HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Lau Islands
The Lau Islands
Lau Islands
(also called the Lau Group, the Eastern Group, the Eastern Archipelago) of Fiji
Fiji
are situated in the southern Pacific Ocean, just east of the Koro Sea. Of this chain of about sixty islands and islets, about thirty are inhabited. The Lau Group covers a land area of 188 square miles (487 square km), and had a population of 10,683 at the most recent census in 2007. While most of the northern Lau Group are high islands of volcanic origin, those of the south are mostly carbonate low islands. Administratively the islands belong to Lau Province.Contents1 History 2 Culture and economy 3 Notable Lauans 4 See also 5 References 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksHistory[edit]The Lau IslandsThe British explorer James Cook
James Cook
reached Vatoa
Vatoa
in 1774
[...More...]

"Lau Islands" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Pacific Ocean
The Pacific Ocean
Ocean
is the largest and deepest of Earth's oceanic divisions. It extends from the Arctic Ocean
Arctic Ocean
in the north to the Southern Ocean
Southern Ocean
(or, depending on definition, to Antarctica) in the south and is bounded by Asia
Asia
and Australia
Australia
in the west and the Americas
Americas
in the east. At 165,250,000 square kilometers (63,800,000 square miles) in area (as defined with an Antarctic
Antarctic
southern border), this largest division of the World Ocean—and, in turn, the hydrosphere—covers about 46% of Earth's water surface and about one-third of its total surface area, making it larger than all of Earth's land area combined.[1] Both the center of the Water Hemisphere and the Western Hemisphere
Western Hemisphere
are in the Pacific Ocean
[...More...]

"Pacific Ocean" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Father Of The Nation
The Father of the Nation is an honorific title given to a man considered the driving force behind the establishment of his country, state, or nation. Pater Patriae
Pater Patriae
(plural Patres Patriae), also seen as Parens Patriae, was a Roman honorific meaning the "Father of the Fatherland", bestowed by the Senate on heroes, and later on emperors. In monarchies, the monarch was often considered the "father/mother of the nation" or as a patriarch to guide his family. This concept is expressed in the Divine Right espoused in some monarchies, while in others it is codified into constitutional law as in Spain, where the monarch is considered the personification and embodiment, the symbol of the unity and permanence of the nation. In Thailand, the monarch is given the same recognition, and demonstrated loyalty is enforced with severe criminal statutes. Many dictators bestow titles upon themselves, which rarely survive the end of their regime
[...More...]

"Father Of The Nation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Cakaudrove Province
Cakaudrove is one of fourteen provinces of Fiji, and one of three based principally on the northern island of Vanua Levu, occupying the south-eastern third of the island and including the nearby islands of Taveuni, Rabi, Kioa, and numerous other islands in the Vanua Levu Group. It has a total land area of 2,816 square kilometers, with a population of 49,344 at the most recent census in 2007, making it the sixth most populous province. The only major town is Savusavu, with a population of 3,372 in 2007. Cakaudrove has proved to be one of Fiji's most influential provinces. Ratu
Ratu
Sir Penaia Ganilau, Fiji's last Governor-General and first President, held the chiefly title of Tui Cakau, with Cakaudrove as his traditional fiefdom. Former Prime Minister Sitiveni Rabuka
Sitiveni Rabuka
is also from Cakaudrove
[...More...]

"Cakaudrove Province" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Capital (political)
A capital city (or simply capital) is the municipality exercising primary status in a country, state, province, or other administrative region, usually as its seat of government. A capital is typically a city that physically encompasses the government's offices and meeting places; the status as capital is often designated by its law or constitution. In some jurisdictions, including several countries, the different branches of government are located in different settlements. In some cases, a distinction is made between the official (constitutional) capital and the seat of government, which is in another place. Capital cities that are also the prime economic, cultural, or intellectual centres of a nation or an empire are sometimes referred to as primate cities
[...More...]

"Capital (political)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Personal Union
A personal union is the combination of two or more states that have the same monarch while their boundaries, laws, and interests remain distinct.[1] A real union, by contrast, will involve the constituent states being to some extent interlinked, such as by sharing governmental institutions. In a federation and a unitary state, a central (federal) government spanning all member states exists, with the degree of self-governance distinguishing the two. The ruler in a personal union does not need to be a hereditary monarch.[2] Personal unions can arise for several reasons, ranging from coincidence (a woman who is already married to a king becomes queen regnant, and their child inherits the crown of both countries; the King
King
of one country inherits the crown of another country) to virtual annexation (where a personal union sometimes was seen as a means of preventing uprisings)
[...More...]

"Personal Union" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Maʻafu Tukuiʻaulahi
Siosaʻia Lausiʻi,[1] but since his installation on 30 Oct 1997 with the noble title 10th Maʻafu (shortened for Maʻafu Tukuʻiʻaulahi, meaning Maʻafu put in the strong current, after a happening with an ancestor around 1820), better known as Lord Maʻafu (of Vaini), is a Tongan politician, former military officer, and member of the Tongan nobility. He enrolled in the Tonga
Tonga
Defence Services on 3 March 1975, and was commissioned "the same year to become Platoon Commander of the Tonga Royal Guards"
[...More...]

"Maʻafu Tukuiʻaulahi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Tourism
Tourism
Tourism
is travel for pleasure or business; also the theory and practice of touring, the business of attracting, accommodating, and entertaining tourists, and the business of operating tours.[1] Tourism may be international, or within the traveller's country. The World Tourism
Tourism
Organization defines tourism more generally, in terms which go "beyond the common perception of tourism as being limited to holiday activity only", as people "traveling to and staying in places outside their usual environment for not more than one consecutive year for leisure, business and other purposes".[2] Tourism
Tourism
can be domestic or international, and international tourism has both incoming and outgoing implications on a country's balance of payments
[...More...]

"Tourism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Constitution
A constitution is a set of fundamental principles or established precedents according to which a state or other organization is governed.[1] These rules together make up, i.e. constitute, what the entity is. When these principles are written down into a single document or set of legal documents, those documents may be said to embody a written constitution; if they are written down in a single comprehensive document, it is said to embody a codified constitution. Some constitutions (such as the constitution of the United Kingdom) are uncodified, but written in numerous fundamental Acts of a legislature, court cases or treaties.[2] Constitutions concern different levels of organizations, from sovereign states to companies and unincorporated associations. A treaty which establishes an international organization is also its constitution, in that it would define how that organization is constituted
[...More...]

"Constitution" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Cricket
Cricket
Cricket
is a bat-and-ball game played between two teams of eleven players each on a cricket field, at the centre of which is a rectangular 20-metre (22-yard) pitch with a target at each end called the wicket (a set of three wooden stumps upon which two bails sit). Each phase of play is called an innings, during which one team bats, attempting to score as many runs as possible, whilst their opponents bowl and field, attempting to minimise the number of runs scored. When each innings ends, the teams usually swap roles for the next innings (i.e. the team that previously batted will bowl/field, and vice versa). The teams each bat for one or two innings, depending on the type of match
[...More...]

"Cricket" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Rugby Football
Rugby football
Rugby football
usually refers to rugby union or sometimes rugby league, which are both team sports, rugby union originating at Rugby School in Rugby, Warwickshire, and rugby league originating in Huddersfield, West Yorkshire
West Yorkshire
after splitting and forming the Northern Union in 1896 (what is now known as rugby league). The first rugby match in North America
North America
was played between McGill University
McGill University
and Harvard University. The champion of the match between both McGill and Harvard received the Covo cup. Rugby football
Rugby football
(both league and union) is one of many versions of football played at English public schools in the 19th century, along with association football.[1]. Although rugby league initially used rugby union rules, they are now wholly separate sports
[...More...]

"Rugby Football" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Football (soccer)
Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer,[a] is a team sport played between two teams of eleven players with a spherical ball. It is played by 250 million players in over 200 countries and dependencies, making it the world's most popular sport.[3][4][5][6] The game is played on a rectangular field with a goal at each end. The object of the game is to score by moving the ball beyond the goal line into the opposing goal. Players are not allowed to touch the ball with outstretched hands or arms while it is in play, unless they are goalkeepers within their penalty area. Other players mainly use their feet to strike or pass the ball, but may also use any other part of their body except the hands and the arms. The team that scores the most goals by the end of the match wins. If the score is level at the end of the game, either a draw is declared or the game goes into extra time or a penalty shootout depending on the format of the competition
[...More...]

"Football (soccer)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Prime Minister Of Fiji
The Prime Minister of the Republic of Fiji
Fiji
is the head of government of Fiji. The Prime Minister is appointed by the President under the terms of the 2013 Constitution of Fiji.Contents1 Description of the office 2 History of the office 3 List of Prime Ministers of Fiji
Fiji
(1970–present) 4 See also 5 ReferencesDescription of the office[edit] As a former British colony, Fiji
Fiji
has largely adopted British political models and follows the Westminster, or Cabinet, system of government, in which the executive branch of government is responsible to the legislature. The Prime Minister is appointed by the President, but must be supported, or at least accepted, by a majority in the House of Representatives. If at any time the Prime Minister loses the "confidence" of the House, he must resign, along with the entire Cabinet
[...More...]

"Prime Minister Of Fiji" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Tribute
A tribute (/ˈtrɪbjuːt/)[1] (from Latin
Latin
tributum, contribution) is wealth, often in kind, that a party gives to another as a sign of respect or, as was often the case in historical contexts, of submission or allegiance. Various ancient states exacted tribute from the rulers of land which the state conquered or otherwise threatened to conquer. In case of alliances, lesser parties may pay tribute to more powerful parties as a sign of allegiance and often in order to finance projects that benefited both parties
[...More...]

"Tribute" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

James Cook
Captain James Cook
James Cook
FRS (7 November 1728[NB 1] – 14 February 1779) was a British explorer, navigator, cartographer, and captain in the Royal Navy. Cook made detailed maps of Newfoundland prior to making three voyages to the Pacific Ocean, during which he achieved the first recorded European contact with the eastern coastline of Australia
Australia
and the Hawaiian Islands, and the first recorded circumnavigation of New Zealand. Cook joined the British merchant navy as a teenager and joined the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
in 1755. He saw action in the Seven Years' War, and subsequently surveyed and mapped much of the entrance to the Saint Lawrence River during the siege of Quebec. This helped bring Cook to the attention of the Admiralty
Admiralty
and Royal Society
[...More...]

"James Cook" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

United Kingdom
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country in western Europe
[...More...]

"United Kingdom" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.