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Kit Fox
The kit fox ( Vulpes
Vulpes
macrotis) is a fox species of North America. Its range is primarily in the Southwestern United States
Southwestern United States
and northern and central Mexico. Some mammalogists classify it as conspecific with the swift fox, V. velox, but molecular systematics imply that the two species are distinct.[3]Contents1 Range 2 Subspecies 3 Appearance 4 Diet 5 Habitat 6 Mating 7 References 8 External linksRange[edit] The northernmost part of its range is the arid interior of Oregon. Its eastern limit is southwestern Colorado
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Kit (other)
Kit
Kit
may refer to:Contents1 Places 2 People 3 Animals 4 Arts, entertainment, and media 5 Kinds of sets 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPlaces[edit]Kitt, Indiana, United States, formerly spelled Kit, an unincorporated community Kit, Iran, a village in Mazandaran Province Kit
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Carnivore
A carnivore /ˈkɑːrnɪvɔːr/, meaning "meat eater" (Latin, caro, genitive carnis, meaning "meat" or "flesh" and vorare meaning "to devour"), is an organism that derives its energy and nutrient requirements from a diet consisting mainly or exclusively of animal tissue, whether through predation or scavenging.[1][2] Animals that depend solely on animal flesh for their nutrient requirements are called obligate carnivores while those that also consume non-animal food are called facultative carnivores.[2] Omnivores also consume both animal and non-animal food, and, apart from the more general definition, there is no clearly defined ratio of plant to animal material that would distinguish a facultative carnivore from an omnivore.[3] A carnivore at the top of the food chain, not preyed upon by other animals, is termed an apex predator. "Carnivore" also may refer to the mammalian order Carnivora, but this is somewhat misleading: many, but not all,
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Mojave Desert
The Mojave Desert
Desert
( /moʊˈhɑːvi, mə-/,[5][6][7] mo-HAH-vee or mə-HAH-vee) is an arid rain-shadow desert and the driest desert in North America.[8] It is located in the southwestern United States, primarily within southeastern California
California
and southern Nevada, and it occupies a total of 47,877 sq mi (124,000 km2). Very small areas also extend into Utah
Utah
and Arizona.[9] Its boundaries are generally noted by the presence of Joshua trees, which are native only to the Mojave Desert
Desert
and are considered an indicator species, and it is believed to support an additional 1,750 to 2,000 species of plants.[10] The central part of the desert is sparsely populated, while its peripheries support large communities such as Las Vegas, San Bernardino, Lancaster, Palmdale, Victorville, and St
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Nocturnality
Nocturnality
Nocturnality
is an animal behavior characterized by being active during the night and sleeping during the day. The common adjective is "nocturnal", versus diurnal meaning the opposite. Nocturnal creatures generally have highly developed senses of hearing, smell, and specially adapted eyesight. Such traits can help animals such as the Helicoverpa zea
Helicoverpa zea
moths avoid predators.[1] Some animals, such as cats and ferrets, have eyes that can adapt to both low-level and bright day levels of illumination (see metaturnal). Others, such as bushbabies and (some) bats, can function only at night. Many nocturnal creatures including tarsiers and some owls have large eyes in comparison with their body size to compensate for the lower light levels at night
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Kangaroo Rat
Dipodomys agilis Dipodomys californicus Dipodomys compactus Dipodomys deserti Dipodomys elator Dipodomys elephantinus Dipodomys gravipes Dipodomys heermanni Dipodomys ingens Dipodomys merriami Dipodomys microps Dipodomys nelsoni Dipodomys nitratoides Dipodomys ordii Dipodomys panamintinus Dipodomys phillipsii Dipodomys simulans Dipodomys spectabilis Dipodomys stephensi Dipodomys venustus Kangaroo
Kangaroo
rats, small rodents of genus Dipodomys, are native to western North America. The common name derives from their bipedal form. They hop in a manner similar to the much larger kangaroo, but developed this mode of locomotion independently, like several other clades of rodents (e.g
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Cottontail Rabbit
16 sp., see textCottontail rabbits are among the 20 lagomorph species in the genus Sylvilagus, found in the Americas.[1] Most cottontail rabbits closely resemble the wild European rabbit ( Oryctolagus
Oryctolagus
cuniculus). Most Sylvilagus species have stub tails with white undersides that show when they retreat, giving them their name: "cottontails". This feature is not present in some cottontails (for example, the underside of the brush rabbit's tail is gray), nor is it unique to the genus (for example, the European rabbit
European rabbit
also has a white scut). The genus is widely distributed across North America, Central America, and northern and central South America, though most species are confined to particular regions
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Black-tailed Jackrabbit
The black-tailed jackrabbit (Lepus californicus), also known as the American desert hare, is a common hare of the western United States and Mexico, where it is found at elevations from sea level up to 10,000 ft (3,000 m). Reaching a length around 2 ft (61 cm), and a weight from 3 to 6 lb (1.4 to 2.7 kg), the black-tailed jackrabbit is the third-largest North American hare. Black-tailed jackrabbits occupy mixed shrub-grassland terrains. Their breeding depends on the location; it typically peaks in spring, but may continue all year round in warm climates. Young are born fully furred with eyes open; they are well camouflaged and are mobile within minutes of birth, thus females do not protect or even stay with the young except during nursing
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Hare
See textHares and jackrabbits are leporids belonging to the genus Lepus. Hares are classified into the same family as rabbits. They are similar in size and form to rabbits and eat the same diet. They are generally herbivorous and long-eared, they are fast runners, and they typically live solitarily or in pairs. Hare
Hare
species are native to Africa, Eurasia, North America, and the Japanese archipelago. Five leporid species with "hare" in their common names are not considered true hares: the hispid hare (Caprolagus hispidus), and four species known as red rock hares (comprising Pronolagus). Meanwhile, jackrabbits are hares rather than rabbits. A hare less than one year old is called a leveret
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Prairie Dog
Cynomys gunnisoni Cynomys leucurus Cynomys ludovicianus Cynomys mexicanus Cynomys parvidensPrairie dogs (genus Cynomys) are herbivorous burrowing rodents native to the grasslands of North America. The five species are: black-tailed, white-tailed, Gunnison's, Utah, and Mexican prairie dogs. They are a type of ground squirrel, found in the United States, Canada
Canada
and Mexico. In Mexico, prairie dogs are found primarily in the northern states, which lie at the southern end of the Great Plains: northeastern Sonora, north and northeastern Chihuahua, northern Coahuila, northern Nuevo León, and northern Tamaulipas
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Scavenge
Scavenging
Scavenging
is both a carnivorous and a herbivorous feeding behavior in which the scavenger feeds on dead animal and plant material present in its habitat.[1] The eating of carrion from the same species is referred to as cannibalism. Scavengers play an important role in the ecosystem by consuming the dead animal and plant material
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Carrion
Carrion
Carrion
(from Latin
Latin
caro, meaning "meat") is the decaying flesh of a dead animal. Overview[edit] Carrion
Carrion
is an important food source for large carnivores and omnivores in most ecosystems. Examples of carrion-eaters (or scavengers) include vultures, hawks, eagles,[1] hyenas,[2] Virginia opossum,[3] Tasmanian devils,[4] coyotes,[5] and Komodo dragons.[6] Many invertebrates such as the carrion and burying beetles,[7] as well as maggots of calliphorid flies and flesh-flies also eat carrion, playing an important role in recycling nitrogen and carbon in animal remains.Play mediaZoarcid fish feeding on the carrion of a mobulid ray. Carrion
Carrion
begins to decay the moment of the animal's death, and it will increasingly attract insects and breed bacteria
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Tomato
Lycopersicon lycopersicum (L.) H. Karst. Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.[1]The tomato (see pronunciation) is the edible, often red, vegetable of the plant Solanum
Solanum
lycopersicum,[2] commonly known as a tomato plant. The plant belongs to the nightshade family, Solanaceae.[1] The species originated in western South America.[2][3] The Nahuatl
Nahuatl
(Aztec language) word tomatl gave rise to the Spanish word "tomate", from which the English word tomato derived.[3][4] Its use as a cultivated food may have originated with the indigenous peoples of México.[2][5] The Spanish discovered the tomato from their contact with the Aztec peoples during the Spanish colonization of the Americas, then brought it to Europe, and, from there, to other parts of the European colonized world during the 16th century.[2] Tomato
Tomato
is consumed in diverse ways, including raw, as an ingredient in many dishes, sauces, salads, and drinks
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Southern California
Southern California
California
(colloquially known as SoCal) is a geographic and cultural region that generally comprises California's 10 southernmost counties.[1][2] The region is traditionally described as eight counties, based on demographics and economic ties: Imperial, Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego, Santa Barbara, and Ventura.[3] The more extensive 10-county definition, which includes Kern and San Luis Obispo counties, is also used and is based on historical political divisions.[1] The 8-county and 10-county definitions are not used for the greater Southern California
California
Megaregion, one of the 11 megaregions of the United States
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Desert Scrub
This article needs attention from an expert in Deserts. Please add a reason or a talk parameter to this template to explain the issue with the article. WikiProject Deserts may be able to help recruit an expert. (June 2014)Extent of deserts and xeric shrublands Deserts and xeric shrublands
Deserts and xeric shrublands
are a biome characterized by receiving only a small amount of moisture,[1] usually defined as less than 250 mm of annual precipitation. They form the second-largest terrestrial biome (after Taiga), covering 19% of Earth's land surface area.[2]Contents1 Character of the biome 2 Desertification 3 Desert
Desert
and xeric shrublands ecoregions 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksCharacter of the biome[edit] Main article: Desert Further information: Xerophyte
Xerophyte
and XerocoleThis section does not cite any sources
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Chaparral
Chaparral
Chaparral
is a shrubland or heathland plant community found primarily in the US state of California
California
and in the northern portion of the Baja California
California
Peninsula, Mexico. It is shaped by a Mediterranean climate (mild, wet winters and hot dry summers) and wildfire, featuring summer-drought-tolerant plants with hard sclerophyllous evergreen leaves, as contrasted with the associated soft-leaved, drought-deciduous, scrub community of coastal sage scrub, found below the chaparral biome
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