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Lake Abaya
Lake Abaya
Abaya
( Abaya
Abaya
Hayk in Amharic) is a lake in the Southern Nations, Nationalities, and Peoples' Region of Ethiopia. It is located in the Main Ethiopian Rift, east of the Guge Mountains. The town of Arba Minch
Arba Minch
lies on its southwestern shore, and the southern shores are part of the Nechisar National Park. Just to the south is Lake Chamo. Savanna, known for its wildlife and birdlife surrounds the lake, which is also fished by local people. According to the Ethiopian Department of Fisheries and Aquaculture, 412 tonnes of fish are landed each year, which the department estimates is 69% of its sustainable amount.[1] Lake Abaya
Abaya
is 60 kilometers long and 20 wide,[2] with a surface area of 1162 square kilometers.[3] There are a number of islands in this lake, the largest being Aruro;[4] others include Gidicho, Welege, Galmaka, and Alkali
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Wildlife
Wildlife
Wildlife
traditionally refers to undomesticated animal species, but has come to include all plants, fungi, and other organisms that grow or live wild in an area without being introduced by humans.[1] Wildlife
Wildlife
can be found in all ecosystems. Deserts, forests, rain forests, plains, grasslands and other areas including the most developed urban areas, all have distinct forms of wildlife. While the term in popular culture usually refers to animals that are untouched by human factors, most scientists agree that much wildlife is affected by human activities.[2] Humans have historically tended to separate civilization from wildlife in a number of ways including the legal, social, and moral sense. Some animals, however, have adapted to suburban environments. This includes such animals as domesticated cats, dogs, mice, and gerbils
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Wayback Machine
The Wayback Machine
Wayback Machine
is a digital archive of the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
and other information on the Internet
Internet
created by the Internet
Internet
Archive, a nonprofit organization, based in San Francisco, California, United States.Contents1 History 2 Technical details2.1 Storage capabilities 2.2 Growth 2.3 Website exclusion policy2.3.1 Oakland Archive
Archive
Policy3 Uses3.1 In legal evidence3.1.1 Civil litigation3.1.1.1 Netbula LLC v. Chordiant Software Inc. 3.1.1.2 Telewizja Polska3.1.2 Patent law 3.1.3 Limitations of utility4 Legal status 5 Archived content legal issues5.1 Scientology 5.2 Healthcare Advocates, Inc. 5.3 Suzanne Shell 5.4 Daniel Davydiuk6 Censorship and other threats 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification
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Humbert I Of Italy
Umberto I (Italian: Umberto Ranieri Carlo Emanuele Giovanni Maria Ferdinando Eugenio di Savoia; 14 March 1844 – 29 July 1900), nicknamed the Good (Italian: il Buono), was the King of Italy
King of Italy
from 9 January 1878 until his assassination on 29 July 1900. Umberto's reign saw Italy attempt colonial expansion into the Horn of Africa, successfully gaining Eritrea
Eritrea
and Somalia
Somalia
despite being defeated by Abyssinia at the Battle of Adowa
Battle of Adowa
in 1896. In 1882, he approved the Triple Alliance with the German Empire
German Empire
and Austria-Hungary. He was deeply loathed in leftist circles because of his conservatism and support of the Bava-Beccaris massacre
Bava-Beccaris massacre
in Milan. He was especially hated by anarchists, who attempted an assassination on him during the first year of his reign
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Margherita Of Savoy
Margherita of Savoy
Margherita of Savoy
(Margherita Maria Teresa Giovanna; 20 November 1851 – 4 January 1926) was the Queen consort
Queen consort
of the Kingdom of Italy by marriage to Umberto I.Contents1 Life1.1 Early life 1.2 Crown princess 1.3 Queen 1.4 Queen dowager2 Legacy 3 Titles, styles and arms3.1 Arms and monogram4 Ancestry 5 Notes 6 External linksLife[edit] Early life[edit] Margherita was born to Prince Ferdinand, Duke of Genoa
Duke of Genoa
and Princess Elisabeth of Saxony. Her father died in 1855, and her mother remarried morganatically to Major Nicholas Rapallo. She was educated by countess Clelia Monticelli di Casalrosso and her Austrian governess Rosa Arbesser
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Alluvial Fan
An alluvial fan is a fan- or cone-shaped deposit of sediment crossed and built up by streams. If a fan is built up by debris flows it is properly called a debris cone or colluvial fan. These flows come from a single point source at the apex of the fan, and over time move to occupy many positions on the fan surface. Fans are typically found where a canyon draining from mountainous terrain emerges out onto a flatter plain, and especially along fault-bounded mountain fronts. A convergence of neighboring alluvial fans into a single apron of deposits against a slope is called a bajada.Contents1 Formation 2 In arid climates 3 In humid climates 4 Flood hazards 5 In the Solar System5.1 Mars 5.2 Titan6 Gallery 7 See also 8 References and notes 9 External linksFormation[edit] As a stream's gradient decreases, it drops coarse-grained material
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Bule Hora Town
Bule Hora Town (formerly Hagere Mariam, older, alternative names were Alga, Kuku) is a town in southern Ethiopia. Located on the paved Addis Ababa-Moyale highway, in the West Guji Zone of the Oromia Region. It is the largest town in this zone mainly inhabited by the Guji Oromo. It has a latitude and longitude of 5°35′N 38°15′E / 5.583°N 38.250°E / 5.583; 38.250 and an altitude of 1716 meters above sea level.Contents1 History 2 Demographics 3 Bule Hora University 4 NotesHistory[edit] An orthodox church dedicated to Mary (Mariam) was built in the early 1900. The name Hagere Mariam was introduced by the Amhara sometimes before 1934. In 1936 Kenyazmach Tekle Giyorgis, a nephew of Ras Desta Damtew, was the chief of the town. It was occupied by the Italians on 22 July 1936, who renamed it "Alghe"
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Bale Mountains
The Bale Mountains
Bale Mountains
(also known as the Urgoma Mountains), in the Oromia Region of southeast Ethiopia, south of the Awash River, are part of the Ethiopian Highlands. They include Tullu Demtu, the second-highest mountain in Ethiopia
Ethiopia
(4377 meters), and Mount Batu
Mount Batu
(4307 meters). The Weyib River, a tributary of the Jubba River, rises in these mountains east of Goba. The Bale Mountains National Park
Bale Mountains National Park
covers 2,200 square kilometers of these mountains. The main attractions of the park are the wild alpine scenery, and the relative ease with which visitors can see unique birds and mammals. The Bale Mountains
Bale Mountains
are home to many of Ethiopia's endemic animals, notably the Ethiopian wolf
Ethiopian wolf
(Canis simensis), found on the Sanetti Plateau
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Mount Gurage
Mount Gurage is a mountain located in central Ethiopia. It is the highest point in both the Gurage Zone and the entire Southern Nations, Nationalities, and Peoples' Region. The mountain has a latitude and longitude of 8°17′N 38°23′E / 8.283°N 38.383°E / 8.283; 38.383Coordinates: 8°17′N 38°23′E / 8.283°N 38.383°E / 8.283; 38.383 and an elevation of 3719 meters above sea level.[1] To the north is the village of Anige, while to the east is Bu'i.[2] Mount Gurage is described as part of an upwarped massif, which overlooks the Rift Valley. This massif is composed of layers of silicic lavas and tuffs, except for the summit line which is hidden by the Rift Valley tuffs
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Tonne
The tonne (/tʌn/ ( listen)) (Non-SI unit, symbol: t), commonly referred to as the metric ton in the United States, is a non-SI metric unit of mass equal to 1,000 kilograms;[1][2][3][4] or one megagram (Mg); it is equivalent to approximately 2,204.6 pounds,[5] 1.102 short tons (US) or 0.984 long tons (imperial). Although not part of the SI, the tonne is accepted for use with SI units and prefixes by the International Committee for Weights and Measures.[6]Contents1 Symbol and abbreviations 2 Origin and spelling 3 Conversions 4 Derived units 5 Alternative usage5.1 Use of mass as proxy for energy 5.2 Unit of force6 See also 7 Notes and references 8 External linksSymbol and abbreviations[edit] The SI symbol for the tonne is "t", adopted at the same time as the unit in 1879.[2] Its use is also official for the metric ton in the United States, having been adopted by the United States National Institute of Standards and Technology.[7] It
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Inflow (hydrology)
In hydrology, the inflow of a body of water is the source of the water in the body of water. It can also refer to the average volume of incoming water in unit time. It is contrasted with outflow. Overview[edit] All bodies of water have multiple inflows, but often, one inflow may predominate and be the largest source of water. However, in many cases, no single inflow will predominate and there will be multiple primary inflows. For a lake, the inflow may be a river or stream that literally flows into the lake. Inflow may also be, strictly speaking, not flows, but rather precipitation, like rain. Inflow can also be used to refer to groundwater recharge. References[edit]External links[edit] The dictionary definition of inflow at WiktionaryThis article about geography terminology is a stub
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Birdlife
BirdLife International (formerly the International Council for Bird Preservation) is a global partnership of conservation organisations that strives to conserve birds, their habitats and global biodiversity, working with people towards sustainability in the use of natural resources. It is the world's largest partnership of conservation organisations, with over 120 partner organisations.[1] It has a membership of more than 2.5 million people and partner organizations in more than 100 countries. Major partners include Britain’s Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, the Wild Bird Society of Japan, and the U.S. National Audubon Society. The group’s headquarters are located in Cambridge, UK. BirdLife International’s priorities include preventing extinction of bird species, identifying and safeguarding important sites for birds, maintaining and restoring key bird habitats, and empowering conservationists worldwide
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Savanna
A savanna or savannah is a mixed woodland grassland ecosystem characterised by the trees being sufficiently widely spaced so that the canopy does not close. The open canopy allows sufficient light to reach the ground to support an unbroken herbaceous layer consisting primarily of grasses.[1][2][3] Savannas maintain an open canopy despite a high tree density.[4] It is often believed that savannas feature widely spaced, scattered trees. However, in many savannas, tree densities are higher and trees are more regularly spaced than in forests.[5][6][7][8] The South American savanna types cerrado sensu stricto and cerrado dense typically have densities of trees similar to or higher than that found in South American tropical forests,[5][7][8] with savanna ranging from 800–3300 trees per hectare (trees/ha) and adjacent forests with 800–2000 trees/ha
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Ethiopia
Coordinates: 8°N 38°E / 8°N 38°E / 8; 38Federal Democratic Republic
Republic
of Ethiopia የኢትዮጵያ ፌዴራላዊ ዴሞክራሲያዊ ሪፐብሊክ yeʾĪtiyoṗṗya Fēdēralawī Dēmokirasīyawī RīpebilīkFlagEmblemAnthem:  ወደፊት ገስግሺ፣ ውድ እናት ኢትዮጵያ March Forward, Dear Mother EthiopiaCapital and largest city Addis Ababa 9°1′N 38°45′E / 9.017°N 38.750°E / 9.017; 38.750Official languages
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