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Kings Of Brega
The Kings of Brega were rulers of Brega, a petty kingdom north of Dublin
Dublin
in medieval Ireland.Contents1 Overview 2 Kings of Cnogba/Knowth 3 Kings of Lagore/Deiscert Breg (South Brega) 4 Notes 5 ReferencesOverview[edit] Brega took its name from Magh Breagh (Breá), meaning "fine plain", in modern County Meath, County Louth
County Louth
and County Dublin, Ireland. They formed part of the Uí Néill kindred, belonging to the Síl nÁedo Sláine branch of the southern Uí Néill. The kingdom of Brega included the Hill of Tara, the site where the High King of Ireland
High King of Ireland
was proclaimed. Brega was bounded on the east by the Irish Sea
Irish Sea
and on the south by the River Liffey. It extended northwards across the River Boyne to the foothills of County Louth
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Petty Kingdom
A petty kingdom is a kingdom described as minor or "petty" by contrast to an empire or unified kingdom that either preceded or succeeded it (e.g. the numerous kingdoms of Anglo-Saxon England
Anglo-Saxon England
unified into the Kingdom of England
Kingdom of England
in the 10th century, or the numerous Gaelic kingdoms of Ireland
Ireland
unified under the Kingdom of England
Kingdom of England
as the Kingdom of Ireland
Kingdom of Ireland
in the 16th)
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River Liffey
The River Liffey
River Liffey
(Irish: An Life) is a river in Ireland, which flows through the centre of Dublin. Its major tributaries include the River Dodder, the River Poddle
River Poddle
and the River Camac. The river supplies much of Dublin's water and a range of recreational activities.[1]Contents1 Name 2 Course and system2.1 Tributaries 2.2 Dams, reservoirs and falls 2.3 Settlements3 Navigation and uses3.1 Water supply 3.2 Electricity generation 3.3 Traffic 3.4 Recreational use4 Crossings4.1 History 4.2 Present day5 Quays 6 Incidents 7 Annalistic references 8 Popular culture references 9 See also 10 ReferencesName[edit] Ptolemy's Geography (2nd century AD) described a river, perhaps the Liffey, which he labelled Οβοκα (Oboka)
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Diarmait Mac Cerbaill
Diarmait mac Cerbaill
Diarmait mac Cerbaill
(died c. 565) was King of Tara or High King of Ireland. According to traditions, he was the last High King to follow the pagan rituals of inauguration, the ban-feis or marriage to goddess of the land. While many later stories were attached to Diarmait, he was a historical ruler and his descendants were of great significance in Medieval Ireland
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Norman Invasion Of Ireland
The Norman invasion of Ireland
Ireland
took place in stages during the late 12th century, at a time when Gaelic Ireland
Gaelic Ireland
was made up of several kingdoms, with a High King claiming lordship over all. In May 1169, Cambro-Norman
Cambro-Norman
mercenaries landed in Ireland
Ireland
at the request of Diarmait Mac Murchada
Diarmait Mac Murchada
(Dermot MacMurragh), the ousted King of Leinster, who had sought their help in regaining his kingdom. Diarmait and the Normans
Normans
seized Leinster
Leinster
within weeks and launched raids into neighbouring kingdoms. This military intervention had the backing of King Henry II of England
Henry II of England
and was authorized by Pope Adrian IV. In the summer of 1170, there were two further Norman landings, led by Richard "Strongbow" de Clare
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Fogartach Mac Néill
Mac
Mac
or MAC may refer to:Contents1 Common meanings 2 Arts, entertainment, and media2.1 Fictional entities 2.2 Other uses in arts, entertainment, and media3 Business and economics 4 Businesses and organizations4.1 Businesses 4.2 Government and military agencies 4.3 Non-profit organizations 4.4 Political groups 4.5 Schools 4.6 Sports organizations4.6.1 Clubs and teams 4.6.2 Conferences5 People5.1 Names 5.2 People with the nickname or professional name6 Places6.1 Inhabited places 6.2 Museums and arts center
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Diarmait Mac Áedo Sláine
Sláine or Slaine is an Irish given name. Notable persons and characters with this name include: Sláine ingen Briain (fl. 1014), daughter of Brian Boru and wife of Sigtrygg, king of Dublin Slaine Ní Conmara, a Gaelic-Irish Lady who died in 1498 Sláine mac Dela of the Fir Bolg, the first legendary High King of Ireland Slaine Kelly (born 1982), Irish actress Sláine (comics), comic book hero inspired by Celtic mythologySláine: The Roleplaying Game of Celtic Heroes, role-playing game based on the settingSlaine (rapper), hiphop MC from BostonThis page or section lists people that share the same given name
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Kingdom Of Mide
Meath (/ˈmiːð/; Old Irish: Mide Old Irish pronunciation: [ˈmʲiðʲe]; spelt Mí in Modern Irish) was a kingdom in Ireland for over 1000 years. Its name means "middle," denoting its location in the middle of the island. At its greatest extent, it included all of County Meath
County Meath
(which takes its name from the kingdom), all of Westmeath, and parts of Cavan, Dublin, Kildare, Longford, Louth and Offaly.Contents1 History 2 Province and diocese 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] Meath is traditionally said to have been created in the first century by Túathal Techtmar. The Uí Enechglaiss was an early dynasty of the region. An ogham stone found south of Slane
Slane
suggests they controlled that area in County Meath
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River Boyne
The River Boyne
River Boyne
(Irish: An Bhóinn or Abhainn na Bóinne) is a river in Leinster, Ireland, the course of which is about 112 kilometres (70 mi) long. It rises at Trinity Well, Newberry Hall, near Carbury, County Kildare, and flows towards the Northeast through County Meath
County Meath
to reach the Irish Sea
Irish Sea
between Mornington, County Meath, and Baltray, County Louth. Salmon
Salmon
and trout can be caught in the river, which is surrounded by the Boyne Valley. It is crossed just west of Drogheda
Drogheda
by the Boyne River Bridge, which carries the M1 motorway, and by the Boyne Viaduct, which carries the Dublin- Belfast
Belfast
railway line to the east
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Dublin
Dublin
Dublin
(/ˈdʌblɪn/, Irish: Baile Átha Cliath[11] Irish pronunciation: [ˌbʲlʲɑː ˈclʲiə]) is the capital of and largest city in Ireland.[12][13] Dublin
Dublin
is located in the province of Leinster
Leinster
on the east coast of Ireland, at the mouth of the River Liffey and bordered on the South by the Wicklow Mountains
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Irish Sea
The Irish Sea
Sea
(Irish: Muir Éireann / An Mhuir Mheann,[1] Manx: Y Keayn Yernagh,[2] Scots: Erse Sea, Scottish Gaelic: Muir Èireann,[3] Ulster-Scots: Airish Sea, Welsh: Môr Iwerddon) separates the islands of Ireland
Ireland
and Great Britain; linked to the Celtic Sea
Sea
in the south by St George's Channel, and to the Inner Seas off the West Coast of Scotland[4] in the north by the Straits of Moyle. Anglesey, Wales, is the largest island in the Irish Sea. The second in size is the Isle of Man
Isle of Man
and the sea may occasionally, but rarely, be referred to as the Manx Sea
Sea
(Irish: Muir Meann,[5] Manx: Mooir Vannin, Scottish Gaelic: Muir Mhanainn).[6][7][8] The Irish Sea
Sea
is of significant economic importance to regional trade, shipping and transport, fishing, and power generation in the form of wind power and nuclear power plants
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Hill Of Tara
The Hill of Tara
Hill of Tara
(Irish: Cnoc na Teamhrach,[2] Teamhair or Teamhair na Rí), located near the River Boyne, is an archaeological complex that runs between Navan
Navan
and Dunshaughlin
Dunshaughlin
in County Meath, Ireland
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County Dublin
County Dublin (Irish: Contae Bhaile Átha Cliath[1] or Contae Átha Cliath) is a county in Ireland. Since the abolition of Dublin County Council in 1994, for local government it has been divided into four administrative areas: Dublin city, Dún Laoghaire–Rathdown, Fingal and South Dublin (as numbered 1 to 4 in the figure below). The population of the entire county was 1,345,402 according to the census of 2016.[2] It is conterminous with the Dublin Region and is in the province of Leinster. It is named after the city of Dublin, which is the regional capital and the capital city of Ireland. County Dublin was one of the first parts of Ireland to be shired by John, King of England following the Norman invasion of Ireland. Since the abolition of the Dublin Regional Assembly by statutory instrument No
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County Louth
County Louth (Irish: Contae Lú)[3] is a county[4] in Ireland. It is in the province of Leinster and is part of the Border Region. It is named after the village of Louth. Louth County Council is the local authority for the county
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High King Of Ireland
The High Kings of Ireland
Ireland
(Irish: Ard- na hÉireann Irish pronunciation: [ˈa:ɾˠd̪ˠˌɾˠiː n̪ˠə ˈheːrʲən̪ˠ]) were sometimes historical and sometimes legendary figures who had, or who are claimed to have had, lordship over the whole of Ireland. Medieval and early modern Irish literature portrays an almost unbroken sequence of High Kings, ruling from the Hill of Tara
Hill of Tara
over a hierarchy of lesser kings, stretching back thousands of years
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County Meath
County Meath (/miːð/ MEEDH; Irish: Contae na Mí or simply an Mhí) is a county in Ireland. It is in the province of Leinster and is part of the Mid-East Region. It is named after the historic Kingdom of Meath (from Midhe meaning "middle" or "centre").[1] Meath County Council is the local authority for the county. According to the 2016 census, the population of the county is 195,044.[2] The county town of Meath is Navan (An Uaimh)
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