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Komei Tenno
Emperor Kōmei (孝明天皇, Kōmei-tennō, 22 July 1831 – 30 January 1867) was the 121st emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. Kōmei's reign spanned the years from 1846 through 1867, corresponding to the final years of the Edo period. During his reign there was much internal turmoil as a result of Japan's first major contact with the United States, which occurred under Commodore Perry in 1853 and 1854, and the subsequent forced re-opening of Japan to western nations, ending a 220-year period of national seclusion. Emperor Kōmei did not care much for anything foreign, and he opposed opening Japan to Western powers
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Emperor Of Japan
The Emperor of Japan is the head of the Imperial Family and the traditional head of state of Japan. Under the 1947 constitution, he is defined as "the symbol of the State and of the unity of the people." Historically, he was also the highest authority of the Shinto religion. In Japanese, the Emperor is called Tennō (天皇), which translates to "heavenly sovereign". In English, the use of the term Mikado (帝 or 御門) for the Emperor was once common, but is now considered obsolete. Currently, the Emperor of Japan is the only head of state in the world with the English title of "Emperor"
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Ansei
Ansei (安政) was a Japanese era name (年号, nengō, "year name") after Kaei and before Man'en
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Meiji Period
The Meiji period (明治時代, Meiji-jidai), also known as the Meiji era, is a Japanese era which extended from October 23, 1868, to July 30, 1912. This period represents the first half of the Empire of Japan during which Japanese society moved from being an isolated feudal society to its modern form. Fundamental changes affected its social structure, internal politics, economy, military, and foreign relations. The period corresponded to the reign of Emperor Meiji after 1868, and lasted until his death in 1912
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Chrysanthemum Throne
The Chrysanthemum Throne (皇位, kōi, lit. "Imperial seat") is the term used to identify the throne of the Emperor of Japan"> Emperor of Japan
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Imina
Japanese names (日本人の氏名, Nihonjin no Shimei) in modern times usually consist of a family name (surname), followed by a given name. More than one given name is not generally used. Japanese names are usually written in kanji, which are characters usually Chinese in origin but Japanese in pronunciation. The kanji for a name may have a variety of possible Japanese pronunciations, hence parents might use hiragana or katakana when giving a birth name to their newborn child
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Heian Palace
The Heian Palace (平安宮, Heian-kyū) or Daidairi (大内裏) was the original imperial palace of Heian-kyō (present-day Kyoto), the capital of Japan, from 794 to 1227. The palace, which served as the imperial residence and the administrative centre of for most of the Heian period (from 794 to 1185), was located at the north-central location of the city in accordance with the Chinese models used for the design of the capital. The palace consisted of a large rectangular walled enclosure, which contained several ceremonial and administrative buildings including the government ministries. Inside this enclosure was the separately walled residential compound of the emperor or the Inner Palace (Dairi)
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Empress Eisho
Empress Dowager Eishō (英照皇太后, Eishō-kōtaigō, 11 January 1835 – 11 January 1897) was the empress consort of Emperor Kōmei of Japan. She is also known under the technically incorrect name Empress Eishō (英照皇后, Eishō-kōgō).

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Nakayama Yoshiko
Nakayama Yoshiko (中山慶子, 16 January 1836 – 5 October 1907) was a Japanese lady-in-waiting in the court of the Imperial House of Japan
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Black Ships
The Black Ships (in Japanese: 黒船, kurofune, Edo Period"> Edo Period term) was the name given to Western vessels arriving in Japan in the 16th and 19th centuries. In 1543 Portuguese initiated the first contacts, establishing a trade route linking Goa to Nagasaki. The large carracks engaged in this trade had the hull painted black with pitch, and the term came to represent all western vessels. In 1639, after suppressing a rebellion blamed on the Christian influence, the ruling Tokugawa shogunate retreated into an isolationist policy, the Sakoku. During this "locked state", contact with Japan by Westerners was restricted to Dejima island at Nagasaki. In 1844, William II of the Netherlands urged Japan to open, but was rejected. On July 8, 1853, the U.S
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Sengoku Period
The Sengoku period (戦国時代, Sengoku Jidai, "Age of Warring States"; c. 1467 – c. 1603) is a period in Japanese history marked by social upheaval, political intrigue and near-constant military conflict
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Kazu-no-Miya Chikako
Princess Kazu (和宮 親子内親王, Kazu-no-miya Chikako naishinnō, 1 August 1846 – 2 September 1877) (Kazunomiya) was the wife of 14th shōgun Tokugawa Iemochi. She was renamed Lady Seikan'in no miya after she took the tonsure as a widow. She is the great-great aunt of the present emperor, Emperor Akihito. Her birth name was Chikako. She was the eighth and youngest daughter of Emperor Ninkō and his concubine, Hashimoto Tsuneko – renamed Kangyouin (観行院) after she took the tonsure
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Daigaku-no-kami
Daigaku-no kami (大学頭) was a Japanese Imperial court position and the title of the chief education expert in the rigid court hierarchy. The Imperial Daigaku-no kami predates the Heian period; and the court position continued up through the early Meiji period. The title and position were conferred in the name of the Emperor of Japan. In the Edo period, the head of the educational and bureaucrat training system for the Tokugawa shogunate was also known by the honorific title Daigaku-no kami, which effectively translates as "Head of the State University"
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Tokugawa Shogunate
The Tokugawa shogunate, also known as the Tokugawa bakufu (徳川幕府) and the Edo bakufu (江戸幕府), was the last feudal Japanese military government, which existed between 1600 and 1868. The head of government was the
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Hayashi Akira
Hayashi Akira (林 韑, February 10, 1800 – October 12, 1859) (also known as Hayashi Fukusai) was an Edo period scholar-diplomat serving the Tokugawa shogunate in a variety of roles similar to those performed by serial Hayashi clan neo-Confucianists since the time of Tokugawa Ieyasu
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