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Kumbh Mela
Kumbh Mela
Kumbh Mela
or Kumbha
Kumbha
Mela (/ˌkʊm ˈmeɪlə/ or /ˌkʊm məˈlɑː/), inscribed on the UNESCO's Representative List of Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity,[1] is a mass Hindu pilgrimage of faith in which Hindus gather to bathe in a sacred or holy river. Traditionally, four fairs are widely recognized as the Kumbh Melas: the Haridwar
Haridwar
Kumbh Mela, the Allahabad
Allahabad
Kumbh Mela, the Nashik-Trimbakeshwar Simhastha, and Ujjain
Ujjain
Simhastha. These four fairs are held periodically at one of the following places by rotation: Haridwar, Allahabad
Allahabad
(Prayaga), Nashik
Nashik
district ( Nashik
Nashik
and Trimbak), and Ujjain
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Khulasat-ut-Tawarikh
Khulasat-ut-Tawarikh is an Indian Persian language chronicle by Sujan Rai. It deals with the history of Hindustan, and also contains details about the contemporary Mughal Empire. The author completed the work in 1695 CE, during the reign of Aurangzeb. An insertion about Aurangzeb's death was later added to the original copy by a transcriber. Alternative transliterations of the book's title include Khulasat-Al-Tavarikh and Khulasatu-t-Tawarikh.Contents1 Authorship and date 2 Contents2.1 Preface 2.2 Geography of India during Aurangzeb's reign 2.3 Hindu kings of India 2.4 Muslim kings of India 2.5 Auraganzeb's death3 Editio princeps 4 References 5 External linksAuthorship and date[edit] The author's name is not given anywhere in the actual book, but the transcribers' notes in several manuscripts mention him as Sujan Rai. Some manuscripts appened Bhandari or Batalvi to his name.[1] The title Munshi is also prefixed to his name
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Deva (Hinduism)
Deva (/ˈdeɪvə/; Sanskrit: देव, Devá) means "heavenly, divine, anything of excellence", and is also one of the terms for a deity in Hinduism.[1] Deva is a masculine term; the feminine equivalent is devi. In the earliest Vedic literature, all supernatural beings are called Asuras.[2][3] The concepts and legends evolve in ancient Indian literature, and by the late Vedic period, benevolent supernatural beings are referred to as Deva-Asuras
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Leo (astrology)
Leo (♌) (Greek: Λέων, Leōn), is the fifth astrological sign of the zodiac, originating from the constellation of Leo. It comes after Cancer (Greek: Καρκίνος, Karkinos) and before Virgo (Greek: Παρθένος, Parthenos). Under the tropical zodiac, the Sun transits this area approximately between July 23 and August 22;[2] the sign spans the 120th to 150th degree of celestial longitude. Leo is a fixed sign along with Taurus, Scorpio, and Aquarius. Under the tropical zodiac, the Sun transits this area on average between July 23 and August 22 each year, and under the sidereal zodiac, the Sun currently transits this area from approximately August 16 to September 15.[3] The symbol of the lion is based on the Nemean lion, a lion with an impenetrable hide.[4] It is a northern sign and its opposite southern sign is Aquarius.[2][5] References[edit]^ Astronomical Applications Department 2011. ^ a b "Leo". Encyclopædia Britannica. United States: Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc
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Kumbakonam
Kumbakonam, also spelt as Coombaconum or Combaconum[1] in the records of British India, is a town and a special grade municipality in the Thanjavur district
Thanjavur district
in the southeast Indian state of Tamil Nadu. It is located 40 km (25 mi) from Thanjavur
Thanjavur
and 273 km (170 mi) from Chennai
Chennai
and is the headquarters of the Kumbakonam taluk of Thanjavur
Thanjavur
district. The town is bounded by two rivers, the Kaveri River
Kaveri River
to the north and Arasalar River to the south. According to the 2011 census, Kumbakonam
Kumbakonam
has a population of 140,156 and has a strong Hindu majority; but it also has sizeable Muslim and Christian populations
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Vishnu
Vishnu
Vishnu
( Sanskrit
Sanskrit
pronunciation: [vɪʂɳu]; Sanskrit: विष्णु, IAST: Viṣṇu) is one of the principal deities of Hinduism, and the Supreme Being
Supreme Being
in its Vaishnavism
Vaishnavism
tradition.[5][6] Vishnu
Vishnu
is the "preserver" in the Hindu
Hindu
trinity (Trimurti) that includes Brahma
Brahma
and Shiva.[7] In Vaishnavism, Vishnu
Vishnu
is identical to the formless metaphysical concept called Brahman, the supreme, the Svayam Bhagavan, who takes various avatars as "the preserver, protector" whenever the world is threatened with evil, chaos, and destructive forces.[8] His avatars most notably include Rama
Rama
in the Ramayana
Ramayana
and Krishna
Krishna
in the Mahabharata
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Amrita
Amrita
Amrita
(Sanskrit: अमृत, IAST: amṛta), Amrith or Amata, is a word that literally means "immortality" and is often referred to in texts as nectar. “Amṛta” is etymologically related to the Greek ambrosia[1] and carries the same meaning.[2] Its first occurrence is in the Rigveda, where it is considered one of several synonyms for soma, the drink of the devas. Amrit has varying significance in different Indian religions. The word Amrit is also a common first name for Sikhs and North Indian Hindus, while its feminine form is Amritā
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Schwa Deletion In Indo-Aryan Languages
Schwa
Schwa
deletion, or schwa syncope, is a phenomenon that sometimes occurs in Hindi, Urdu, Bengali, Kashmiri, Punjabi, Gujarati, Maithili and several other Indo-Aryan languages
Indo-Aryan languages
with schwas that are implicit in their written scripts. Languages like Marathi with increased influence of other languages through coming into contact with them also shows similar phenomenon. Some schwas are obligatorily deleted in pronunciation even if the script suggests otherwise.[1][2] Schwa
Schwa
deletion is important for intelligibility and unaccented speech. It also presents a challenge to non-native speakers and speech synthesis software because the scripts, including Devanagari, do not tell when schwas should be deleted.[3] For example, the Sanskrit
Sanskrit
word "Rāma" (IPA: [rɑːmə], राम) is pronounced "Rām" (IPA: [rɑːm], राम्) in Hindi
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Sanskrit
A few attempts at revival have been reported in Indian and Nepalese newspapers. India: 14,135 Indians claimed Sanskrit
Sanskrit
to be their mother tongue in the 2001 Census of India:[2] Nepal: 1,669 Nepalis
Nepalis
in 2011
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Amavasya
Amāvásyā (Sanskrit: अमावस्या) means New moon
New moon
lunar phase in Sanskrit. The word Amāvásyā is common to almost all Nepalese and Indian languages as most of them are derived from Sanskrit
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Hindu Mythology
ArtsBharatanatyam Kathak Kathakali Kuchipudi Manipuri Mohiniyattam Odissi Sattriya Bhagavata Mela Yakshagana Dandiya Raas Carnatic musicRites of passageGarbhadhana Pumsavana Simantonayana Jatakarma Namakarana Nishkramana Annaprashana Chudakarana Karnavedha Vidyarambha Upanayana Keshanta Ritushuddhi Samavartana Vivaha AntyeshtiAshrama DharmaAshrama: Brahmacharya Grihastha Vanaprastha SannyasaFestivalsDiwali Holi Shivaratri Navaratri Durga
Durga
Puja Ramlila Vijayadashami-DussehraRaksha Bandhan Ganesh Chat
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Asura
Asuras (Sanskrit: असुर) are a class of divine beings or power-seeking deities related to the more benevolent devas (also known as suras) in Hindu mythology. Asuras are sometimes considered nature spirits. They battle constantly with the devas.[1] Asuras are described in Indian texts as powerful superhuman demigods or demons with good or bad qualities. The good Asuras are called Adityas and are led by Varuna, while the malevolent ones are called Danavas and are led by Vritra.[2] In the earliest layer of Vedic texts Agni, Indra
Indra
and other gods are also called Asuras, in the sense of them being "lords" of their respective domains, knowledge and abilities. In later Vedic and post-Vedic texts, the benevolent gods are called Devas, while malevolent Asuras compete against these Devas and are considered "enemy of the gods" or demons.[3] Asuras are part of Indian mythology along with Devas, Yakshas (nature spirits) and Rakshasas (ghosts, ogres)
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Jyotisha
DivisionsSamhita Brahmana Aranyaka UpanishadsUpanishads Rig vedicAitareya KaushitakiSama vedicChandogya KenaYajur vedicBrihadaranyaka Isha Taittiriya Katha Shvetashvatara MaitriAtharva vedicMundaka Mandukya PrashnaOther scripturesBhagavad Gita AgamasRelated Hindu
Hindu
textsVedangasShiksha Chandas Vyakarana Nirukta Kalpa JyotishaPuranas Brahma
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Dhanavantari
ArtsBharatanatyam Kathak Kathakali Kuchipudi Manipuri Mohiniyattam Odissi Sattriya Bhagavata Mela Yakshagana Dandiya Raas Carnatic musicRites of passageGarbhadhana Pumsavana Simantonayana Jatakarma Namakarana Nishkramana Annaprashana Chudakarana Karnavedha Vidyarambha Upanayana Keshanta Ritushuddhi Samavartana Vivaha AntyeshtiAshrama DharmaAshrama: Brahmacharya Grihastha Vanaprastha SannyasaFestivalsDiwali Holi Shivaratri NavaratriDurga Puja Ramlila Vijayadashami-DussehraRaksha Bandhan Ganesh Chaturthi Vasant Panchami Rama Navami Janmashtami Onam Makar Sankranti Kumbha Mela Pongal Ugadi VaisakhiBihu Puthandu VishuRatha YatraGurus, saints, philosophersAncientAgastya Angiras Aruni Ashtavakra Atri Bharadwaja Gotama Jamadagni Jaimini Kanada Kapila Kashyapa Pāṇini Patanjali Raikva Satyakama Jabala Valmiki Vashistha Vishvamitra Vyasa YajnavalkyaMedievalNayanars Alvars Adi Shank
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Garuda
The Garuda
Garuda
is a legendary bird or bird-like creature found in Hindu, Buddhist and Jain
Jain
mythology.[1][2][3] He is variously the vehicle mount (vahana) of the Hindu god Vishnu, a dharma-protector and Astasena in Buddhism, and the Yaksha of the Jain
Jain
Tirthankara Shantinatha.[2][3][4] Garuda
Garuda
is described as the king of birds and a Kite-like figure.[5][6] He is shown either in zoomorphic form (giant bird with partially open wings) or an anthropomorphic form (man with wings and some bird features). Garuda
Garuda
is generally a protector with power to swiftly go anywhere, ever watchful and an enemy of the serpent.[1][6][7] He is also known as Tarkshya and Vynateya.[8] Garuda
Garuda
is a part of state insignia in India, Myanmar, Thailand, Cambodia
Cambodia
and Indonesia
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Indra
Indra
Indra
(/ˈɪndrə/, Sanskrit: इन्द्र) is a Vedic deity in Hinduism,[1] a guardian deity in Buddhism,[2] and the king of the highest heaven called Saudharmakalpa in Jainism.[3] His mythologies and powers are similar, though not identical to those of the Indo-European deities such as Zeus, Jupiter, Perun, Thor, and Odin (Wotan).[1][4][5] In the Vedas, Indra
Indra
is the king of Svarga
Svarga
(Heaven) and the Devas. He is the god of the heavens, lightning, thunder, storms, rains and river flows.[6] Indra
Indra
is the most referred to deity in the Rigveda.[7] He is celebrated for his powers, and the one who kills the great symbolic evil (Asura) named Vritra
Vritra
who obstructs human prosperity and happiness
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