embraced the new term "Impressionist" in his positive and perceptive review of the first Impressionist
Impressionist
show, in Le Siècle, 29 April 1874.[1] Born at Saintes, Charente-Maritime, in the west of France, Castagnary lived in Paris, where he contributed to Le Monde illustré, Le Siècle and Le Nain jaune, a political journal of Liberal tendencies. He reviewed the annual Paris salons from 1857 to 1879.[2] He organized the provincial Republican press at the time of the Siege of Paris (1870-1871). After the collapse of the French Second Empire, Castagnary, who was an anti-clerical republican, developed a secondary political career
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