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Korea Under Japanese Rule
Korea under Japanese rule
Korea under Japanese rule
began with the end of the short-lived Korean Empire in 1910 and ended at the conclusion of World War II
World War II
in 1945. Japanese rule of Korea was the outcome of a process that began with the Japan–Korea Treaty of 1876, whereby a complex coalition of the Meiji government, military, and business officials sought to integrate Korea both politically and economically into the Empire of Japan. A major stepping-stone towards the Japanese occupation of Korea was the Japan–Korea Treaty of 1905, in which the then- Korean Empire
Korean Empire
was declared a protectorate of Japan. The annexation of Korea by Japan
Japan
was set up in the Japan–Korea Treaty of 1910, which was never actually signed by the Korean Regent, Gojong.[6][7][8] Imperial Japanese rule over Korea ended in 1945, when U.S. and Soviet forces captured the peninsula
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Revised Romanization Of Korean
The Revised Romanization of Korean
Romanization of Korean
(국어의 로마자 표기법; gugeoui romaja pyogibeop. op; lit. "Roman-letter notation of the national language") is the official Korean language romanization system in South Korea
South Korea
proclaimed by the Ministry of Culture and Tourism to replace the older McCune–Reischauer
McCune–Reischauer
system. The new system eliminates diacritics in favor of digraphs and adheres more closely to Korean phonology than to a suggestive rendition of Korean phonetics for non-native speakers. The Revised Romanization limits itself to the ISO basic Latin alphabet, apart from limited, often optional use of the hyphen. It was developed by the National Academy of the Korean Language from 1995 and was released to the public on 7 July 2000 by South Korea's Ministry of Culture and Tourism in Proclamation No
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Terauchi Masatake
Gensui Count
Count
Terauchi Masatake
Terauchi Masatake
(寺内 正毅), GCB (5 February 1852 – 3 November 1919), was a Japanese military officer, proconsul and politician.[1] He was a Gensui (or Marshal) in the Imperial Japanese Army and the 9th Prime Minister of Japan
Prime Minister of Japan
from 9 October 1916 to 29 September 1918.Contents1 Early period 2 Military career 3 Korean Resident-General 4 Political career 5 Legacy 6 Honours 7 Popular culture 8 Notes 9 References 10 External linksEarly period[edit] Terauchi Masatake
Terauchi Masatake
was born in Chōshū Domain
Chōshū Domain
(present-day Yamaguchi Prefecture) as the son of a samurai. As a young soldier, he fought in the Boshin War
Boshin War
against the Tokugawa shogunate, and later was commissioned second lieutenant in the fledging Imperial Japanese Army
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Hangul
Hangul
Hangul
(/ˈhɑːnˌɡuːl/ HAHN-gool;[1] from Korean hangeul 한글 [ha(ː)n.ɡɯl]) is the Korean alphabet. It has been used to write the Korean language
Korean language
since its creation in the 15th century under Sejong the Great.[2][3] It is the official writing system of South Korea
South Korea
and North Korea. It is a co-official writing system in the Yanbian Korean Autonomous Prefecture and Changbai Korean Autonomous County
Changbai Korean Autonomous County
in Jilin
Jilin
Province, China. It is sometimes used to write the Cia-Cia language
Cia-Cia language
spoken near the town of Bau-Bau, Indonesia. The alphabet consists of 19 consonants and 21 vowels. Hangul
Hangul
letters are grouped into syllabic blocks, vertically and horizontally
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Japan–Korea Treaty Of 1905
The Japan–Korea Treaty of 1905, also known as the Eulsa Treaty, Eulsa Unwilling Treaty or Japan–Korea Protectorate Treaty, was made between the Empire of Japan
Empire of Japan
and the Korean Empire
Korean Empire
in 1905. Negotiations were concluded on November 17, 1905.[1] The treaty deprived Korea of its diplomatic sovereignty and made Korea a protectorate of Imperial Japan
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McCune–Reischauer
McCune–Reischauer
McCune–Reischauer
romanization (/məˈkuːn ˈraɪʃaʊ.ər/) is one of the two most widely used Korean language
Korean language
romanization systems. A modified version of McCune–Reischauer
McCune–Reischauer
was the official romanization system in South Korea
South Korea
until 2000, when it was replaced by the Revised Romanization of Korean
Romanization of Korean
system. A variant of McCune–Reischauer
McCune–Reischauer
is still used as the official system in North Korea.[citation needed] The system was created in 1937 by George M. McCune and Edwin O. Reischauer
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Hasegawa Yoshimichi
Count
Count
Hasegawa Yoshimichi
Hasegawa Yoshimichi
(長谷川 好道, 1 October 1850 – 27 January 1924) was a field marshal in the Imperial Japanese Army
Imperial Japanese Army
and Japanese Governor General of Korea
Japanese Governor General of Korea
from 1916 to 1919
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Nobuyuki Abe
General
General
Nobuyuki Abe[1] (阿部 信行, Abe Nobuyuki, November 24, 1875 – 7 September 1953) was a general in the Imperial Japanese Army, Governor- General
General
of Korea, and 36th Prime Minister of Japan
Prime Minister of Japan
from 30 August 1939 to 16 January 1940.Contents1 Early life and military career 2 As Prime Minister 3 Subsequent career 4 Honours 5 References5.1 Books6 External links 7 NotesEarly life and military career[edit] Incorporates information from the corresponding article in the Japanese Abe was born into an ex-samurai family in Kanazawa city, Ishikawa Prefecture. His brother-in-law was Imperial Japanese Navy
Imperial Japanese Navy
admiral Shigeyoshi Inoue. Abe attended Tokyo No.1 Middle School (Tokyo Metropolitan Hibiya High School) followed by No.4 High School
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Emperor Of Japan
The Emperor
Emperor
of Japan
Japan
is the head of the Imperial Family and the traditional head of state of Japan. Under the 1947 constitution, he is defined as "the symbol of the State and of the unity of the people." Historically, he was also the highest authority of the Shinto religion. In Japanese, the Emperor
Emperor
is called Tennō (天皇), which translates to "heavenly sovereign". In English, the use of the term Mikado (帝 or 御門) for the Emperor
Emperor
was once common, but is now considered obsolete.[1] Currently, the Emperor
Emperor
of Japan
Japan
is the only head of state in the world with the English title of "Emperor"
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State Shinto
Shinto
Shinto
(神道, Shintō) or kami-no-michi (among other names)[note 1] is the traditional religion of Japan
Japan
that focuses on ritual practices to be carried out diligently to establish a connec
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Japanese Language
Japanese (日本語, Nihongo, [ɲihoŋɡo] or [ɲihoŋŋo] ( listen)) is an East Asian language spoken by about 126 million people, primarily in Japan, where it is the national language. It is a member of the Japonic (or Japanese-Ryukyuan) language family, and its relation to other languages, such as Korean, is debated. Japanese has been grouped with language families such as Ainu, Austroasiatic, and the now-discredited Altaic, but none of these proposals has gained widespread acceptance. Little is known of the language's prehistory, or when it first appeared in Japan. Chinese documents from the 3rd century recorded a few Japanese words, but substantial texts did not appear until the 8th century. During the Heian period
Heian period
(794–1185), Chinese had considerable influence on the vocabulary and phonology of Old Japanese
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Baekje
Baekje
Baekje
(백제; 百濟; [pɛk̚.t͈ɕe]; 18 BC[1] – 660 AD) was a kingdom located in southwest Korea. It was one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea, together with Goguryeo
Goguryeo
and Silla. Baekje
Baekje
was founded by Onjo, the third son of Goguryeo's founder Jumong and So Seo-no, at Wiryeseong
Wiryeseong
(present-day southern Seoul). Baekje, like Goguryeo, claimed to succeed Buyeo, a state established in present-day Manchuria
Manchuria
around the time of Gojoseon's fall. Baekje
Baekje
alternately battled and allied with Goguryeo
Goguryeo
and Silla
Silla
as the three kingdoms expanded control over the peninsula
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Proto–Three Kingdoms Of Korea
Proto– Three Kingdoms of Korea
Three Kingdoms of Korea
(or Samhan) refers to the proto-historical period in the Korean Peninsula, after the fall of Gojoseon
Gojoseon
and before the maturation of Goguryeo, Baekje, and Silla
Silla
into full-fledged kingdoms
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North–South States Period
North–South States Period
North–South States Period
(698–926 CE) is the period in Korean history when Later Silla
Silla
and Balhae
Balhae
coexisted in the south and north of the peninsula, respectively.[1][2]Contents1 Later Silla 2 Balhae 3 Language 4 See also 5 ReferencesLater Silla[edit] Main article: Later Silla After the unification wars, the Tang Dynasty
Tang Dynasty
established territories in the former Goguryeo, and began to administer and establish communities in Baekje. Silla
Silla
attacked the Chinese in Baekje
Baekje
and northern Korea in 671. The Tang Dynasty
Tang Dynasty
then invaded Silla
Silla
in 674 but Silla
Silla
defeated the Tang army in the north
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Prehistoric Korea
Prehistoric Korea
Prehistoric Korea
is the era of human existence in the Korean Peninsula for which written records do not exist. It nonetheless constitutes the greatest segment of the Korean past and is the major object of study in the disciplines of archaeology, geology, and palaeontology.Contents1 Geological prehistory 2 Periodization 3 Paleolithic 4 Jeulmun
Jeulmun
pottery period 5 Mumun
Mumun
Pottery Period 6 Iron Age 7 Mythological prehistory 8 See also 9 References 10 Further readingGeological prehistory[edit] Geological prehistory is the most ancient part of Korea's past. The oldest rocks in Korea date to the Precambrian. The Yeoncheon System corresponds to the Precambrian
Precambrian
and is distributed around Seoul extending out to Yeoncheon-gun in a northeasterly direction
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Jeulmun Pottery Period
The Jeulmun Pottery
Pottery
Period is an archaeological era in Korean prehistory broadly spanning the period of 8000–1500 BC.[1] This period subsumes the Mesolithic
Mesolithic
and Neolithic
Neolithic
cultural stages in Korea,[2][3] lasting ca. 8000–3500 BC ("Incipient" to "Early" phases) and 3500–1500 BC ("Middle" and "Late" phases), respectively.[4] Because of the early presence of pottery, the entire period has also been subsumed under a broad label of "Korean Neolithic".[5] The Jeulmun pottery
Jeulmun pottery
period is named after the decorated pottery vessels that form a large part of the pottery assemblage consistently over the above period, especially 4000-2000 BC. Jeulmun (Hangul: 즐문, Hanja: 櫛文) means "Comb-patterned"
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