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Landsat Program
The Landsat program
Landsat program
is the longest-running enterprise for acquisition of satellite imagery of Earth. On July 23, 1972 the Earth
Earth
Resources Technology Satellite was launched. This was eventually renamed to Landsat.[1] The most recent, Landsat 8, was launched on February 11, 2013. The instruments on the Landsat satellites have acquired millions of images. The images, archived in the United States and at Landsat receiving stations around the world, are a unique resource for global change research and applications in agriculture, cartography, geology, forestry, regional planning, surveillance and education, and can be viewed through the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 'EarthExplorer' website. Landsat 7
Landsat 7
data has eight spectral bands with spatial resolutions ranging from 15 to 60 meters; the temporal resolution is 16 days.[2] Landsat images are usually divided into scenes for easy downloading
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Focal Plane
In Gaussian optics, the cardinal points consist of three pairs of points located on the optical axis of a rotationally symmetric, focal, optical system. These are the focal points, the principal points, and the nodal points.[1] For ideal systems, the basic imaging properties such as image size, location, and orientation are completely determined by the locations of the cardinal points; in fact only four points are necessary: the focal points and either the principal or nodal points. The only ideal system that has been achieved in practice is the plane mirror,[2] however the cardinal points are widely used to approximate the behavior of real optical systems
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Mauna Kea
Mauna Kea
Mauna Kea
(/ˌmɔːnə ˈkeɪ.ə/ or /ˌmaʊnə ˈkeɪ.ə/, Hawaiian: [ˈmɐwnə ˈkɛjə]), is a dormant volcano on the island of Hawaii. Standing 4,207 m (13,802 ft) above sea level, its peak is the highest point in the state of Hawaii making the island of Hawaii the second highest island in the world. Most of the mountain is underwater; when measured from its oceanic base, Mauna Kea is over 10,000 m (33,000 ft) tall and is the tallest mountain on Earth.[5] Mauna Kea
Mauna Kea
is about a million years old, and has thus passed the most active shield stage of life hundreds of thousands of years ago. In its current post-shield state, its lava is more viscous, resulting in a steeper profile
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United States Congress
535 voting members100 senators 435 representatives6 non-voting membersSenate political groups     Republican (51)      Democratic (47)      Independent (2) (caucusing with Democrats)House of Representatives political groups     Republican (238)      Democratic (193)      Vacant (4)ElectionsSenate last electionNovember 8, 2016House of Representatives last electionNovember 8, 2016Meeting place United States
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Dan Quayle
James Danforth "Dan" Quayle (born February 4, 1947) is an American politician and lawyer who served as the 44th Vice President of the United States
United States
from 1989 to 1993. He was also a U.S. Representative from 1977 to 1981 and U.S. Senator from 1981 to 1989, representing the state of Indiana. A native of Indianapolis, Indiana, Quayle spent most of his childhood living in Paradise Valley, Arizona, a suburb of Phoenix. He married Marilyn Tucker
Marilyn Tucker
in 1972 and obtained his J.D. from the Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law in 1974. He practiced law in Huntington, Indiana, with his wife before his election to the United States House of Representatives
United States House of Representatives
in 1976, aged 29. In 1980 Quayle won election to the Senate. In 1988, Vice President George H. W. Bush
George H. W

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USGS
The United States
United States
Geological Survey (USGS, formerly simply Geological Survey) is a scientific agency of the United States
United States
government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility. The USGS is a bureau of the United States
United States
Department of the Interior; it is that department's sole scientific agency. The USGS employs approximately 8,670 people[2] and is headquartered in Reston, Virginia
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Operational Land Imager
The Operational Land Imager
Operational Land Imager
(OLI) is a remote sensing instrument aboard Landsat 8, built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies
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False-color
False color
False color
(or false colour) refers to a group of color rendering methods used to display images in color which were recorded in the visible or non-visible parts of the electromagnetic spectrum. A false-color image is an image that depicts an object in colors that differ from those a photograph (a true-color image) would show. In addition, variants of false color such as pseudocolor, density slicing, and choropleths are used for information visualization of either data gathered by a single grayscale channel or data not depicting parts of the electromagnetic spectrum (e.g. elevation in relief maps or tissue types in magnetic resonance imaging).Contents1 Types of color renderings1.1 True color 1.2 False color 1.3 Pseudocolor 1.4 Density slicing 1.5 Choropleth2 False color
False color
in the arts 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksTypes of color renderings[edit] True color[edit] "True-color" redirects here
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Hawaii (island)
HawaiiSymbolsFlower Red Pua Lehua ('Ohi'a blossom)[2]Color ʻUlaʻula (red)Largest settlement HiloDemographicsPopulation 185,079 (2010)Pop. density 46 /sq mi (17.8 /km2)Hawaiʻi (English: /həˈwaɪ.i, -ji, -ʔi/ ( listen) hə-WY-(y)ee; Hawaiian: [həˈvɐjʔi]) is the largest island located in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Hawaii. It is the largest and the southeastern-most of the Hawaiian Islands, a chain of volcanic islands in the North Pacific Ocean. With an area of 4,028 square miles (10,430 km2), it has 63% of the Hawaiian archipelago's combined landmass, and is the largest island in the United States. However, it has only 13% of Hawaiʻi’s people
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Mauna Loa
Mauna Loa
Mauna Loa
(/ˌmɔːnə ˈloʊ.ə/ or /ˌmaʊnə ˈloʊ.ə/; Hawaiian: [ˈmɐwnə ˈlowə]; English: Long Mountain[3]) is one of five volcanoes that form the Island of Hawaii
Hawaii
in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Hawaiʻi in the Pacific Ocean. The largest subaerial volcano in both mass and volume, Mauna Loa
Mauna Loa
has historically been considered the largest volcano on Earth, dwarfed only by Tamu Massif. It is an active shield volcano with relatively gentle slopes, with a volume estimated at approximately 18,000 cubic miles (75,000 km3),[4] although its peak is about 120 feet (37 m) lower than that of its neighbor, Mauna Kea
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Kilauea
Kīlauea
Kīlauea
(/ˌkiːlaʊˈeɪə/, US: /ˌkɪləˈweɪə/; Hawaiian: [tiːlɐwˈwɛjə]) is a currently active shield volcano in the Hawaiian Islands, and the most active of the five volcanoes that together form the island of Hawaiʻi. Located along the southern shore of the island, the volcano is between 300,000 and 600,000 years old and emerged above sea level about 100,000 years ago. It is the second youngest product of the Hawaiian hotspot
Hawaiian hotspot
and the current eruptive center of the Hawaiian–Emperor seamount chain. Because it lacks topographic prominence and its activities historically coincided with those of Mauna Loa, Kīlauea
Kīlauea
was once thought to be a satellite of its much larger neighbor
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RCA
The RCA
RCA
Corporation was a major American electronics company, which was founded as the Radio
Radio
Corporation of America in 1919. It was initially a wholly owned subsidiary of General Electric
General Electric
(GE); however, in 1932, GE was required to divest its control as part of the settlement of an antitrust suit. At its height as an independent company, RCA
RCA
was the dominant communications firm in the United States. Beginning in the early 1920s, RCA
RCA
was a major manufacturer of radio receivers, and also developed the first national radio network, the National Broadcasting Company (NBC). It had a leading role in the introduction of black-and-white television in the 1940s and 1950s, and color television in the 1950s and 1960s
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Invar
Invar, also known generically as FeNi36 (64FeNi in the US), is a nickel–iron alloy notable for its uniquely low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE or α)
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Nickel
Nickel
Nickel
is a chemical element with symbol Ni and atomic number 28. It is a silvery-white lustrous metal with a slight golden tinge. Nickel belongs to the transition metals and is hard and ductile. Pure nickel, powdered to maximize the reactive surface area, shows a significant chemical activity, but larger pieces are slow to react with air under standard conditions because an oxide layer forms on the surface and prevents further corrosion (passivation). Even so, pure native nickel is found in Earth's crust only in tiny amounts, usually in ultramafic rocks,[4][5] and in the interiors of larger nickel–iron meteorites that were not exposed to oxygen when outside Earth's atmosphere. Meteoric nickel is found in combination with iron, a reflection of the origin of those elements as major end products of supernova nucleosynthesis
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Gold
Gold
Gold
is a chemical element with symbol Au (from Latin: aurum) and atomic number 79, making it one of the higher atomic number elements that occur naturally. In its purest form, it is a bright, slightly reddish yellow, dense, soft, malleable, and ductile metal. Chemically, gold is a transition metal and a group 11 element. It is one of the least reactive chemical elements and is solid under standard conditions. Gold
Gold
often occurs in free elemental (native) form, as nuggets or grains, in rocks, in veins, and in alluvial deposits. It occurs in a solid solution series with the native element silver (as electrum) and also naturally alloyed with copper and palladium
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Brazing
Brazing
Brazing
is a metal-joining process in which two or more metal items are joined together by melting and flowing a filler metal into the joint, the filler metal having a lower melting point than the adjoining metal. Brazing
Brazing
differs from welding in that it does not involve melting the work pieces and from soldering in using higher temperatures for a similar process, while also requiring much more closely fitted parts than when soldering. The filler metal flows into the gap between close-fitting parts by capillary action. The filler metal is brought slightly above its melting (liquidus) temperature while protected by a suitable atmosphere, usually a flux
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