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Koro Sea
The Koro Sea
Sea
or Sea
Sea
of Koro is a sea in the Pacific Ocean
Pacific Ocean
between Viti Levu island, Fiji
Fiji
to the west and the Lau Islands
Lau Islands
to the east, surrounded by the islands of the Fijian archipelago. It is named after Koro Island. References[edit]^ Murray, Lorraine (2 November 2009). "Koro Sea". Encyclopædia Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.
Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.
Retrieved 8 September 2013. Further reading[edit]Hocart, Arthur Maurice (1915). "Ethnographical sketch of Fiji". Man. Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland. 15: 76–77. doi:10.2307/2788875. JSTOR 2788875. Retrieved 8 September 2013.  Kontynenty i państwa: Australazja, Antarktyka (in Polish). Kraków: Fogra. 2000. pp. 239–240
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Fiji
Fiji
Fiji
(/ˈfiːdʒiː/ ( listen) FEE-jee; Fijian: Viti [ˈβitʃi]; Fiji
Fiji
Hindi: फ़िजी), officially the Republic
Republic
of Fiji[11] (Fijian: Matanitu Tugalala o Viti;[12] Fiji
Fiji
Hindi: फ़िजी गणराज्य),[13] is an island country in Melanesia
Melanesia
in the South Pacific Ocean
Pacific Ocean
about 1,100 nautical miles (2,000 km; 1,300 mi) northeast of New Zealand's North Island
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Man (journal)
The Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute
Royal Anthropological Institute
is a quarterly peer-reviewed academic journal published by Wiley-Blackwell on behalf of the Royal Anthropological Institute
Royal Anthropological Institute
of Great Britain and Ireland. The journal covers anthropological topics such as archaeology, civilisation, ritual, mythology, religion, society, and ethnography and includes a book review section.Contents1 History 2 Abstracting and indexing 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] The journal was established in 1901 as Man and obtained its current title in 1995, with volume numbering restarting at 1. For first sixty-three volumes from its inception in 1901 up to 1963 it was issued on a monthly basis, moving to bimonthly issues for the years 1964–1965
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Earth
Earth
Earth
is the third planet from the Sun
Sun
and the only object in the Universe
Universe
known to harbor life. According to radiometric dating and other sources of evidence, Earth
Earth
formed over 4.5 billion years ago.[24][25][26] Earth's gravity interacts with other objects in space, especially the Sun
Sun
and the Moon, Earth's only natural satellite. Earth
Earth
revolves around the Sun
Sun
in 365.26 days, a period known as an Earth
Earth
year
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OCLC
OCLC, currently incorporated as OCLC
OCLC
Online Computer Library Center, Incorporated,[3] is an American nonprofit cooperative organization "dedicated to the public purposes of furthering access to the world's information and reducing information costs".[4] It was founded in 1967 as the Ohio College Library Center. OCLC
OCLC
and its member libraries cooperatively produce and maintain WorldCat, the largest online public access catalog (OPAC) in the world
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Kraków
Kraków
Kraków
(Polish: [ˈkrakuf] ( listen)), also Cracow or Krakow (UK: /ˈkrækaʊ/; US: /ˈkrɑː-/),[2][3] is the second largest and one of the oldest cities in Poland. Situated on the Vistula
Vistula
River (Polish: Wisła) in the Lesser Poland
Poland
(Polish: Małopolska) region, the city dates back to the 7th century.[4] Kraków
Kraków
has traditionally been one of the leading centres of Polish academic, cultural, and artistic life and is one of Poland's most important economic hubs. It was the capital of the Crown of the Kingdom of Poland
Poland
from 1038 to 1569; the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth from 1569 to 1596[5], the Free City of Kraków
Free City of Kraków
from 1815 to 1846; the Grand Duchy of Cracow
Grand Duchy of Cracow
from 1846 to 1918; and Kraków Voivodeship from the 14th century to 1998
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JSTOR
JSTOR
JSTOR
(/ˈdʒeɪstɔːr/ JAY-stor;[3] short for Journal Storage) is a digital library founded in 1995. Originally containing digitized back issues of academic journals, it now also includes books and primary sources, and current issues of journals.[4] It provides full-text searches of almost 2,000 journals.[5] As of 2013, more than 8,000 institutions in more than 160 countries had access to JSTOR;[5] most access is by subscription, but some older public domain content is freely available to anyone.[6] JSTOR's revenue was $69 million in 2014.[7]Contents1 History 2 Content 3 Access3.1 Aaron Swartz
Aaron Swartz
incident 3.2 Limitations 3.3 Increasing public access4 Use 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksHistory[edit] William G
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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Royal Anthropological Institute Of Great Britain And Ireland
The Royal Anthropological Institute
Royal Anthropological Institute
of Great Britain and Ireland (RAI) is a long-established anthropological organisation, with a global membership. Its remit includes all the component fields of anthropology, such as biological anthropology, evolutionary anthropology, social anthropology, cultural anthropology, visual anthropology and medical anthropology, as well as sub-specialisms within these, and interests shared with neighbouring disciplines such as human genetics, archaeology and linguistics. It seeks to combine a tradition of scholarship with services to anthropologists, including students. The RAI promotes the public understanding of anthropology, as well as the contribution anthropology can make to public affairs and social issues
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Arthur Maurice Hocart
Artur, Art (short form), Arturo, Arttu or/and Artturi (Finnish variant) Arthur
Arthur
pronunciationAnglicised pronunciation of Arthur Arthur
Arthur
is a common masculine given name. Its etymology is disputed, but its popularity derives from its being the name of the legendary hero King Arthur. Art and Artie are diminutive forms of the name
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Encyclopædia Britannica
The Encyclopædia Britannica
Encyclopædia Britannica
( Latin
Latin
for "British Encyclopaedia"), published by Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., is a general knowledge English-language
English-language
encyclopaedia. It is written by about 100 full-time editors and more than 4,000 contributors, who have included 110 Nobel Prize
Nobel Prize
winners and five American presidents. The 2010 version of the 15th edition, which spans 32 volumes[1] and 32,640 pages, was the last printed edition; digital content and distribution has continued since then. The Britannica is the oldest English-language
English-language
encyclopaedia still in production. It was first published between 1768 and 1771 in the Scottish capital of Edinburgh, as three volumes
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Lorraine Murray
Lorraine Viscardi Murray (born 1947) is an American author and columnist.Contents1 Life 2 Bibliography 3 References 4 External linksLife[edit] Murray was born in New York City. She received her bachelor's degree in English from the University of Florida in 1968, and her doctorate in Philosophy from the University of Florida in 1982. A radical feminist and atheist for over 20 years, she returned to Catholicism in her forties,[1] a conversion journey she wrote about in her book, Confessions of an Ex-Feminist.[2] Her other books include How Shall We Celebrate?, Why Me? Why Now?: Finding Hope When You Have Breast Cancer, and Grace Notes: Embracing the Joy of Christ in a Broken World. She has also written three mystery novels featuring amateur detective Francesca Bibbo.[3] Her essays on Christian themes appear in the Atlanta Journal Constitution, The Georgia Bulletin, and the National Catholic Register
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Viti Levu
Native Fijians
Fijians
(54.3%), Indo- Fijians
Fijians
(38.1%); other (Asian, Europeans, other Pacific Islander) (7.6%) Viti Levu
Viti Levu
(pronounced [ˈβitʃi ˈleβu]) is the largest island in the Republic of Fiji, the site of the nation's capital, Suva, and home to a large majority of Fiji's population.Contents1 Geography and economy 2 Localities 3 Politics 4 History 5 Other 6 References 7 External linksGeography and economy[edit]Topography of Viti Levu
Viti Levu
island. Viti Levu
Viti Levu
is the largest island in the nation, home to 70% of the population (about 600,000), and is the hub of the entire Fijian archipelago. The island measures 146 kilometres (91 mi) long and 106 kilometres (66 mi) wide, and has an area of 10,389 square kilometres (4,011 sq mi)
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