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Lake Tai
Lake
Lake
Tai or Lake
Lake
Taihu (Chinese: 太湖, p Tài Hú, Wu: Ta Wu, lit. "Great Lake") is a large freshwater lake in the Yangtze Delta plain in Wuxi, China. The lake belongs to Jiangsu
Jiangsu
and the southern shore forms its border with Zhejiang. With an area of 2,250 square kilometers (869 sq mi) and an average depth of 2 meters (6.6 ft),[1] it is the third-largest freshwater lake in China, after Poyang and Dongting. The lake houses about 90 islands, ranging in size from a few square meters to several square kilometers. Lake
Lake
Tai is linked to the renowned Grand Canal and is the origin of a number of rivers, including Suzhou
Suzhou
Creek
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Impact Crater
An impact crater is an approximately circular depression in the surface of a planet, moon, or other solid body in the Solar System
Solar System
or elsewhere, formed by the hypervelocity impact of a smaller body. In contrast to volcanic craters, which result from explosion or internal collapse,[2] impact craters typically have raised rims and floors that are lower in elevation than the surrounding terrain.[3] Although Meteor Crater
Meteor Crater
is perhaps the best-known example of a small impact crater on Earth, impact craters range from small, simple, bowl-shaped depressions to large, complex, multi-ringed impact basins. Impact craters are the dominant geographic features on many solid Solar System
Solar System
objects including the Moon, Mercury, Callisto, Ganymede and most small moons and asteroids
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Zhejiang
 Zhejiang (help·info), formerly romanized as Chekiang, is an eastern coastal province of China. Zhejiang
Zhejiang
is bordered by Jiangsu and Shanghai
Shanghai
to the north, Anhui
Anhui
to the northwest, Jiangxi
Jiangxi
to the west, and Fujian
Fujian
to the south
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Su Shi
Su Shi
Su Shi
(8 January 1037 – 24 August 1101), also known as Su Dongpo, was a Chinese writer, poet, painter, calligrapher, pharmacologist, gastronome, and a statesman of the Song dynasty. A major personality of the Song era, Su was an important figure in Song Dynasty politics, aligning himself with Sima Guang
Sima Guang
and others, against the New Policy party led by Wang Anshi. Su Shi
Su Shi
was famed as an essayist, and his prose writings lucidly contribute to the understanding of topics such as 11th-century Chinese travel literature or detailed information on the contemporary Chinese iron industry. His poetry has a long history of popularity and influence in China, Japan, and other areas in the near vicinity and is well known in the English-speaking parts of the world through the translations by Arthur Waley, among others
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Holocene Epoch
The Holocene
Holocene
( /ˈhɒləˌsiːn, ˈhoʊ-/)[2][3] is the current geological epoch. It began after the Pleistocene[4], approximately 11,650 cal years before present.[5] The Holocene
Holocene
is part of the Quaternary
Quaternary
period. Its name comes from the Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
words ὅλος (holos, whole or entire) and καινός (kainos, new), meaning "entirely recent".[6] It has been identified with the current warm period, known as MIS 1, and is considered by some to be an interglacial period. The Holocene
Holocene
encompasses the growth and impacts of the human species worldwide, including all its written history, development of major civilizations, and overall significant transition toward urban living in the present
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East China Sea
Coordinates: 30°N 125°E / 30°N 125°E / 30; 125East China
China
SeaThe East China
China
Sea, showing surrounding regions, islands, cities, and seasChinese nameSimplified Chinese 1. 东海 2. 东中国海Traditional Chinese 1. 東海 2. 東中國海TranscriptionsStandard MandarinHanyu Pinyin 1. Dōng Hǎi 2. Dōng Zhōngguó HǎiBopomofo 1. ㄉㄨㄥ ㄏㄞˇ ㄉㄨㄥ ㄓㄨㄥ ㄍㄨㄛˊ ㄏㄞˇWuRomanization 1. ton平 he上 2. ton平 tson平 koh入 he上HakkaRomanization 1. dung24 hoi31 2. dung24 dung24 gued2 hoi31Yue: CantoneseJyutping 1. dung1 hoi2 2. dung1 zung1 gwok3 hoi2Southern Min Hokkien
Hokkien
POJ 1. tong-hái 2. tong tiong-kok háiEastern MinFuzhou BUC 1. dĕ̤ng-hāi 2
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Devonian Period
The Devonian
Devonian
is a geologic period and system of the Paleozoic, spanning 60 million years from the end of the Silurian, 419.2 million years ago (Mya), to the beginning of the Carboniferous, 358.9 Mya.[9] It is named after Devon, England, where rocks from this period were first studied. The first significant adaptive radiation of life on dry land occurred during the Devonian. Free-sporing vascular plants began to spread across dry land, forming extensive forests which covered the continents. By the middle of the Devonian, several groups of plants had evolved leaves and true roots, and by the end of the period the first seed-bearing plants appeared. Various terrestrial arthropods also became well-established. Fish
Fish
reached substantial diversity during this time, leading the Devonian
Devonian
to often be dubbed the "Age of Fish"
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China
China, officially the People's Republic
People's Republic
of China
China
(PRC), is a unitary sovereign state in East Asia
East Asia
and the world's most populous country, with a population of around 1.404 billion.[13] Covering approximately 9,600,000 square kilometers (3,700,000 sq mi), it is the third- or fourth-largest country by total area,[k][19] depending on the source consulted. China
China
also has the most neighbor countries in the world
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Microtektite
Tektites (from Greek τηκτός tēktós, "molten") are gravel-sized bodies composed of black, green, brown, or gray natural glass formed from terrestrial debris ejected during meteorite impacts. The term was coined by Austrian geologist Franz Eduard Suess
Franz Eduard Suess
(1867–1941), son of Eduard Suess.[1] They generally range in size from millimeters to centimeters
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Quartz
Quartz
Quartz
is a mineral composed of silicon and oxygen atoms in a continuous framework of SiO4 silicon–oxygen tetrahedra, with each oxygen being shared between two tetrahedra, giving an overall chemical formula of SiO2. Quartz
Quartz
is the second most abundant mineral in Earth's continental crust, behind feldspar.[7] Quartz
Quartz
crystals are chiral, and exist in two forms, the normal α-quartz and the high-temperature β-quartz. The transformation from α-quartz to β-quartz takes place abruptly at 573 °C (846 K). Since the transformation is accompanied by a significant change in volume, it can easily induce fracturing of ceramics or rocks passing through this temperature limit. There are many different varieties of quartz, several of which are semi-precious gemstones
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Shock Metamorphism
Shock metamorphism
Shock metamorphism
or impact metamorphism describes the effects of shock-wave related deformation and heating during impact events
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Shatter Cones
Shatter cones are rare geological features that are only known to form in the bedrock beneath meteorite impact craters or underground nuclear explosions. They are evidence that the rock has been subjected to a shock with pressures in the range of 2–30 GPa.[1][2][3]Contents1 Morphology 2 Photo gallery 3 See also 4 References 5 ReferencesMorphology[edit] Shatter cones have a distinctively conical shape that radiates from the top (apex) of the cones repeating cone-on-cone in large and small scales in the same sample. Sometimes they have more of a spoon shape on the side of a larger cone.[2] In finer-grained rocks such as limestone, they form an easily recognizable "horsetail" pattern with thin grooves (striae). However, the word "striae" should not be used to describe shatter cones, as that is considered misleading. Coarser grained rocks tend to yield less well developed shatter cones, which may be difficult to distinguish from other geological formations such as slickensides
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Meteor Impact
An impact event is a collision between astronomical objects causing measurable effects. Impact events have physical consequences and have been found to regularly occur in planetary systems, though the most frequent involve asteroids, comets or meteoroids and have minimal impact. When large objects impact terrestrial planets like the Earth, there can be significant physical and biospheric consequences, though atmospheres mitigate many surface impacts through atmospheric entry. Impact craters and structures are dominant landforms on many of the Solar System's solid objects and present the strongest empirical evidence for their frequency and scale. Impact events appear to have played a significant role in the evolution of the Solar System
Solar System
since its formation
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Chinese Industrialization
In the 1960s, about 60% of the Chinese Labor Force were employed in agriculture. The figure remained more or less constant throughout the early phase of industrialization between the 1960s and 1990s, but in view of the rapid population growth this amounted to a rapid growth of the industrial sector in absolute terms, of up to 8% per year during the 1970s[citation needed]
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Qiantang River
The Qiantang River
Qiantang River
(Chinese: 钱塘江; pinyin: Qiántáng jiāng, sometimes spelled Tsientang river[1]) is an East Chinese river that originates in the border region of Anhui
Anhui
and Jiangxi
Jiangxi
provinces. Its upper stretch is called the Xin'an River(新安), and the middle stretch the Fuchun River (富春). An important commercial artery, it runs for 459 kilometers (285 mi) through Zhejiang, passing through the provincial capital Hangzhou
Hangzhou
before flowing into the East China Sea via Hangzhou
Hangzhou
Bay
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Pollution In China
Pollution
Pollution
in China
China
is one aspect of the broader topic of environmental issues in China
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