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Kingdom Of The Netherlands
The Kingdom of the Netherlands
Netherlands
(Dutch: Koninkrijk der Nederlanden; pronounced [ˈkoːnɪŋkrɛiɡ dɛr ˈneːdərlɑndə(n)] (listen)),[nb 2] commonly known as the Netherlands,[nb 3] is a sovereign state and constitutional monarchy with the large majority of its territory in Western Europe and with several small island territories in the Caribbean Sea, in the West Indies
West Indies
islands ( Leeward Islands
Leeward Islands
and Lesser Antilles). The four parts of the kingdom—the Netherlands, Aruba, Curaçao
Curaçao
and Sint Maarten—are constituent countries (landen in Dutch) and participate on a basis of equality as partners in the kingdom.[7] In practice, however, most of the kingdom's affairs are administered by the Netherlands—which comprises roughly 98% of the kingdom's land area and population—on behalf of the entire kingdom
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Minister Plenipotentiary Of Curaçao
The Minister Plenipotentiary of Curaçao
Curaçao
(Dutch: Gevolmachtigd Minister van Curaçao) represents the constituent country (Dutch: land) of Curaçao
Curaçao
in the Council of Ministers of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. The current Minister Plenipotentiary of Curaçao
Curaçao
is Anthony Begina.[1] The Minister Plenipotentiary and his cabinet are seated in the "Curaçaohuis" ( Curaçao
Curaçao
House) in The Hague
The Hague
(which was the location of the Antillenhuis before the dissolution of the Netherlands Antilles).[2] A significant difference between the Netherlands Ministers and the Ministers Plenipotentiary is that the former Ministers are accountable for their politics and policies to the Dutch parliament. The Ministers Plenipotentiary, however, are accountable to their national governments
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Parliamentary System
A parliamentary system is a system of democratic governance of a state where the executive branch derives its democratic legitimacy from its ability to command the confidence of the legislative branch, typically a parliament, and is also held accountable to that parliament. In a parliamentary system, the head of state is usually a different person from the head of government
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First French Empire
French Revolutionary Wars •  Constitution adopted 18 May 1804 •  Coronation of Napoleon
Napoleon
I 2 December 1804 •  Treaty of Tilsit 7 July 1807 •  Invasion of Russia 24 June 1812 •  Treaty of Fontainebleau 11 April 1814 •  Hundred Days 20 March – 7 July 1815Area •  1812 [4] 860,000 km2 (330,000 sq
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Republic
A republic (Latin: res publica) is a form of government in which the country is considered a "public matter", not the private concern or property of the rulers. The primary positions of power within a republic are not inherited, but are attained through democracy, oligarchy or autocracy
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Euro
The single currency[1]local namesЕвро (Bulgarian) Eυρώ (Greek) Euró (Hungarian) Eiro (Latvian) Euras (Lithuanian) Ewro (Maltese) Evro (Slovene)Banknotes €5, €10, €20, €50, €100, €200, €500 (until the end of 2018)Coins 1c, 2c, 5c, 10c, 20c, 50c, €1, €2DemographicsOfficial user(s) Eurozone
Eurozone
(19) Austria  Belgium  Cyprus[note 1]  Estonia  Finland  France[note 2]  Germany  Greece  Ireland  Italy[note 3]  Latvia  Lithuania  Luxembourg  Malta  Netherlands[n
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Spanish Empire
The Spanish Empire
Empire
(Spanish: Imperio Español) was one of the largest empires in history. At the time, it was not known as that by the Spanish with the monarch ruling kingdoms in Spain, his possessions in Italy and northern Europe, and in the "Spanish Indies," its New World territories and the Philippines.[1] From the late fifteenth century to the early nineteenth, Spain's crown of Castile controlled a huge overseas territory in the New World.[2][3] The crown's main source of wealth was from gold and silver mined in Mexico
Mexico
and Peru. The empire reached the peak of its military, political and economic power under the Spanish Habsburgs,[4] through most of the 16th and 17th centuries, and its greatest territorial extent under the House of Bourbon
House of Bourbon
in the 18th century
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Demonym
A demonym (/ˈdɛmənɪm/; from Greek δῆμος, dêmos, "people, tribe" and όνομα, ónoma, "name") or gentilic (from Latin gentilis, "of a clan, or gens")[1] is a word that identifies residents or natives of a particular place and is usually derived from the name of the place.[2] Examples of demonyms include Cochabambino, for a person from the city of Cochabamba; American for a person from the country called the United States
United States
of America; and Swahili, for a person of the Swahili coast. Demonyms do not always clearly distinguish place of origin or ethnicity from place of residence or citizenship, and many demonyms overlap with the ethnonym for the ethnically dominant group of a region. Thus a Thai may be any resident or citizen of Thailand
Thailand
of any ethnic group, or more narrowly a member of the Thai people. Conversely, some groups of people may be associated with multiple demonyms
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English Language
English is a West Germanic language
West Germanic language
that was first spoken in early medieval England
England
and is now a global lingua franca.[4][5] Named after the Angles, one of the Germanic tribes that migrated to England, it ultimately derives its name from the Anglia (Angeln) peninsula in the Baltic Sea. It is closely related to the Frisian languages, but its vocabulary has been significantly influenced by other Germanic languages, particularly Norse (a North Germanic
North Germanic
language), as well as by Latin
Latin
and Romance languages, especially French.[6] English has developed over the course of more than 1,400 years. The earliest forms of English, a set of Anglo-Frisian dialects brought to Great Britain by Anglo-Saxon settlers in the 5th century, are called Old English
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Papiamento
Papiamento
Papiamento
(English: /ˌpɑːpiəˈmɛntoʊ, ˌpæp-/)[4] or Papiamentu (English: /-ˈmɛntuː/) is a Portuguese-based creole language spoken in the Dutch West Indies. It is the most-widely spoken language on the Caribbean
Caribbean
ABC islands, having official status in Aruba and Curaçao
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West Frisian Language
West Frisian, or simply Frisian (Frysk; Dutch: Fries [ˈfris]) is a West Germanic language spoken mostly in the province of Friesland (Fryslân) in the north of the Netherlands, mostly by those of Frisian ancestry. It is the most widely spoken of the three Frisian languages. For English linguists West Frisian is notable as being the most closely related language to English outside of Britain.Contents1 Name 2 Speakers 3 Dialects 4 History4.1 Old Frisian 4.2 Middle Frisian and New Frisian5 Alphabet 6 Phonology 7 Grammar 8 Status 9 Folklore about relation to English 10 Westerlauwers Frisian 11 Sample text 12 See also 13 References 14 Further reading 15 External linksName[edit] The name "West Frisian" is only used outside the Netherlands, to distinguish this language from the closely related Frisian languages of Saterland Frisian and North Frisian spoken in Germany
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De Facto
In law and government, de facto (/deɪ ˈfæktoʊ/ or /di ˈfæktoʊ/[1]; Latin: de facto, "in fact"; Latin pronunciation: [deː ˈfaktoː]), describes practices that exist in reality, even if not legally recognised by official laws.[2][3][4] It is commonly used to refer to what happens in practice, in contrast with de jure ("in law"), which refers to things that happen according to law
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Act Of Abjuration
The Act of Abjuration (Dutch: Plakkaat van Verlatinghe, literally 'placard of abjuration'), is de facto the declaration of independence by many of the provinces of the Netherlands from Spain
Spain
in 1581, during the Dutch Revolt. Signed on 26 July 1581 in The Hague, the Act formally confirmed a decision made by the States General of the Netherlands
States General of the Netherlands
in Antwerp
Antwerp
four days earlier. It declared that all magistrates in the provinces making up the Union of Utrecht
Union of Utrecht
were freed from their oaths of allegiance to the King of Spain, Philip II
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Peace Of Westphalia
The Peace of Westphalia
Westphalia
(German: Westfälischer Friede) was a series of peace treaties signed between May and October 1648 in the Westphalian cities of Osnabrück
Osnabrück
and Münster, effectively ending the European wars of religion. These treaties ended the Thirty Years' War (1618–1648) in the Holy Roman Empire
Holy Roman Empire
between the Habsburgs and their Catholic allies on one side, and the Protestant
Protestant
powers (Sweden, Denmark, Dutch, and Holy Roman principalities) and their Catholic (France) Anti-Habsburg allies on the other. The treaties also ended the Eighty Years' War
Eighty Years' War
(1568–1648) between Spain and the Dutch Republic, with Spain formally recognising the independence of the Dutch Republic
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French Language
French (le français [lə fʁɑ̃sɛ] ( listen) or la langue française [la lɑ̃ɡ fʁɑ̃sɛz]) is a Romance language
Romance language
of the Indo-European family. It descended from the Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
of the Roman Empire, as did all Romance languages. French has evolved from Gallo-Romance, the spoken Latin
Latin
in Gaul, and more specifically in Northern Gaul. Its closest relatives are the other langues d'oïl—languages historically spoken in northern France
France
and in southern Belgium, which French (Francien) has largely supplanted. French was also influenced by native Celtic languages
Celtic languages
of Northern Roman Gaul
Gaul
like Gallia Belgica
Gallia Belgica
and by the (Germanic) Frankish language of the post-Roman Frankish invaders
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ISO 4217
Standard which delineates currency designators and country codes An airline ticket showing the price in the ISO 4217
ISO 4217
code "EUR" (bottom left) and not the currency sign € ISO 4217
ISO 4217
is a standard first published by International Organization for Standardization in 1978, which delineates currency designators, country codes (alpha and numeric), and references to minor units in three tables:Table A.1 – Current currency & funds code list[1] Table A.2 – Current funds codes[2] Table A.3 – List of codes for historic denominations of currencies & funds[3] The tables, history and ongoing discussion are maintained by SIX Interbank Clearing on behalf of ISO and the Swiss Association for Standardization.[4] The ISO 4217
ISO 4217
code list is used in banking and business globally
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