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Larding
A lardon, also called lardoon or larding, is a small strip or cube of pork fat (usually subcutaneous fat) used in a wide variety of cuisines to flavor savory foods and salads. In French cuisine, lardons are also used for larding, by threading them with a needle into meats that are to be braised or roasted
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Lard
Lard is pig fat in both its rendered and unrendered forms. It is obtained from any part of the pig where there is a high proportion of adipose tissue. It can be rendered by steaming it or boiling it in water and then separating the insoluble fat from the water, or by the use of dry heat. It is a semi-soft white fat with a high saturated fatty acid content and no transfats. Refined lard is usually sold as paper-wrapped blocks. Lard is commonly used in many cuisines around the world as a cooking fat or shortening, or as a spread similar to butter. It is an ingredient in various savoury dishes such as sausages, pâtés and fillings, and it is particularly favored for the preparation of pastry because of the "flakiness" it brings to the product. Its use in western contemporary cuisine has diminished with the increased popularity of vegetable oils, but many contemporary cooks and bakers still favor it over other fats for certain select uses
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Crème Fraiche
Crème fraîche (English pronunciation : /ˌkrɛmˈfrɛʃ/, French pronunciation: ​[kʁɛm fʁɛʃ], lit. "fresh cream") is a dairy product, a soured cream containing 10–45% butterfat, with a pH of around 4.5. It is soured with a bacterial culture. European labeling regulations disallow any ingredients other than cream and bacterial culture. Compared to U.S.-style sour cream, which may contain thickening agents, it is less sour, more fluid, and fattier
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Gruyère (cheese)
Gruyère (/ɡrˈjɛər/ or /ɡrɪˈjɛər/; French pronunciation: ​[ɡʁyjɛʁ], German: Greyerzer) is a hard yellow cheese that originated in the cantons of Fribourg, Vaud, Neuchâtel, Jura, and Bern in Switzerland, and is named after the town of Gruyères. Before 2001, when Gruyère gained the appellation d'origine contrôlée (AOC, now AOP) status as a Swiss cheese, some controversy existed whether French cheeses of a similar nature could also be labelled Gruyère (French Gruyère-style cheeses include Comté and Beaufort). Gruyère is sweet but slightly salty, with a flavor that varies widely with age. It is often described as creamy and nutty when young, becoming more assertive, earthy, and complex as it matures
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Reblochon Cheese
Reblochon (French pronunciation: ​[ʁə.blɔ.ʃɔ̃]) is a soft washed-rind and smear-ripened French cheese made in the Alpine region of Savoy from raw cow's milk. It has its own AOC designation. Reblochon was first produced in the Thônes and Arly valleys, in the Aravis massif. Thônes remains the centre of Reblochon production; the cheeses are still made in the local cooperatives. Until 1964 Reblochon was also produced in Italian areas of the Alps
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Crème Fraîche
Crème fraîche (English pronunciation : /ˌkrɛmˈfrɛʃ/, French pronunciation: ​[kʁɛm fʁɛʃ], lit. "fresh cream") is a dairy product, a soured cream containing 10–45% butterfat, with a pH of around 4.5. It is soured with a bacterial culture. European labeling regulations disallow any ingredients other than cream and bacterial culture. Compared to U.S.-style sour cream, which may contain thickening agents, it is less sour, more fluid, and fattier
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Sautéing
Sautéing (/ˈst.ɪŋ/ or US: /sˈt.ɪŋ/, /sɔːˈt.ɪŋ/; from the French sauté [sote], lit. "jumped, bounced" in reference to tossing while cooking) is a method of cooking food that uses a small amount of oil or fat in a shallow pan over relatively high heat
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Salad Dressing
A salad is a dish consisting of a mixture of small pieces of food, usually vegetables. Salads are typically served at room temperature or chilled, with notable exceptions such as south German potato salad which is served warm. Salads may contain virtually any type of ready-to-eat food. Garden salads use a base of leafy greens like lettuce, arugula, kale or spinach; they are common enough that the word salad alone often refers specifically to garden salads. Other types include bean salad, tuna salad, fattoush, Greek salad, and Japanese sōmen salad (a noodle-based salad)
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Stews
A stew is a combination of solid food ingredients that have been cooked in liquid and served in the resultant gravy. Ingredients in a stew can include any combination of vegetables (such as carrots, potatoes, onions, beans, peppers, mushrooms, and tomatoes) or meat, especially tougher meats suitable for slow-cooking, such as beef. Poultry, sausages, and seafood are also used. While water can be used as the stew-cooking liquid, wine, stock, and beer are also common. Seasoning and flavourings may also be added. Stews are typically cooked at a relatively low temperature (simmered, not boiled), allowing flavors to mingle. Stewing is suitable for the least tender cuts of meat that become tender and juicy with the slow moist heat method. This makes it popular in low-cost cooking
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Julia Child
Julia Carolyn Child (born McWilliams; August 15, 1912 – August 12, 2004) was an American chef, author and television personality
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Endive
Endive (/ˈɛndv/ or /ˈɑːndiv/) is a leaf vegetable belonging to the genus Cichorium, which includes several similar bitter leafed vegetables. Species include Cichorium endivia (also called endive), Cichorium pumilum (also called wild endive), and Cichorium intybus (also called common chicory)
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Vinaigrette
Vinaigrette (/vɪnəˈɡrɛt/ vin-ə-GRET) is made by mixing an oil with something acidic such as vinegar or lemon juice. The mixture can be enhanced with salt, herbs and/or spices. It is used most commonly as a salad dressing, but can also be used as a marinade
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Alsace
Alsace (/ælˈsæs, -ˈss, ˈælsæs, -ss/, French: [alzas] (About this sound listen); Alsatian: ’s Elsass [ˈɛlsɑs]; German: Elsass [ˈɛlzas] (About this sound listen); Latin: Alsatia) is a cultural and historical region in eastern France now located in the administrative region of Grand Est. Alsace is located on France's eastern border and on the west bank of the upper Rhine adjacent to Germany and Switzerland. From 1982 until January 2016, Alsace was also the smallest (but not the least populated) of 22 administrative régions in metropolitan France, consisting of the Bas-Rhin and Haut-Rhin departments
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Onion
The onion (Allium cepa L., from Latin cepa "onion"), also known as the bulb onion or common onion, is a vegetable that is the most widely cultivated species of the genus Allium. Its close relatives include the garlic, shallot, leek, chive, and Chinese onion. This genus also contains several other species variously referred to as onions and cultivated for food, such as the Japanese bunching onion (Allium fistulosum), the tree onion (A. ×proliferum), and the Canada onion (Allium canadense). The name "wild onion" is applied to a number of Allium species, but A. cepa is exclusively known from cultivation
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Savoie
Savoie (pronounced [savwa]; Arpitan: Savouè, Italian: Savoia [saˈvɔːja], English: Savoy /səˈvɔɪ/) is a French department in the Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes region of the French Alps. Together with the Haute-Savoie, Savoie is one of the two departments of the historic region of Savoy that was annexed by France on 14 June 1860, following the signature of the Treaty of Turin on 24 March 1860
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