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Knoxville Riot Of 1919
The Knoxville riot of 1919 was a race riot that took place in Knoxville, Tennessee, United States, on August 30–31, 1919. The riot began when a lynch mob stormed the county jail in search of Maurice Mays, a mulatto man who had been accused of murdering a white woman. Unable to find Mays, the rioters looted the jail and fought a pitched gun battle with the residents of a predominantly black neighborhood. The Tennessee National Guard, which at one point fired two machine guns indiscriminately into this neighborhood, eventually dispersed the rioters.[1] Newspapers placed the death toll at just two, though eyewitness accounts suggest it was much higher.[1] The Riot of 1919 was one of several violent racial incidents that occurred during the so-called Red Summer, when race riots plagued cities across the United States
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Knoxville, Tennessee
Knoxville
Knoxville
is a city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Tennessee, and the county seat of Knox County.[13] The city had an estimated population of 186,239 in 2016[7] and a population of 178,874 as of the 2010 census, making it the state's third largest city after Nashville and Memphis.[14] Knoxville
Knoxville
is the principal city of the Knoxville Metropolitan Statistical Area, which, in 2016, was 868,546, up 0.9 percent, or 7,377 people, from to 2015.[15] The KMSA is, in turn, the central component of the Knoxville-Sevierville-La Follette Combined Statistical Area, which, in 2013, had a population of 1,096,961. First settled in 1786, Knoxville
Knoxville
was the first capital of Tennessee. The city struggled with geographic isolation throughout the early 19th century
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Spanish–American War
American victoryTreaty of Paris of 1898Territorial changes Spain
Spain
relinquishes sovereignty over Cuba, cedes Puerto Rico, Guam
Guam
and the Philippine Islands
Philippine Islands
to the United States
United States
for $20 millionBelligerents United States Cuban revolutionaries[a] Filipino revolutionaries[a] Spain Cuba Spanish East Indies Puerto RicoCommanders and leaders William McKinley Nelson A. Miles Theodore Roosevelt William R. Shafter George Dewey William Sampson Wesley Merritt Joseph Wheeler Charles D
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Sheriff
A sheriff is a government official, with varying duties, existing in some countries with historical ties to England, where the office originated. There is an analogous although independently developed office in Iceland
Iceland
that is commonly translated to English as sheriff, and this is discussed below.Contents1 Description 2 Term 3 Modern usage3.1 Australia 3.2 Canada3.2.1 Alberta 3.2.2 British Columbia 3.2.3 Nova Scotia3.3 Iceland 3.4 India 3.5 Republic of Ireland 3.6 Scotland3.6.1 Sheriffs principal 3.6.2 Sheriffs 3.6.3 Summary sheriffs3.7 South Africa 3.8 United States4 References 5 External linksDescription[edit] Historically, a sheriff was a legal official with responsibility for a "shire" or county
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Chattanooga
Chattanooga is a city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Tennessee, with a population of 177,571 in 2016.[4] The fourth-largest Tennessee
Tennessee
city, it is the seat of Hamilton County. Located in southeastern Tennessee, on the Tennessee
Tennessee
River, served by multiple railroads and Interstate highways, Chattanooga is a transit hub
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Dynamite
Dynamite
Dynamite
is an explosive made of nitroglycerin, sorbents (such as powdered shells or clay) and stabilizers. It was invented by the Swedish chemist and engineer Alfred Nobel
Alfred Nobel
in Geesthacht, and patented in 1867. It rapidly gained wide-scale use as a safer alternative to black powder. Today dynamite is mainly used in the mining, quarrying, construction, and demolition industries. Dynamite
Dynamite
is still the product of choice for trenching applications, and as a cost-effective alternative to cast boosters
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Looting
Looting, also referred to as sacking, ransacking, plundering, despoiling, despoliation, and pillaging, is the indiscriminate taking of goods by force as part of a military or political victory, or during a catastrophe, such as war,[1] natural disaster,[2] or rioting.[3] The term is also used in a broader sense to describe egregious instances of theft and embezzlement, such as the "plundering" of private or public assets by governments.[4] The proceeds of all these activities can be described as booty, loot, plunder, spoils, or pillage.[5][6]Looters attempting to enter a cycle shop in North London during the 2011 England riotsContents1 Looting
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Gay Street (Knoxville)
Gay Street is a street in Knoxville, Tennessee, United States, that traverses the heart of the city's downtown area
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Browning Machine Gun
Browning machine guns are a family of machine gun designs by John Browning, a prolific weapon designer. These include:M1895 Colt–Browning machine gun, based on a design dating to 1889, was the first successful gas-operated machine gun to enter service.[1] M1917 Browning machine gun, a family of water-cooled machine guns in .30-'06 M1919 Browning machine gun, a family of air-cooled machine guns in .30-'06 M1921 Browning machine gun, a family of water-cooled machine guns in .50 BMG M2 Browning machine gun, a family of air-cooled machine guns in .50 BMG M1918 Browning Automatic Rifle, or its variantsA related term:.50 BMG or .50 Browning Machine Gun, a large caliber machine gun roundReferences[edit]^ http://world.guns.ru/machine/usa/colt-browning-m195-e.htmlThis article includes a list of related items that share the same name (or similar names). If an internal link incorrectly led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to t
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Sniper
A sniper is a military/paramilitary marksman who operates to maintain effective visual contact with the enemy and engage targets from concealed positions or at distances exceeding their detection capabilities.[1] Snipers generally have specialized training and are equipped with high-precision rifles and high-magnification optics, and often feed information back to their units or command headquarters. In addition to marksmanship and long range shooting, military snipers are trained in a variety of tactical techniques: detection, stalking, and target range estimation methods, camouflage, field craft, infiltration, special reconnaissance and observation, surveillance and target acquisition.Contents1 Etymology 2 Modern warfare2.1 Military
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Tennessee River
The Tennessee
Tennessee
River is the largest tributary of the Ohio River.[5] It is approximately 652 miles (1,049 km) long and is located in the southeastern United States
United States
in the Tennessee
Tennessee
Valley
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Market Square, Knoxville
Market Square is a pedestrian mall located in Knoxville, Tennessee, United States. Established in 1854 as a market place for regional farmers, the square has developed over the decades into a multipurpose venue that accommodates events ranging from concerts to political rallies, and has long provided a popular gathering place for artists, street musicians, war veterans, and activists. Along with the Market House, Market Square was home to Knoxville's City Hall from 1868 to 1924. Market Square was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984.[2] Land for the market place was given to the city by William G. Swan and Joseph A
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John Chiles Houk
Attorneypolitician John Chiles Houk (February 26, 1860 – June 3, 1923) was an American politician and a member of the United States House of Representatives for the 2nd congressional district of Tennessee.Contents1 Biography 2 Career 3 Death 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Houk was born in Clinton, Tennessee in Anderson County on February 26, 1860, son of Leonidas C. Houk and Elizabeth Houk.[1] He attended the local schools, and moved with his parents to Knoxville in 1871. He graduated from the University of Tennessee at Knoxville.Career[edit] Employed as a clerk in the Pensions Bureau at Washington, D.C., Houk worked from 1881 to 1883. He studied law at Columbian (now George Washington) University in Washington, D.C
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William F. Yardley
William Francis Yardley (January 8, 1844 – May 20, 1924) was an American attorney, politician and civil rights advocate, operating primarily out of Knoxville, Tennessee, in the late 19th century. He was Tennessee's first African-American gubernatorial candidate, and is believed to have been the first African-American attorney to argue a case before the Tennessee Supreme Court.[3] He published a newspaper, the Examiner, that promoted African-American rights, and was an advocate for labor and the poor both as an attorney and as a politician.[3]Contents1 Biography 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Yardley was born in 1844 to an Irish mother and a black father, making him free by birth.[4] His mother left him on the doorstep of the Yardley family, a white family who gave him his name and raised him.[3] During the 1850s, he attended a school for colored children taught by St
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Electric Chair
Execution by electrocution, performed using an electric chair, is a method of execution originating in the United States
United States
in which the condemned person is strapped to a specially built wooden chair and electrocuted through electrodes fastened on the head and leg. This execution method, conceived in 1881 by a Buffalo, New York, dentist named Alfred P. Southwick, was developed throughout the 1880s as a "humane alternative" to hanging, and first used in 1890. This execution method has been used in the United States
United States
and, for a period of several decades,[1] in the Philippines
Philippines
(its first use was in 1924, last in 1976). Historically, once the condemned person was attached to the chair, various cycles (differing in voltage and duration) of alternating current would be passed through the individual's body, in order to cause fatal damage to the internal organs (including the brain)
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Tennessee State Prison
Tennessee State Prison is a former correctional facility located near downtown Nashville, Tennessee. Opened in 1898, the prison has been closed since 1992.[1] It has been the location for the films Nashville, Marie, Ernest Goes to Jail, Against the Wall, The Green Mile, The Last Castle,[2] two of Eric Church's music videos "Lightning" and "Homeboy", and Pillar's "Bring Me Down" music video. Most recently VH1's Celebrity Paranormal Project filmed there for the third episode of the series (titled "The Warden") as well as the last episode of the first season (titled "Dead Man Walking")
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