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Lago De Cachi
Lake Cachi (Spanish: Lago de Cachí) is an artificial lake in central Costa Rica
Costa Rica
created by the Cachí Dam (Represa de Cachí), an arch dam north of Tapantí National Park, to the east-southeast of Cartago in Cartago Province. The main town is Cachí, away from the east bank of the lake. Built in the 1970s, it was one of the first hydroelectric projects in Costa Rica.[1] It has an installed capacity of 102 MW with three units of 34 MW capacity each (Vertical Francis turbines).[2] The project became operational with the first unit commissioned in 1966, the second unit in 1967, and the third unit in 1978.[2] The Reventazon River
Reventazon River
provides multiple benefits through the three dams built on it. Out of the three dams, Cachi Dam, not only provides power generation benefits but also controls floods, and recreational facilities in the Lake Cachi
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Costa Rica
Coordinates: 10°N 84°W / 10°N 84°W / 10; -84Republic of Costa Rica República de Costa Rica  (Spanish)FlagCoat of armsAnthem: "Noble patria, tu hermosa bandera" (Spanish) "Noble motherland, your beautiful flag"Capital and largest city San José 9°56′N 84°5′W / 9.933°N 84.083°W / 9.933; -84.083Official languages SpanishRecognized regional languagesMekatelyu Bribri PatoisEthnic groups (2011[2])83.6% White/Castizo or Mestizo 6.7% Mulatto 2.4% Amerindian 1.1% Black (of African descent) 6.2% Others[1]Religion Roman CatholicismDemonymCosta Rican Tico(a)Government Unitary presidential constitutional republic• PresidentLuis Guillermo Solís• 1st Vice-PresidentHelio Fallas Venegas• 2nd Vice-PresidentAna Helena Chacón EcheverríaLegislature Legislative Assembly<
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Atlantic Ocean
The Atlantic Ocean
Ocean
is the second largest of the world's oceans with a total area of about 106,460,000 square kilometers (41,100,000 square miles).[2][3] It covers approximately 20 percent of the Earth's surface and about 29 percent of its water surface area. It separates the "Old World" from the "New World". The Atlantic Ocean
Ocean
occupies an elongated, S-shaped basin extending longitudinally between Eurasia
Eurasia
and Africa to the east, and the Americas to the west. As one component of the interconnected global ocean, it is connected in the north to the Arctic
Arctic
Ocean, to the Pacific Ocean
Ocean
in the southwest, the Indian Ocean
Ocean
in the southeast, and the Southern Ocean
Southern Ocean
in the south (other definitions describe the Atlantic as extending southward to Antarctica)
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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San José, Costa Rica
San José (literally meaning "Saint Joseph", pronounced [saŋ hoˈse]) is the capital and largest city of Costa Rica. Located in the mid-west of the Central Valley, San José is the seat of national government, the focal point of political and economic activity, and the major transportation hub of this Central American nation. The population of San José Canton
San José Canton
was 288,054 in 2011,[3] and San José’s municipal land area measures 44.2 square kilometers (17.2 square miles), and an estimated 333,980 residents in 2015.[4] The metropolitan area stretches beyond the canton limits and has an estimated population of over 2 million in 2017.[5] The city is named in honor of Joseph of Nazareth. Though few people live in the city center, it is the most important working area of the country, which brings in more than a million people daily
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Water Hyacinths
Eichhornia crassipes, commonly known as common water hyacinth, is an aquatic plant native to the Amazon basin, and is often a highly problematic invasive species outside its native range.Contents1 Description 2 Habitat and ecology 3 Invasive species3.1 United States 3.2 Africa 3.3 Asia 3.4 Europe4 Control4.1 Chemical control 4.2 Physical control 4.3 Biological control5 Uses5.1 Bioenergy 5.2 Phytoremediation, waste water treatment 5.3 Edibility 5.4 Medicinal use 5.5 Potential as bioherbicidal agent 5.6 Other uses6 Gallery 7 References 8 External linksDescription[edit] Water hyacinth is a free-floating perennial aquatic plant (or hydrophyte) native to tropical and sub-tropical South America. With broad, thick, glossy, ovate leaves, water hyacinth may rise above the surface of the water as much as 1 meter in height. The leaves are 10–20 cm across, and float above the water surface. They have long, spongy and bulbous stalks
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Biota (ecology)
A biome /ˈbaɪoʊm/ is a community of plants and animals that have common characteristics for the environment they exist in. They can be found over a range of continents. Biomes are distinct biological communities that have formed in response to a shared physical climate.[1][2] "Biome" is a broader term than "habitat"; any biome can comprise a variety of habitats. While a biome can cover large areas, a microbiome is a mix of organisms that coexist in a defined space on a much smaller scale. For example, the human microbiome is the collection of bacteria, viruses, and other microorganisms that are present on a human body.[3] A 'biota' is the total collection of organisms of a geographic region or a time period, from local geographic scales and instantaneous temporal scales all the way up to whole-planet and whole-timescale spatiotemporal scales
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Thalweg
In geography and fluvial geomorphology, a thalweg or talweg (/ˈtɑːlvɛɡ/) is the line of lowest elevation within a valley or watercourse.[1] Under international law, a thalweg is the middle of the primary navigable channel of a waterway that defines the boundary line between states.[2][3] Also under international law, thalwegs can acquire special significance because disputed river borders are often deemed to run along the river's thalweg.Contents1 Etymology 2 Hydrology 3 Real world application 4 Thalweg
Thalweg
principle 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksEtymology[edit] The word thalweg is of 19th-century German origin. The German word Thalweg
Thalweg
(modern spelling Talweg) is a compound noun that is built from the German elements Thal (since Duden's orthography reform of 1901 written Tal) meaning valley, and Weg, meaning way
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World Bank
The World Bank
World Bank
(French: Banque mondiale)[2] is an international financial institution that provides loans[3] to countries of the world for capital projects. It comprises two institutions: the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD), and the International Development Association (IDA)
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1991 Limon Earthquake
The 1991 Costa Rica earthquake, also known as Limon earthquake or Bocas del Toro earthquake, occurred at 3:57 pm local time (21:56:51 UTC) on April 22. The epicenter of the 7.7 Mw earthquake was in Pandora, Valle La Estrella, in the Caribbean region of Limon, Costa Rica, 225 kilometres (140 mi) southeast of San José. The earthquake was the strongest recorded in Costa Rica's history, and was felt throughout the country as well as in western Panama.[3][4]Contents1 Damage 2 Aftermath 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksDamage[edit] The earthquake claimed 48 lives in Costa Rica and 79 in Bocas del Toro, Panama. Roads and bridges between Limon and Sixaola were all destroyed, and the epicentral region was only accessible by helicopter from the Panamaian side.[5] In Limon, hotels and other landmarks collapsed and 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in) of uplift at the waterfront left coral and sand bluffs exposed
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Ujarras
Ujarrás is a village and historical site in the Orosí Valley of Cartago Province in central Costa Rica, southeast of the provincial capital of Cartago. It lies near the northeastern bank of the man-made Lake Cachí, created by the damming of the Reventazon River. The dam lies adjacent to the village. The village is connected to Cachí, on the other side of the lake.Contents1 Geography 2 History 3 Church restoration 4 Heritage status 5 ReferencesGeography[edit] Ujarrás is located in a deep valley northeast of the town of Orosí, on the banks of the Cachí Reservoir. The valley of Orosi, which is crisscrossed by many rivers and streams, has coffee and flower plantations
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Hydroelectric
Hydroelectricity
Hydroelectricity
is electricity produced from hydropower. In 2015 hydropower generated 16.6% of the world's total electricity and 70% of all renewable electricity,[1] and was expected to increase about 3.1% each year for the next 25 years. Hydropower
Hydropower
is produced in 150 countries, with the Asia-Pacific
Asia-Pacific
region generating 33 percent of global hydropower in 2013. China
China
is the largest hydroelectricity producer, with 920 TWh
TWh
of production in 2013, representing 16.9 percent of domestic electricity use. The cost of hydroelectricity is relatively low, making it a competitive source of renewable electricity. The hydro station consumes no water, unlike coal or gas plants. The average cost of electricity from a hydro station larger than 10 megawatts is 3 to 5 U.S
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Cachí, Costa Rica
Cachí is a small town in the Orosí Valley of Cartago Province, central Costa Rica, southeast of the provincial capital of Cartago. It lies near the eastern bank of the man-made Lake Cachí, created by the damming of the Reventazon River which before the 1970s flowed past the town. The town is connected to Ujarrás, on the other side the lake. Landmarks[edit] The town lies in an area rich with green coffee plantations, with a sugar mill dated to the early twentieth century. Of note is a wooden house built by Macedonio Quesada, the noted Tico wood carver and sculptor who named the house Casa del Sonador or Dreamer’s House, made entirely from coffee branches and bamboo.[1] The main restaurant of note is La Casona del Cafetal Restaurant.[1] Cachí' contains an Evangelical Church called Espiritu de Vida. The town is divided into several neighborhoods including Calle Boza, Pueblo Nuevo, Loaisa, Penas Blancas, Primavera, and Volio
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