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Latex
La TeX
TeX
(/ˈlɑːtɛx/ LAH-tekh or /ˈleɪtɛx/ LAY-tekh;[1] a shortening of Lamport TeX) is a document preparation system.[2] When writing, the writer uses plain text as opposed to the formatted text found in WYSIWYG
WYSIWYG
("what you see is what you get") word processors like Microsoft Word, LibreOffice Writer
LibreOffice Writer
and Apple Pages. The writer uses markup tagging conventions to define the general structure of a document (such as article, book, and letter), to stylise text throughout a document (such as bold and italics), and to add citations and cross-references. A TeX
TeX
distribution such as TeX
TeX
Live or Mik TeX
TeX
is used to produce an output file (such as PDF
PDF
or DVI) suitable for printing or digital distribution
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CSS
Cascading Style Sheets
Cascading Style Sheets
(CSS) is a style sheet language used for describing the presentation of a document written in a markup language.[1] Although most often used to set the visual style of web pages and user interfaces written in HTML
HTML
and XHTML, the language can be applied to any XML
XML
document, including plain XML, SVG and XUL, and is applicable to rendering in speech, or on other media
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Macro Language
A macro (short for "macroinstruction", from Greek μακρός 'long') in computer science is a rule or pattern that specifies how a certain input sequence (often a sequence of characters) should be mapped to a replacement output sequence (also often a sequence of characters) according to a defined procedure. The mapping process that instantiates (transforms) a macro use into a specific sequence is known as macro expansion. A facility for writing macros may be provided as part of a software application or as a part of a programming language. In the former case, macros are used to make tasks using the application less repetitive
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Desktop Publishing
Desktop publishing
Desktop publishing
(abbreviated DTP) is the creation of documents using page layout skills on a personal computer primarily for print. Desktop publishing
Desktop publishing
software can generate layouts and produce typographic quality text and images comparable to traditional typography and printing. This technology allows individuals, businesses, and other organizations to self-publish a wide range of printed matter. Desktop publishing
Desktop publishing
is also the main reference for digital typography
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Bibliography
Bibliography
Bibliography
(from Greek βιβλίον biblion, "book" and -γραφία -graphia, "writing"), as a discipline, is traditionally the academic study of books as physical, cultural objects; in this sense, it is also known as bibliology[1] (from Greek -λογία, -logia)
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Macro (computer Science)
A macro (short for "macroinstruction", from Greek μακρός 'long') in computer science is a rule or pattern that specifies how a certain input sequence (often a sequence of characters) should be mapped to a replacement output sequence (also often a sequence of characters) according to a defined procedure. The mapping process that instantiates (transforms) a macro use into a specific sequence is known as macro expansion. A facility for writing macros may be provided as part of a software application or as a part of a programming language. In the former case, macros are used to make tasks using the application less repetitive
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SRI International
SRI International
SRI International
(SRI) is an American nonprofit research institute headquartered in Menlo Park, California. The trustees of Stanford University established SRI in 1946 as a center of innovation to support economic development in the region. The organization was founded as the Stanford Research
Research
Institute. SRI formally separated from Stanford University
Stanford University
in 1970 and became known as SRI International
SRI International
in 1977. SRI performs client-sponsored research and development for government agencies, commercial businesses, and private foundations. It also licenses its technologies,[2] forms strategic partnerships, sells products,[3] and creates spin-off companies.[4] SRI's annual revenue in 2014 was approximately $540 million. SRI's headquarters are located near the Stanford University
Stanford University
campus. William A
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Free Software
Free software
Free software
or libre software[1][2] is computer software distributed under terms that allow users to run the software for any purpose as well as to study, change, and distribute it and any adapted versions.[3][4][5][6][7] Free software
Free software
is a matter of liberty, not price: users —individually or in cooperation with computer programmers— are free to do what they want with their copies of a free software (including profiting from them) regardless of how much is paid to obtain the program.[8][2] Computer programs are deemed free insofar as they give users (not just the developer) ultimate control over the first, thereby allowing them to control what their devices are programmed to do.[5][9] The right to study and modify a computer program entails that source code —the preferred format for making changes— be made available to users of that program
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Separation Of Presentation And Content
Separation of content and presentation
Separation of content and presentation
(or separation of content and style) is a design principle under which visual and design aspects (presentation and style) are separated from the core material and structure (content) of a document.[1][2][non-primary source needed] A typical analogy used to explain this principle is the distinction between the human skeleton (as the structural component) and human flesh (as the visual component) which makes up the body's appearance. Common applications of this principle are seen in Web design
Web design
( HTML
HTML
and CSS)[3][4] and markup language (see LaTeX).Contents1 Use in Web design 2 Use in writing 3 See also 4 ReferencesUse in Web design[edit] This principle is not a rigid guideline, but serves more as best practice for keeping appearance and structure separate
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Word Processor
A word processor is an electronic device or computer software application that performs the task of composing, editing, formatting, and printing of documents. The word processor was a stand-alone office machine in the 1960s, combining the keyboard text-entry and printing functions of an electric typewriter with a recording unit, either tape or floppy disk (as used by the Wang machine) with a simple dedicated computer processor for the editing of text.[1] Although features and designs varied among manufacturers and models, and new features were added as technology advanced, word processors typically featured a monochrome display and the ability to save documents on memory cards or diskettes
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Cascading Style Sheets
Cascading Style Sheets
Cascading Style Sheets
(CSS) is a style sheet language used for describing the presentation of a document written in a markup language.[1] Although most often used to set the visual style of web pages and user interfaces written in HTML
HTML
and XHTML, the language can be applied to any XML
XML
document, including plain XML, SVG and XUL, and is applicable to rendering in speech, or on other media
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HTML
Hypertext
Hypertext
Markup Language (HTML) is the standard markup language for creating web pages and web applications. With Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) and JavaScript, it forms a triad of cornerstone technologies for the World Wide Web.[4] Web browsers receive HTML
HTML
documents from a web server or from local storage and render the documents into multimedia web pages. HTML
HTML
describes the structure of a web page semantically and originally included cues for the appearance of the document. HTML
HTML
elements are the building blocks of HTML
HTML
pages. With HTML constructs, images and other objects such as interactive forms may be embedded into the rendered page. HTML
HTML
provides a means to create structured documents by denoting structural semantics for text such as headings, paragraphs, lists, links, quotes and other items
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Text Editor
A text editor is a type of computer program that edits plain text. Such programs are sometimes known as "notepad" software, following the Microsoft Notepad.[1][2][3] Text editors are provided with operating systems and software development packages, and can be used to change configuration files, documentation files and programming language source code.[4]Contents1 Plain text
Plain text
vs. rich text 2 History 3 Types of text editors 4 Typical features 5 Specialised editors 6 See also 7 Notes 8 References 9 External links Plain text
Plain text
vs. rich text[edit] Main articles: Plain text
Plain text
and rich text There are important differences between plain text (created and edited by text editors) and rich text (such as those created by word processors or desktop publishing software). Plain text
Plain text
exclusively consists of character representation
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XML
In computing, Extensible Markup Language
Language
(XML) is a markup language that defines a set of rules for encoding documents in a format that is both human-readable and machine-readable. The W3C's XML
XML
1.0 Specification[2] and several other related specifications[3]—all of them free open standards—define XML.[4] The design goals of XML
XML
emphasize simplicity, generality, and usability across the Internet.[5] It is a textual data format with strong support via Unicode
Unicode
for different human languages
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Square Root
In mathematics, a square root of a number a is a number y such that y2 = a; in other words, a number y whose square (the result of multiplying the number by itself, or y⋅y) is a.[1] For example, 4 and −4 are square roots of 16 because 42 = (−4)2 = 16. Every nonnegative real number a has a unique nonnegative square root, called the principal square root, which is denoted by √a, where √ is called the radical sign or radix. For example, the principal square root of 9 is 3, which is denoted by √9 = 3, because 32 = 3 • 3 = 9 and 3 is nonnegative. The term (or number) whose square root is being considered is known as the radicand. The radicand is the number or expression underneath the radical sign, in this example 9. Every positive number a has two square roots: √a, which is positive, and −√a, which is negative. Together, these two roots are denoted as ± √a (see ± shorthand)
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Greek Alphabet
The Greek alphabet
Greek alphabet
has been used to write the Greek language
Greek language
since the late 9th century BC or early 8th century BC.[3][4] It was derived from the earlier Phoenician alphabet,[5] and was the first alphabetic script to have distinct letters for vowels as well as consonants. It is the ancestor of the Latin and Cyrillic scripts.[6] Apart from its use in writing the Greek language, in both its ancient and its modern forms, the Greek alphabet
Greek alphabet
today also serves as a source of technical symbols and labels in many domains of mathematics, science and other fields. In its classical and modern forms, the alphabet has 24 letters, ordered from alpha to omega
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