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Kubotan
Kubotan
Kubotan
(sometimes erroneously spelled as kubaton or kobutan) is a genericized trademark for a self-defense keychain weapon developed by Sōke Takayuki Kubota
Takayuki Kubota
in the late 1960s. It is typically no more than 5.5 inches (14 centimetres) long and about half an inch (1.25 centimetres) in diameter, slightly thicker or the same size as a marker pen. The material is usually of a hard high-impact plastic (e.g. Lexan). The body of the Kubotan
Kubotan
is lined with six round grooves with a screw eye or swivel and split ring attachment at one end for keys. In addition, it is widely used as a self defense weapon.Contents1 History 2 Concept 3 Legality 4 Trademark 5 Books 6 Films 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] The Kubotan
Kubotan
keychain was originally based on a small bamboo weapon called the "hashi stick", an invention by Kubota's father Denjiro
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Generic Trademark
A generic trademark, also known as a genericized trademark or proprietary eponym, is a trademark or brand name that, due to its popularity or significance, has become the generic name for, or synonymous with, a general class of product or service, usually against the intentions of the trademark's holder. The process of a product's name becoming genericized is known as genericide.[1] A trademark is said to become genericized when it begins as a distinctive product identifier but changes in meaning to become generic. This typically happens when the products or services with which the trademark is associated have acquired substantial market dominance or mind share, such that the primary meaning of the genericized trademark becomes the product or service itself rather than an indication of source for the product or service
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Radius Bone
The radius or radial bone is one of the two large bones of the forearm, the other being the ulna. It extends from the lateral side of the elbow to the thumb side of the wrist and runs parallel to the ulna. The radius is shorter and smaller than the ulna. It is a long bone, prism-shaped and slightly curved longitudinally. The radius is part of two joints: the elbow and the wrist. At the elbow, it joins with the capitulum of the humerus, and in a separate region, with the ulna at the radial notch. At the wrist, the radius forms a joint with the ulna bone. The corresponding bone in the lower leg is the tibia.Contents1 Structure1.1 Near the wrist 1.2 Body 1.3 Near the elbow 1.4 Development2 Function2.1 Muscle attachments3 Clinical significance3.1 Fracture4 History 5 Other animals 6 Gallery 7 See also 8 ReferencesStructure[edit] The long narrow medullary cavity is enclosed in a strong wall of compact bone
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BBC News
BBC
BBC
News is an operational business division[1] of the British Broadcasting
Broadcasting
Corporation (BBC) responsible for the gathering and broadcasting of news and current affairs
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Government Of The United Kingdom
Her Majesty's Government, commonly referred to as the UK government or British government, is the central government of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland.[3][4] The government is led by the Prime Minister, who selects all the remaining ministers. The prime minister and the other most senior ministers belong to the supreme decision-making committee, known as the Cabinet.[4] The government ministers all sit in Parliament, and are accountable to it. The government is dependent on Parliament to make primary legislation,[5] and since the Fixed-terms Parliaments Act 2011, general elections are held every five years to elect a new House of Commons, unless there is a successful vote of no confidence in the government or a two-thirds vote for a snap election (as was the case in 2017) in the House of Commons, in which case an election may be held sooner
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Transportation Security Administration
The Transportation Security Administration
Transportation Security Administration
(TSA) is an agency of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security
U.S. Department of Homeland Security
that has authority over the security of the traveling public in the United States
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Counterfeit Consumer Goods
Counterfeit
Counterfeit
consumer goods are goods, often of inferior quality, made or sold under another's brand name without the brand owner’s authorization. Sellers of such goods may infringe on either the trade mark, patent or copyright of the brand owner by passing off its goods as made by the brand owner.[1]:3 The term knockoff is often used interchangeably with "counterfeit", although their legal meanings are not identical. A "knockoff" is a colloquial term which describes products that copy or imitate the physical appearance of other products but which do not copy the brand name or logo of a trademark. They may, or may not, be illegal under trademark laws.[2] Such products are considered illegal when they are intended to confuse consumers
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Pressure Point
A pressure point (Chinese: 穴位; Japanese: kyūsho 急所 "vital point, tender spot";[1] Sinhala: නිල/මර්ම ස්ථාන Nila/Marma Sthana (in Angampora); Telugu: మర్మ స్థానం Marma Sthanam; Malayalam: മര്‍മ്മം marmam; Tamil: வர்மம் varmam) derives from the meridian points in Traditional Chinese Medicine
Traditional Chinese Medicine
and Indian Ayurveda
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Icepick Grip
The icepick grip, otherwise known as the "reverse grip", is a technique used in close range knifefighting, in which the blade protrudes from the bottom of the hand, rather than the top[1][2][3] ("natural" or "hammer" grip) of the closed fist, resembling the way one would normally use an icepick for its intended use; colloquially referred to as the "stabbing" grip. Up until the late 1980s, the consensus amongst most martial arts experts was that the icepick grip was the mark of an amateur, and that one who chose to attack using such a grip was easily disarmed. This argument was not entirely without merit, as many impulsive and unskilled knife attacks feature a wild downward thrust in which the knife is gripped in this manner
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Solar Plexus
The celiac plexus or coeliac plexus, also known as the solar plexus because of its radiating nerve fibers,[1] is a complex network of nerves (a nerve plexus) located in the abdomen, near where the celiac trunk, superior mesenteric artery, and renal arteries branch from the abdominal aorta. It is behind the stomach and the omental bursa, and in front of the crura of the diaphragm, on the level of the first lumbar vertebra. The plexus is formed in part by the greater and lesser splanchnic nerves of both sides, and fibers from the anterior and posterior vagal trunks. The celiac plexus proper consists of the celiac ganglia with a network of interconnecting fibers
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LAPD
Coordinates: 34°03′07″N 118°14′40″W / 34.0519°N 118.2445°W / 34.0519; -118.2445City of Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Police
Police
DepartmentCommon name
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Edward M. Davis
Edward Michael Davis (November 15, 1916 – April 22, 2006) was the chief of the Los Angeles Police Department
Los Angeles Police Department
from 1969–1978, and later a California
California
State Senator from 1980–1992 and an unsuccessful Republican candidate for the United States Senate
United States Senate
in 1986. Davis' name was familiar to a generation of Americans since it appeared on its own card for "technical advice" in the closing credits of the popular television programs Dragnet (1967–70) and Adam-12
Adam-12
(1968–75). Born in Los Angeles, California
Los Angeles, California
to James Leonard Davis and Lillian Fox Davis, Davis graduated from John C. Fremont High School
John C. Fremont High School
in Los Angeles
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Polycarbonate
Polycarbonates (PC) are a group of thermoplastic polymers containing carbonate groups in their chemical structures. Polycarbonates used in engineering are strong, tough materials, and some grades are optically transparent. They are easily worked, molded, and thermoformed. Because of these properties, polycarbonates find many applications. Polycarbonates do not have a unique resin identification code (RIC) and are identified as "Other", 7 on the RIC list
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Sōke
Sōke (宗家), pronounced [soːke], is a Japanese term that means "the head family [house]."[1] In the realm of Japanese traditional arts, it is used synonymously with the term iemoto.[2] Thus, it is often used to indicate "headmaster" (or sometimes translated as "head of the family" or even "grand master".) The English translation of sōke as "grand master" is not a literal translation but it does see use by some Japanese sources. It can mean one who is the leader of any school or the master of a style, but it is most commonly used as a highest level Japanese title, referring to the singular leader of a school or style of martial art
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