HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Latinisation Of Names
Latinisation (also spelled Latinization[1]: see spelling differences) is the practice of rendering a non- Latin
Latin
name (or word) in a Latin style.[1] It is commonly found with historical personal names, with toponyms and in the standard binomial nomenclature of the life sciences. It goes further than romanisation, which is the transliteration of a word to the Latin
Latin
alphabet from another script (e.g. Cyrillic). This was often done in the classical to emulate Latin
Latin
authors, or to present a more impressive image. In a scientific context, the main purpose of Latinisation may be to produce a name which is internationally consistent. Latinisation may be carried out by:transforming the name into Latin
Latin
sounds (e.g. Geber for Jabir), or adding Latinate suffixes to the end of a name (e.g
[...More...]

"Latinisation Of Names" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

William The Silent
William I, Prince of Orange
Prince of Orange
(24 April 1533 – 10 July 1584), also widely known as William the Silent
William the Silent
or William the Taciturn (translated from Dutch: Willem de Zwijger),[1][2] or more commonly known as William of Orange (Dutch: Willem van Oranje), was the main leader of the Dutch revolt
Dutch revolt
against the Spanish Habsburgs
Habsburgs
that set off the Eighty Years' War (1568–1648) and resulted in the formal independence of the United Provinces in 1581. He was born in the House of Nassau
House of Nassau
as Count of Nassau-Dillenburg. He became Prince of Orange
Prince of Orange
in 1544 and is thereby the founder of the branch House of Orange-Nassau
House of Orange-Nassau
and the ancestor of the monarchy of the Netherlands. Within the Netherlands he is also known as Father of the Fatherland
[...More...]

"William The Silent" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Livonian People
The Livonians, or Livs
Livs
(Livonian: līvlizt), are a Finnic ethnic group indigenous to northern Latvia
Latvia
and southwestern Estonia.[4] Livonians historically spoke Livonian, a Uralic language
Uralic language
closely related to Estonian and Finnish. The last person to have learned and spoken Livonian as a mother tongue, Grizelda Kristiņa, died in 2013, making Livonian extinct.[5] As of 2010, there were approximately 30 people who had learned it as a second language. Historical, social and economic factors, together with an ethnically dispersed population, have resulted in the decline of the Livonian population, with only a small group surviving in the 21st century
[...More...]

"Livonian People" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Livistona
Livistona
Livistona
is a genus of palms (family Arecaceae), native to southern, southeastern and eastern Asia, Australasia, and the Horn of Africa.[2] They are fan palms, the leaves with an armed petiole terminating in a rounded, costapalmate fan of numerous leaflets.[3][4][5][6] Livistona
Livistona
is closely related to the genus Saribus, and for a time Saribus was included in Livistona. Recent studies, however, have advocated separating the two groups.[2][7] Livistona
Livistona
species are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera
Lepidoptera
species including Batrachedra
Batrachedra
arenosella (recorded on L. subglobosa) and Paysandisia archon. Kho (L
[...More...]

"Livistona" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Livingstone
The surname Livingstone is toponymic
[...More...]

"Livingstone" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Estonia
Estonia
Estonia
(/ɛˈstoʊniə/ ( listen);[11][12] Estonian: Eesti [ˈeːsti]), officially the Republic
Republic
of Estonia
Estonia
(Estonian: Eesti Vabariik), is a sovereign state in Northern Europe.[13] It is bordered to the north by the Gulf of Finland
Gulf of Finland
with Finland
Finland
on the other side, to the west by the Baltic Sea, to the south by Latvia
Latvia
(343 km), and to the east by Lake Peipus
Lake Peipus
and Russia
Russia
(338.6 km).[14] Across the Baltic Sea
Baltic Sea
lies Sweden
Sweden
in the west and Finland
Finland
in the north
[...More...]

"Estonia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Aesti
The Aesti
Aesti
(also Aestii or Aests) were an ancient people first described by the Roman historian Tacitus
Tacitus
in his treatise Germania (circa 98 AD).[1] According to Tacitus, Aestui, the land of the Aesti, was located somewhere east of the Suiones (Swedes) and west of the Sitones
Sitones
(possibly the Kvens), on the Suebian (Baltic) Sea
[...More...]

"Aesti" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ingria
Historical Ingria
Ingria
(Finnish: Inkeri or Inkerinmaa; Russian: Ингрия, Ingriya, Ижорская земля, Izhorskaya zemlya, or Ингерманландия, Ingermanlandiya; Swedish: Ingermanland; Estonian: Ingeri or Ingerimaa) is the geographical area located along the southern shore of the Gulf of Finland, bordered by Lake Ladoga
Lake Ladoga
on the Karelian Isthmus
Karelian Isthmus
in the north and by the River Narva
Narva
on the border with Estonia
Estonia
in the west. The Orthodox Izhorians, along with the Votes, are the indigenous people of historical Ingria. With the consolidation of the Kievan Rus and the expansion of the Republic of Novgorod
Republic of Novgorod
north, the indigenous Ingrians became Greek Orthodox
[...More...]

"Ingria" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Izhorians
The Izhorians
Izhorians
(Russian: Ижо́ра; ижо́рцы; sg. inkerikot, isurit, ižoralaine, inkeroine, ižora, ingermans, ingers, ingrian, pl. ižoralaizet), along with the Votes, are an indigenous people of Ingria. Small numbers can still be found in the western part of Ingria, between the Narva and Neva
Neva
rivers in northwestern Russia.Contents1 History 2 Language 3 Religion 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit]Laiba, an Izhorian vessel, in the Gulf of Finland.The history of the Izhorians
Izhorians
is bound to the history of Ingria. It is supposed that shortly after 1000 AD the Izhorians
Izhorians
moved from Karelia to the west and south-west. In 1478, the Novgorod Republic, where Ingrians had settled, was united with the Grand Duchy of Moscow, and some of the Izhorians
Izhorians
were transferred to the east
[...More...]

"Izhorians" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Livonia
Livonia
Livonia
(Livonian: Līvõmō, Estonian: Liivimaa, German and Scandinavian languages: Livland, Latvian and Lithuanian: Livonija, Polish: Inflanty, archaic English Livland,[1] Liwlandia; Russian: Лифляндия, translit. Liflyandiya) is a historical region on the eastern shores of the Baltic Sea
[...More...]

"Livonia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Roman Empire
Mediolanum
Mediolanum
(286–402, Western) Augusta Treverorum Sirmium Ravenna
Ravenna
(402–476, Western) Nicomedia
[...More...]

"Roman Empire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
[...More...]

"Latin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Greeks
Pontic SteppeDomestication of the horse Kurgan Kurgan
Kurgan
culture Steppe culturesBug-Dniester Sredny Stog Dnieper-Donets Samara Khvalynsk YamnaMikhaylovka cultureCaucasusMaykopEast-AsiaAfanasevoEastern EuropeUsatovo Cernavodă CucuteniNorthern EuropeCorded wareBaden Middle DnieperBronze AgePontic SteppeChariot Yamna Catacomb Multi-cordoned ware Poltavka SrubnaNorthern/Eastern SteppeAbashevo culture Andronovo SintashtaEuropeGlobular Amphora Corded ware Beaker Unetice Trzciniec Nordic Bronze Age Terramare Tumulus
[...More...]

"Greeks" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Proper Noun
A proper noun is a noun that in its primary application refers to a unique entity, such as London, Jupiter, Sarah, or Microsoft, as distinguished from a common noun, which usually refers to a class of entities (city, planet, person, corporation), or non-unique instances of a specific class (a city, another planet, these persons, our corporation).[1][2] Some proper nouns occur in plural form (optionally or exclusively), and then they refer to groups of entities considered as unique (the Hendersons, the Everglades, the Azores, the Pleiades). Proper nouns can also occur in secondary applications, for example modifying nouns (the Mozart experience; his Azores
Azores
adventure), or in the role of common nouns (he's no Pavarotti; a few would-be Napoleons). The detailed definition of the term is problematic and to an extent governed by convention.[3][4] A distinction is normally made in current linguistics between proper nouns and proper names
[...More...]

"Proper Noun" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Declension
In linguistics, declension is the inflection (changing the form of a word) of nouns, pronouns, adjectives, adverbs, numerals, and articles to indicate number (at least singular and plural), case (nominative or subjective, genitive or possessive, etc.), and/or gender. A declension is also a group of nouns that follow a particular pattern of inflection. Declension occurs in many of the world's languages. Among modern languages, declension is an important aspect of Arabic, Finnish, Turkish, many Amerindian
Amerindian
languages such as Quechua, Bantu languages such as Zulu, Slavic languages
Slavic languages
such as Russian, some Germanic languages such as High German, and some others. In the ancient world, languages that were highly declined included Sanskrit, Greek, Latin, and Hebrew
[...More...]

"Declension" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.