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Kokh Kox
Kokh Kox
Kokh Kox
(or Koh,[1] as pronounced in Noon) is the creator god of the Noon people.[2][3][4] The Noon are members of the Serer ethnic group of Senegal, the Gambia
Gambia
and Mauritania. Kokh Kox
Kokh Kox
is one of the main deities in Serer religion.[2][3] The Noon people refer to the supreme being as Kokh Kox
Kokh Kox
rather than Roog, the name the majority of Serers refer to the supreme being in the Serer-Sine language. The name Kokh Kox derives from the deity Koox, the name the Saafi people
Saafi people
regularly use to refer to the divine.Contents1 Noon Cosmogony 2 Worship 3 References 4 BibliographyNoon Cosmogony[edit] Main article: Serer creation myth See also: Cosmogony
Cosmogony
of the Ndut The Noon cosmogony follows a similar narrative to the Ndut especially in regards to how death began on Earth
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Dog
Canis
Canis
familiaris Linnaeus, 1758[2][3]Montage showing the morphological variation of the dog.The domestic dog ( Canis
Canis
lupus familiaris or Canis
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Noon Language
Noon (Non, None, Serer-Noon, Serer-Non) is a Cangin language
Cangin language
of Senegal
Senegal
spoken in the Thiès
Thiès
region (14°47'0"N / 16°55'0"W). There is an estimated population of 10,000[2]- 50,000[3] speakers worldwide, rendering this language to be vulnerable[4].Ethnologue reports that it is 84% cognate (and 52% intelligible) with Lehar, essentially a divergent dialect, and 68% cognate with the other Cangin languages. The Noon people identify themselves ethnically as Serer. However, their language, often called Serer-Noon
Serer-Noon
on the assumption that it is a Serer dialect, is not closely related to the principal language of the Serer population, Serer-Sine.Contents1 Status 2 Orthography2.1 Consonants 2.2 Vowels 2.3 Capitalization Rules2.3.1 Rule 1
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Creator God
A creator deity or creator god (often called the Creator) is a deity or god responsible for the creation of the Earth, world, and universe in human mythology. In monotheism, the single God
God
is often also the creator
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Tassili N'Ajjer
Tassili n'Ajjer
Tassili n'Ajjer
(Berber languages: Tasili n Ajjer, Arabic: طاسيلي ناجر‎; "Plateau of the Rivers") is a national park in the Sahara
Sahara
desert, located on a vast plateau in
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Gambia
The Gambia
The Gambia
(/ˈɡæmbiə/ ( listen)), officially the Republic
Republic
of The Gambia,[5][6] is a country in West Africa
West Africa
that is entirely surrounded by Senegal
Senegal
except for its coastline on the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
at its western end. It is the smallest country on mainland Africa.[7] The Gambia
The Gambia
is situated on either side of the Gambia River, the nation's namesake, which flows through the centre of The Gambia
The Gambia
and empties into the Atlantic Ocean. Its area is 10,689 square kilometres (4,127 sq mi) with a population of 1,857,181 as of the April 2013 census
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Mauritania
Coordinates: 20°N 12°W / 20°N 12°W / 20; -12 Islamic Republic
Islamic Republic
of Mauritania الجمهورية الإسلامية الموريتانية (Arabic) al-Jumhūrīyah al-Islāmīyah al-Mūrītānīyah République islamique de Mauritanie  (French)FlagSealMotto: شرف إخاء عدل (Arabic) "Honor, Fraternity, Justice"Anthem: نشيد وطني موريتاني (English: "National anthem of Mauritania")Location of
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Cosmogony
Cosmogony
Cosmogony
(or cosmogeny) is any model concerning the origin of either the cosmos or universe.[1][2] Developing a complete theoretical model has implications in both the philosophy of science and epistemology.Contents1 Etymology 2 Overview 3 Compared with cosmology 4 Theoretical scenarios 5 See also 6 ReferencesEtymology[edit] The word comes from the Koine Greek
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Cekeen Tumulus
The tumuli of Cekeen are located in the Diourbel Department
Diourbel Department
of the Diourbel
Diourbel
Region. The Diourbel Region
Diourbel Region
and the city of Diourbel
Diourbel
were part of the precolonial Kingdom of Baol, now part of present-day Senegal.Contents1 Purpose 2 World Heritage
World Heritage
Status 3 See also 4 ReferencesPurpose[edit] In this area, a tumulus was used as a burial mound for chiefs. A deceased chief would be joined by other members of his court along with important objects such as furniture and other implements.[1] In this case, he and his escort would be situated in the chief's hut, whereupon the hut was buried with soil and rocks
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Sacred Grove
A sacred grove or sacred woods are any grove of trees that are of special religious importance to a particular culture. Sacred groves feature in various cultures throughout the world. They were important features of the mythological landscape and cult practice of Celtic, Baltic, Germanic, ancient Greek, Near Eastern, Roman, and Slavic polytheism, and were also used in India, Japan, and West Africa. Examples of sacred groves include the Greco-Roman temenos, the Norse hörgr, and the Celtic nemeton, which was largely but not exclusively associated with Druidic practice. During the Northern Crusades, there was a common practice of building churches on the sites of sacred groves
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Animism
Animism
Animism
(from Latin
Latin
anima, "breath, spirit, life")[1][2] is the religious belief that objects, places and creatures all possess a distinct spiritual essence.[3][4][5][6] Potentially, animism perceives all things—animals, plants, rocks, rivers, weather systems, human handiwork and perhaps even words—as animated and alive. Animism
Animism
is used in the anthropology of religion as a term for the belief system of many indigenous peoples,[7] especially in contrast to the relatively more recent development of organised religions.[8] Although each culture has its own different mythologies and rituals, "animism" is said to describe the most common, foundational thread of indigenous peoples' "spiritual" or "supernatural" perspectives
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Marguerite Dupire
Marguerite Dupire (12 October 1920 – 4 March 2015) was a French ethnologist who specialises on African people, and had worked extensively on the Fulani of Niger, Cameroon, Guinea, Senegal, and then after a mission in Ivory Coast, on the Serer people of Sine (in Senegal) since 1965.[1][2][3]Contents1 Biography 2 Publications 3 External links 4 NotesBiography[edit] Dupire gained a degree in philosophy in 1943. She then completed her training by studying psychology and ethnology at the University of Paris, then in the United States, at the Northwestern University and the Philadelphia University, where she was the student of notable anthropologists such as Melville Herskovits and Alfred Irving Hallowell in the late 1940s.[1][2] Publications[edit] Marguerite Dupire has authored numerous scientific articles (see below).[1][2] Her principal works are :Peuls nomades : étude descriptive des Wodaabe du Sahel nigérien, Karthala, Paris, 1996 (1ère éd
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Serer Prehistory
The prehistoric and ancient history of the Serer people
Serer people
of modern-day Senegambia
Senegambia
has been extensively studied and documented over the years. Much of it comes from arc
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Serer Language
Serer, often broken into differing regional dialects such as Serer-Sine and Serer saloum, is a language of the Senegambian branch of Niger–Congo spoken by 1.2 million people in Senegal
Senegal
and 30,000 in the Gambia.[3] It is the principal language of the Serer people.Contents1 Classification 2 Phonology2.1 Consonants3 Serer greetings 4 See also 5 Notes 6 BibliographyClassification[edit] Serer is one of the Senegambian languages, which are characterized by consonant mutation. The traditional classification of Atlantic is that of Sapir (1971), which found that Serer was closest to Fulani.[4] However, a widely cited misreading of the data by Wilson (1989) inadvertently exchanged Serer for Wolof. Dialects of Serer are Serer Sine (the prestige dialect), Segum, Fadyut-Palmerin, Dyegueme (Gyegem), and Niominka
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