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Korean Music
The music of Korea
Korea
refers to music from the Korean peninsula ranging from prehistoric times to the division of Korea
Korea
into South and North in 1945
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Victory Over Japan Day
Victory over Japan
Japan
Day (also known as V-J Day, Victory in the Pacific Day, or V-P Day) is the day on which Imperial Japan
Japan
surrendered in World War II, in effect ending the war
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Banchan
Soups & stewsGuk Tang Jeongol Jijimi JjigaeBanchanBokkeum BuchimgaeJeonBugak Gui Hoe Jjim Jokpyeon Jorim Muk Namul Pyeonyuk Po Seon SsamDesserts HangwaDasik Gwapyeon Jeonggwa Kkultarae Suksilgwa Yakbap Yeot Yeotgangjeong YugwaGangjeong HangwaYumilgwaMandugwa Taraegwa YakgwaTteokBaekseolgi Bupyeon Gyeongdan Injeolmi Jeolpyeon Jeungpyeon Mujigae-tteok Siru-tteok SongpyeonBeverages List of Korean beveragesCha Hwachae Sikhye Sul(alcoholic beverages) SujeonggwaCondimentsDoenjang GanjangGukganjang EoganjangGochujang Honey Cheong Mustard sauce OilPerilla oil Sesame oilSsamjang VinegarPersimmon vinegar Rice vinegarUtensilsDolsot Onggi Siru Sujeo TtukbaegiOther
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Korean Folklore
Korean folklore
Korean folklore
has a long history, going back several thousand years. There has been a recent revival of folk tales on internet sites, and as well they provide constant inspiration for artists and illustrators. Recent achievements in keeping Korean folklore
Korean folklore
alive have been the 150 part animated TV series, "Animentary Korean Folklore", telling old tales anew but with traditional 2-D Korean styled animation. See also[edit]Korean culture Korean mythology List of Korea-related topicsThis Korea-related article is a stub
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Korean Cuisine
Soups & stewsGuk Tang Jeongol Jijimi JjigaeBanchanBokkeum BuchimgaeJeonBugak Gui Hoe Jjim Jokpyeon Jorim Muk Namul Pyeonyuk Po Seon SsamDesserts HangwaDasik Gwapyeon Jeonggwa Kkultarae Suksilgwa Yakbap Yeot Yeotgangjeong YugwaGangjeong HangwaYumilgwaMandugwa Taraegwa YakgwaTteokBaekseolgi Bupyeon Gyeongdan Injeolmi Jeolpyeon Jeungpyeon Mujigae-tteok Siru-tteok SongpyeonBeverages List of Korean beveragesCha Hwachae Sikhye Sul(alcoholic beverages) SujeonggwaCondimentsDoenjang GanjangGukganjang EoganjangGochujang Honey Cheong Mustard sauce Oil Perilla
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Gimbap
Gimbap
Gimbap
(김밥) is a Korean dish made from cooked rice and other ingredients that are rolled in gim—dried sheets of laver seaweed—and served in bite-sized slices.[1] The dish is often part of a packed meal, or dosirak, to be eaten at picnics and outdoor events, and can serve as a light lunch along with danmuji (yellow pickled radish) and kimchi. It is a popular take-out food in Korea
Korea
and abroad,[2] and is known as a convenient food because of its portability
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Patbingsu
Patbingsu
Patbingsu
(팥빙수, sometimes anglicized as patbingsoo, literally "red beans shaved ice") is a popular Korean shaved ice dessert with sweet toppings that may include chopped fruit, condensed milk, fruit syrup, and red beans.[1] Varieties with ingredients other than red beans are called bingsu[2] (or bingsoo).[3] The food originally began as ice shavings with red bean paste (known as pat, 팥). Many varieties of patbingsu exist in contemporary culture.Contents1 History 2 Variations 3 Availability 4 Gallery 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The early forms of patbingsu consisted of shaved ice and two or three ingredients, typically red bean paste, tteok, and ground nut powder.[4] The earliest forms of patbingsu existed during the Joseon Dynasty (1392–1910)
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Bibimbap
Bibimbap[2] (/ˈbiːbɪmbæp/ BEE-bim-bap,[3] from Korean bibimbap [pi.bim.p͈ap̚]), sometimes anglicized as bi bim bap or bi bim bop, is a Korean dish. The word literally means "mixed rice". Bibimbap
Bibimbap
is served as a bowl of warm white rice topped with namul (sautéed and seasoned vegetables) and gochujang (chili pepper paste), soy sauce, or doenjang (a fermented soybean paste). A raw or fried egg and sliced meat (usually beef) are common additions. The hot dish is stirred together thoroughly just before eating.[4] In South Korea, Jeonju, Jinju, and Tongyeong
Tongyeong
are especially famous for their versions of bibimbap.[5] In 2011, it was listed at number 40 on the World's 50 most delicious foods readers' poll compiled by CNN Travel.[6]Contents1 History 2 Preparation 3 Variations 4 Symbolism 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The name bibimbap was adopted in the early 20th century
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Seolleongtang
Seolleongtang[1] (설렁탕) or ox bone soup[1] is a Korean broth tang (soup) made from ox bones (mostly leg bones), brisket and other cuts. Seasoning is generally done at the table according to personal taste by adding salt, ground black pepper, red pepper, minced garlic, or chopped spring onions. It is a local dish of Seoul.[2] Seolleongtang
Seolleongtang
is typically simmered over a low flame over a period of several hours to an entire day, to allow the flavor to be gradually extracted from the bones. It has a milky off-white, cloudy appearance and is normally eaten together with rice and several side dishes; the rice is sometimes added directly to the soup.[3] History and etymology[edit] In the Joseon dynasty, Koreans regularly made nationwide sacrifices to their ancestors, such as Dangun
Dangun
(the legendary founder of the kingdom of Gojoseon)
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Kimchi
Kimchi
Kimchi
(/ˈkɪmtʃiː/; Korean: 김치, translit. gimchi, IPA: [kim.tɕʰi]), a staple in Korean cuisine, is a traditional side dish made from salted and fermented vegetables, most commonly napa cabbage and Korean radishes, with a variety of seasonings including chili powder, scallions, garlic, ginger, and jeotgal (salted seafood).[1][2] There are hundreds of varieties of kimchi made with different vegetables as the main ingredients.[3][4] In traditional preparations, kimchi was stored underground in jars to keep cool, and unfrozen during the winter months.[2] With the rise of technology, kimchi refrigerators are
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Korean Fried Chicken
Korean fried chicken
Korean fried chicken
or KFC,[1][2][3] usually called chikin (치킨, from the English "chicken") in Korea, refers to a variety of fried chicken dishes from South Korea, including the basic huraideu-chikin (후라이드 치킨, from the English "fried chicken") and spicy yangnyeom-chikin (양념 치킨, "seasoned chicken").[4] In South Korea, fried chicken is consumed as a meal, an appetizer, anju (food that is served and eaten with drinks), or as an after-meal snack.[5] Korean fried chicken
Korean fried chicken
differs from typical American fried chicken because it is fried twice; the skin is therefore crunchier and less greasy
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Tteok
Soups & stewsGuk Tang Jeongol Jijimi JjigaeBanchanBokkeum BuchimgaeJeonBugak Gui Hoe Jjim Jokpyeon Jorim Muk Namul Pyeonyuk Po Seon SsamDesserts HangwaDasik Gwapyeon Jeonggwa Kkultarae Suksilgwa Yakbap Yeot Yeotgangjeong YugwaGangjeong HangwaYumilgwaMandugwa Taraegwa YakgwaTteokBaekseolgi Bupyeon Gyeongdan Injeolmi Jeolpyeon Jeungpyeon Mujigae-tteok Siru-tteok SongpyeonBeverages List of Korean beveragesCha Hwachae Sikhye Sul(alcoholic beverages) SujeonggwaCondimentsDoenjang GanjangGukganjang EoganjangGochujang Honey Cheong Mustard sauce OilPerilla oil Sesame
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Gochujang
Soups & stewsGuk Tang Jeongol Jijimi JjigaeBanchanBokkeum BuchimgaeJeonBugak Gui Hoe Jjim Jokpyeon Jorim Muk Namul Pyeonyuk Po Seon SsamDesserts HangwaDasik Gwapyeon Jeonggwa Kkultarae Suksilgwa Yakbap Yeot Yeotgangjeong YugwaGangjeong HangwaYumilgwaMandugwa Taraegwa YakgwaTteokBaekseolgi Bupyeon Gyeongdan Injeolmi Jeolpyeon Jeungpyeon Mujigae-tteok Siru-tteok SongpyeonBeverages List of Korean beveragesCha Hwachae Sikhye Sul(alcoholic beverages) SujeonggwaCondimentsDoenjang GanjangGukganjang EoganjangGochujang Honey Cheong Mustard sauce OilPerilla oil Sesame oilSsamjang VinegarPersimmon vinegar Rice vinegarUtensilsDolsot Onggi Siru Sujeo TtukbaegiOther
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List Of Korean Clothing
Hanbok
Hanbok
is a traditional clothing of Korea. This is a list of Korean clothing including the national costume, hanbok as well as headgear, footwear, and accessories.Contents1 Hanbok 2 Headgear 3 Footwear 4 Accessories 5 ReferencesHanbok[edit]Bajibaggy pants (see more pictures at commons:Category:Baji)ChimaChima is a type of skirt worn together with jeogori, short jacket.Dangui Dangui
Dangui
is a female upper garment worn for ceremonial occasions during the Joseon Dynasty.[1] Dangui
Dangui
was also called dang-jeogori (당저고리), dang-jeoksam (당적삼), or dang-hansam (당한삼).[2]DopoDopo is a variety of po (an overcoat) mostly worn by male Confucian scholars called seonbi since the mid Joseon period.DurumagiGarot Garot
Garot
is a type of working and everyday dress dyed with juice of unripe persimmons
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Doenjang
Soups & stewsGuk Tang Jeongol Jijimi JjigaeBanchanBokkeum BuchimgaeJeonBugak Gui Hoe Jjim Jokpyeon Jorim Muk Namul Pyeonyuk Po Seon SsamDesserts HangwaDasik Gwapyeon Jeonggwa Kkultarae Suksilgwa Yakbap Yeot Yeotgangjeong YugwaGangjeong HangwaYumilgwaMandugwa Taraegwa YakgwaTteokBaekseolgi Bupyeon Gyeongdan Injeolmi Jeolpyeon Jeungpyeon Mujigae-tteok Siru-tteok SongpyeonBeverages List of Korean beveragesCha Hwachae Sikhye Sul(alcoholic beverages) SujeonggwaCondimentsDoenjang GanjangGukganjang EoganjangGochujang Honey Cheong Mustard sauce OilPerilla oil Sesame oilSsamjang VinegarPersimmon vinegar Rice
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Anju (food)
Anju (안주; 按酒 [an.dʑu]) is a Korean term for food consumed with alcohol. It consists of a variety of foods, including both main dishes and side dishes. Consuming food with alcohol is a widespread practice in Korea, especially when the alcoholic beverage soju is involved.[1][2] Food consumed with alcohol is called sakana (肴) in Japan. Certain types of foods consumed primarily as Anju include golbaengi muchim, nogari with peanuts, and jokbal.Contents1 History 2 By types of liquor 3 By the place where alcohol is served 4 Sample images 5 See also 6 References 7 Further readingHistory[edit] Until the Chosun Dynasty, alcohol was mainly served in jumaks (a type of inn or tavern), where soups with rice, along with traditional alcohol such as makgeolli, were served to guests
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