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Kleenex
Kleenex
Kleenex
is a brand name for a variety of paper-based products such as facial tissue, bathroom tissue, paper towels, tampons, and diapers. Often used informally as a genericized trademark for facial tissue in the United States, the name Kleenex
Kleenex
is a registered trademark of Kimberly-Clark
Kimberly-Clark
Worldwide, Inc. Kleenex
Kleenex
products are manufactured in 30 countries and sold in more than 170 countries
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Business Card
Business cards are cards bearing business information about a company or individual. They are shared during formal introductions as a convenience and a memory aid. A business card typically includes the giver's name, company or business affiliation (usually with a logo) and contact information such as street addresses, telephone number(s), fax number, e-mail addresses and website. Before the advent of electronic communication business cards might also include telex details. Now they may include social media addresses such as Facebook, LinkedIn
LinkedIn
and Twitter
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Toilet Paper
Toilet
Toilet
paper is a tissue paper product people primarily use to clean the anus and surrounding area of fecal material after defecation and used for cleaning the perineal area of urine after urination and other bodily fluid releases. It also acts as a layer of protection for the hands during these processes. It is sold as a long strip of perforated paper wrapped around a paperboard core for storage in a dispenser near a toilet. Most modern toilet paper in the developed world is designed to decompose in septic tanks, whereas some other bathroom and facial tissues are not
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Coffee Cup Sleeve
Coffee
Coffee
cup sleeves, also known as coffee sleeves, coffee clutches, coffee cozies, hot cup jackets, paper zarfs, coffee collars, coffee sleeve, and cup holders, are roughly cylindrical sleeves that fit tightly over handle-less paper coffee cups to insulate the drinker's hands from hot coffee. Coffee
Coffee
sleeves are typically made of textured paperboard, but can be found made of other materials. Coffee
Coffee
sleeves allow coffee houses, fast food restaurants, and other vendors to avoid double-cupping, the practice of using two (or more) nested paper cups for a single hot beverage. Some paper cup holders carry advertisements. The coffee sleeve was invented in 1991 by Jay Sorensen[1] and patented in 1995[2] (under the trademarked name Java Jacket), and are now commonly utilized by coffee houses and other vendors that sell hot beverages dispensed in disposable paper cups
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Corrugated Fiberboard
Corrugated fiberboard
Corrugated fiberboard
is a material consisting of a fluted corrugated sheet and one or two flat linerboards. It is made on "flute lamination machines" or "corrugators" and is used in the manufacture of shipping containers and corrugated boxes. The corrugated medium and linerboard board both are made of kraft containerboard, a paperboard material usually over 0.01 inches (0.25 mm) thick
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Envelope
An envelope is a common packaging item, usually made of thin flat material. It is designed to contain a flat object, such as a letter or card. Traditional envelopes are made from sheets of paper cut to one of three shapes: a rhombus, a short-arm cross or a kite. These shapes allow for the creation of the envelope structure by folding the sheet sides around a central rectangular area
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Molded Pulp
Molded pulp, also named moulded pulp or molded fibre, is a packaging material, typically made from recycled paperboard and/or newsprint. It is used for protective packaging or for food service trays and beverage carriers
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Oyster Pail
An oyster pail (also known as a Chinese food
Chinese food
box or Chinese takeout container) is a folded, waxed or plastic coated, paperboard container originally designed to hold oysters. It commonly comes with a handle made of solid wire. Currently, it is often in use by American Chinese cuisine restaurants primarily throughout the United States, to package hot or cold take-out food. It can also sometimes be found in other western countries such as Australia, New Zealand, Germany and England, but is rarely seen in China and other Asian countries with high numbers of ethnic Chinese.Contents1 Uses 2 History 3 See also 4 NotesUses[edit] The container has the advantage of being inexpensive, durable and fairly leak-proof as long as it is kept upright. The top usually includes a locking paperboard tab so that it is self-closing. The simple origami-like folded construction also allows for some escape of steam from hot food
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Paper Bag
A paper bag is a bag made of paper, usually kraft paper. Paper
Paper
bags are commonly used as shopping bags, packaging, and sacks.Contents1 History 2 Production 3 Single layer 4 Multiwall paper sacks 5 Recycling 6 See also 7 References7.1 BooksHistory[edit] In 1852, Francis Wolle, a schoolteacher, invented the first machine to mass-produce paper bags.[1] Wolle and his brother patented the machine and founded the Union Paper
Paper
Bag
Bag
Company. In 1871, inventor Margaret E. Knight designed a machine that could create flat-bottomed paper bags, which could carry more than the previous envelope-style design.[citation needed] In 1883, Charles Stilwell patented a machine that made square-bottom paper bags with pleated sides, making them easier to fold and store.[2] This style of bag came to be known as the S.O.S., or "Self-Opening Sack".[3] In 1912, Walter Deubener, a grocer in St
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Paperboard
Paperboard
Paperboard
is a thick paper-based material. While there is no rigid differentiation between paper and paperboard, paperboard is generally thicker (usually over 0.30 mm, 0.012 in, or 12 points) than paper and has certain superior attributes such as foldability and rigidity. According to ISO standards, paperboard is a paper with a grammage above 250 g/m2, but there are exceptions.[1] Paperboard
Paperboard
can be single- or multi-ply. Paperboard
Paperboard
can be easily cut and formed, is lightweight, and because it is strong, is used in packaging
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Paper Cup
A paper cup is a disposable cup made out of paper and often lined or coated with plastic or wax to prevent liquid from leaking out or soaking through the paper.[1][2][3] It may be made of recycled paper[4] and is widely used around the world.Contents1 History1.1 Dixie cups2 Manufacture2.1 Waterproofing 2.2 Printing on paper cups3 Environmental impact3.1 Recycling 3.2 Paper
Paper
vs plastic 3.3 Emissions 3.4 Habitat-loss trees used4 Lids 5 See also 6 References6.1 Citations 6.2 BibliographyHistory[edit]
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Napkin
A napkin, serviette or face towelette is a rectangle of cloth used at the table for wiping the mouth and fingers while eating. It is usually small and folded, sometimes in intricate designs and shapes. The word comes from Middle English, borrowing the French nappe—a cloth covering for a table—and adding -kin, the diminutive suffix.Contents1 Terminology 2 Description and history 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksTerminology[edit] "Serviette" can be heard in the United Kingdom, Ireland, some parts of Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Kenya and South Africa. In Australia and New Zealand, "serviette" generally refers to the paper variety and "napkin" refers to the cloth variety
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Paper Towel
A kitchen roll (or kitchen paper) is an absorbent towel made from tissue paper instead of cloth. Unlike cloth towels, paper towels are disposable and intended to be used only once. Paper
Paper
towels soak up water because they are loosely woven which enables water to travel between the fibers, even against gravity (capillary effect). Paper towels can be individually packed (as stacks of folded towels or held coiled) or come in rolls
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Wet Wipe
A wet wipe, also known as a wet towel or a moist towelette, or a baby wipe in specific circumstances, is a small moistened piece of paper or cloth that often comes folded and individually wrapped for convenience. Wet wipes are used for cleaning purposes like personal hygiene and household cleaning. Water companies discourage the flushing of wet wipes down toilets, as their failure to break down can contribute to sewer blockages known as fatbergs.[1] Even wipes marketed as being "flushable" can cause blockages.[2]Contents1 Invention 2 Production 3 Uses3.1 Baby wipes 3.2 Personal hygiene 3.3 Cleansing pads 3.4 Industrial wipes 3.5 Pain relief 3.6 Pet care 3.7 Healthcare4 Effect on sewage systems 5 See also 6 ReferencesInvention[edit] American Arthur Julius is seen as the inventor of the wet wipes.[3] Julius worked in the cosmetics industry and in 1957, adjusted a soap portionor machine, putting it in a loft in Manhattan
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Corrugated Box Design
Corrugated box design
Corrugated box design
is the process of matching design factors for corrugated fiberboard boxes with the functional physical, processing and end-use requirements. Packaging engineers work to meet the performance requirements of a box while controlling total costs throughout the system. In addition to the structural design discussed in this article, printed bar codes, labels, and graphic design are also vital.Contents1 Functions1.1 Stacking strength 1.2 Estimating compression2 Process 3 Design 4 Individual mixed shipments 5 Government, military, and export5.1 Export6 Dangerous and hazardous goods 7 Box
Box
closure 8 References8.1 Books, general references 8.2 ASTM
ASTM
standardsFunctions[edit]Microflute box with circular security tape sealPartially open; showing tuck flap and locking tab (tongue)Corrugated boxes are used frequently as shipping containers
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Stationery
Stationery
Stationery
is a mass noun referring to commercially manufactured writing materials, including cut paper, envelopes, writing implements, continuous form paper, and other office supplies.[1] Stationery includes materials to be written on by hand (e.g., letter paper) or by equipment such as computer printers.Contents1 History of stationery 2 Uses of stationery2.1 Printing2.1.1 Letterpress 2.1.2 Single documents 2.1.3 Thermographic2.2 Embossing 2.3 Engraving3 Classifications 4 School supplies 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory of stationery[edit] Originally the term stationery referred to all products sold by a stationer, whose name indicated that his book shop was on a fixed spot, usually near a university, and permanent, while medieval trading was mainly carried on by itinerant peddlers (including chapmen, who sold books) and others (such as farmers and craftsmen) at markets and fairs
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