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LED Lighting
A LED lamp
LED lamp
or LED light bulb is an electric light for use in light fixtures that produces light using light-emitting diode (LED)
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Edison Screw
Edison screw
Edison screw
(ES) is a standard socket for light bulbs in North America. It was developed by Thomas Edison
Thomas Edison
and was licensed in 1909 under the Mazda trademark. Normally, the bulbs have right-hand threaded metal bases (caps) which screw into matching threaded sockets (lamp holders). For bulbs powered by AC current, the thread is connected to neutral and the contact on the bottom tip of the base is connected to live. In North America
North America
and continental Europe, Edison screws displaced other socket types for general lighting. In the early days of electrification, Edison screws were the only standard connector, and appliances other than bulbs were connected to AC power via light sockets
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Parabolic Aluminized Reflector Light
A parabolic aluminized reflector lamp (also PARCAN light, PARcan, or simply PAR) is a type of electric lamp that is widely used in commercial, residential, and transportation illumination. Usage includes locomotive headlamps, aircraft landing lights, and residential and commercial recessed lights ("cans" in the United States). They are identical in principle to sealed beam automobile headlights. This article covers only their use in stage lighting
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World Energy Resources
World energy resources
World energy resources
are the estimated maximum capacity for energy production given all available resources on Earth. They can be divided by type into fossil fuel, nuclear fuel and renewable resources.Contents1 Fossil fuel1.1 Coal 1.2 Natural gas 1.3 Oil 1.4 Sustainability2 Nuclear fuel2.1 Nuclear energy 2.2 Nuclear fusion3 Renewable resources3.1 Solar energy 3.2 Wind power 3.3 Wave and tidal power 3.4 Geothermal 3.5 Biomass 3.6 Hydropower4 ReferencesFossil fuel[edit] Main article: Fossil fuel Remaining reserves of fossil fuel are estimated as:[3]Fuel Proven energy reserves in ZJ (end of 2009)Coal   19.8Gas   36.4Oil   8.9These are the proven energy reserves; real reserves may be up to a factor 4 larger. Significant uncertainty exists for these numbers. Estimating the remaining fossil fuels on the planet depends on a detailed understanding of Earth's crust
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Global Warming
Global warming, also referred to as climate change, is the observed century-scale rise in the average temperature of the Earth's climate system and its related effects.[1][2] Multiple lines of scientific evidence show that the climate system is warming.[3][4][5] Many of the observed changes since the 1950s are unprecedented in the instrumental temperature record which extends back to the mid-19th century, and in paleoclimate proxy records covering thousands of years.[6] In 2013, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate
Climate
Change (IPCC) Fifth Assessment Report concluded that "It is extremely likely that human influence has been the dominant cause of the observed warming since the mid-20th century."[7] The largest human influence has been the emission of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide
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Fossil Fuel
A fossil fuel is a fuel formed by natural processes, such as anaerobic decomposition of buried dead organisms, containing energy originating in ancient photosynthesis.[1] The age of the organisms and their resulting fossil fuels is typically millions of years, and sometimes exceeds 650 million years.[2] Fossil
Fossil
fuels contain high percentages of carbon and include petroleum, coal, and natural gas.[3] Other commonly used derivatives include kerosene and propane. Fossil
Fossil
fuels range from volatile materials with low carbon to hydrogen ratios like methane, to liquids like petroleum, to nonvolatile materials composed of almost pure carbon, like anthracite coal
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Nichia
Nichia
Nichia
Corporation (日亜化学工業株式会社, Nichia
Nichia
Kagaku Kōgyō Kabushiki-gaisha) is a Japanese chemical engineering and manufacturing company headquartered in Anan, Japan with global subsidiaries. It specializes in the manufacturing and distribution of phosphors, including light-emitting diodes (LEDs), laser diodes, battery materials, and calcium chloride.[3] The Nichia
Nichia
Corporation comprises two divisions — Division 1, responsible for phosphors and other chemicals, and Division 2, responsible for LEDs. In the field of phosphors the company has 50% of the Japanese market and 25% of the world market.[1][4] Nichia
Nichia
is the world’s largest supplier of LEDs. It designs, manufactures, and markets LEDs for display, LCD backlighting, automotive and general lighting applications with the many different leds across the entire visible spectrum
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Isamu Akasaki
Isamu Akasaki
Isamu Akasaki
(赤崎 勇, Akasaki Isamu, born January 30, 1929) is a Japanese physicist, specializing in the field of semiconductor technology and Nobel Prize
Nobel Prize
laureate, best known for inventing the bright gallium nitride (GaN
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Hiroshi Amano
Hiroshi Amano
Hiroshi Amano
(天野 浩, Amano Hiroshi, born September 11, 1960) is a Japanese physicist and inventor specializing in the field of semiconductor technology. For his work he was awarded the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physics together with Isamu Akasaki
Isamu Akasaki
and Shuji Nakamura
Shuji Nakamura
for "the invention of efficient blue light-emitting diodes which has enabled bright and energy-saving white light sources".[2]Contents1 Early life and education 2 Career 3 Awards 4 Honors 5 Family 6 Selected publications 7 See also 8 ReferencesEarly life and education[edit]with Shinzō Abe
Shinzō Abe
(at the Prime Minister's Official Residence
Prime Minister's Official Residence
on October 22, 2014)Amano was born in Hamamatsu, Japan, on September 11, 1960
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Nobel Prize In Physics
The Nobel Prize
Nobel Prize
in Physics
Physics
(Swedish: Nobelpriset i fysik) is a yearly award given by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences
Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences
for those who conferred the most outstanding contributions for mankind in the field of physics
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United States Department Of Energy
The United States
United States
Department of Energy
Energy
(DOE) is a cabinet-level department of the United States
United States
Government concerned with the United States' policies regarding energy and safety in handling nuclear material. Its responsibilities include the nation's nuclear weapons program, nuclear reactor production for the United States
United States
Navy, energy conservation, energy-related research, radioactive waste disposal, and domestic energy production. It also directs research in genomics; the Human Genome Project
Human Genome Project
originated in a DOE initiative.[3] DOE sponsors more research in the physical sciences than any other U.S
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L Prize
The L Prize
L Prize
(aka the Bright Tomorrow Lighting
Lighting
Prize) is a competition run by the United States Department of Energy
United States Department of Energy
aimed to "spur lighting manufacturers to develop high-quality, high-efficiency solid-state lighting products to replace the common incandescent light bulb".[1] The competition, launched in May 2008 at Lightfair, offers two prizes for the replacement of two types of bulb, an A19 60-watt incandescent light bulb and a PAR 38
PAR 38
halogen incandescent bulb
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Philips
Koninklijke Philips
Philips
N.V. (Philips, stylized as PHILIPS) is a Dutch technology company headquartered in Amsterdam
Amsterdam
currently focused in the area of healthcare. It was founded in Eindhoven
Eindhoven
in 1891, by Gerard Philips
Philips
and his father Frederik. It was once one of the largest electronic conglomerates in the world and currently employs around 105,000 people across more than 60 countries.[1] Philips
Philips
is organized into three main divisions: Philips
Philips
Consumer Lifestyle (formerly Philips
Philips
Consumer Electronics and Philips
Philips
Domestic Appliances and Personal Care), Philips
Philips
Healthcare
Healthcare
(formerly Philips Medical Systems) and Philips
Philips
Lighting
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Watt
The watt (symbol: W) is a unit of power. In the International System of Units (SI) it is defined as a derived unit of 1 joule per second,[1] and is used to quantify the rate of energy transfer
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Chromaticity
Chromaticity
Chromaticity
is an objective specification of the quality of a color regardless of its luminance. Chromaticity
Chromaticity
consists of two independent parameters, often specified as hue (h) and colorfulness (s), where the latter is alternatively called saturation, chroma, intensity,[1] or excitation purity.[2][3] This number of parameters follows from trichromacy of vision of most humans, which is assumed by most models in color science.Contents1 Quantitative description 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksQuantitative description[edit] In color science, the white point of an illuminant or of a display is a neutral reference characterized by a chromaticity; all other chromaticities may be defined in relation to this reference using polar coordinates
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National Institute Of Standards And Technology
The National Institute of Standards and Technology
Technology
(NIST) is a measurement standards laboratory, and a non-regulatory agency of the United States Department of Commerce
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