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King Lot
Lot or Loth /ˈlɒt/ is the king of Lothian
Lothian
in the Arthurian legend. He is best known as the father of Sir Gawain. Such a ruler first appeared late in the 1st millennium's hagiographical material concerning Saint Kentigern
Saint Kentigern
(also known as Saint Mungo), which feature a Leudonus, king of Leudonia, a Latin
Latin
name for Lothian. In the 12th century, Geoffrey of Monmouth adapted this to Lot, king of Lothian, in his influential chronicle Historia Regum Britanniae, portraying him as King Arthur's brother-in-law and ally. In the wake of Geoffrey's writings, Lot appeared regularly in later romance. Lot chiefly figures as king of Lothian, but in other sources he also rules Orkney
Orkney
and sometimes Norway. He is generally depicted as the husband of Arthur's sister or half-sister, variously named Anna or Morgause
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Kamehameha V
Kamehameha V
Kamehameha V
(1830–1872), born as Lot Kapuāiwa, reigned as the fifth monarch of the Kingdom of Hawaiʻi from 1863 to 1872. His motto was "Onipaʻa": immovable, firm, steadfast or determined; he worked diligently for his people and kingdom and was described as the last great traditional chief.[2] His full Hawaiian name prior to his succession was Lota Kapuāiwa Kalanimakua Aliʻiōlani Kalanikupuapaʻīkalaninui.[3]Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 New constitution and new laws 4 Growth in travel to Hawaii 5 Succession 6 Legacy 7 References 8 Bibliography 9 Further reading 10 External linksEarly life[edit]Prince Lot Kapuāiwa, traveling abroad in 1850.He was born and given the name Lot Kapuāiwa December 11, 1830. His mother was Elizabeth Kīnaʻu
Kīnaʻu
and father was Mataio Kekūanāoʻa
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Saxons
The Saxons
Saxons
(Latin: Saxones, Old English: Seaxe, Old Saxon: Sahson, Low German: Sassen) were a group of Germanic tribes first mentioned as living near the North Sea
North Sea
coast of what is now Germany
Germany
(Old Saxony), in the late Roman Empire. They were soon mentioned as raiding and settling in many North Sea
North Sea
areas, as well as pushing south inland towards the Franks
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Latinisation (literature)
Latinisation (also spelled Latinization[1]: see spelling differences) is the practice of rendering a non- Latin
Latin
name (or word) in a Latin style.[1] It is commonly found with historical personal names, with toponyms and in the standard binomial nomenclature of the life sciences. It goes further than romanisation, which is the transliteration of a word to the Latin
Latin
alphabet from another script (e.g. Cyrillic). This was often done in the classical to emulate Latin
Latin
authors, or to present a more impressive image. In a scientific context, the main purpose of Latinisation may be to produce a name which is internationally consistent. Latinisation may be carried out by:transforming the name into Latin
Latin
sounds (e.g. Geber for Jabir), or adding Latinate suffixes to the end of a name (e.g
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Colchester
Colchester
Colchester
/ˈkoʊltʃɛstər/ ( listen)[1] is an historic market town and the largest settlement within the borough of Colchester
Colchester
in the county of Essex. At the time of the 2011 UK Census, it had a population of 121,859, marking a considerable rise from the previous census and with considerable development since 2001 and ongoing building plans; it has been named as one of Britain's fastest growing towns.[2] As the oldest recorded Roman town in Britain, Colchester
Colchester
is claimed to be the oldest town in Britain.[3] It was for a time the capital of Roman Britain, and is a member of the Most Ancient European Towns Network.[4] Colchester
Colchester
is some 50 miles (80 km) northeast of London and is connected to the capital by the A12 road and its railway station which is on the Great Eastern Main Line
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William Of Malmesbury
William of Malmesbury
Malmesbury
(Latin: Willelmus Malmesbiriensis; c. 1095 – c. 1143) was the foremost English historian of the 12th century. He has been ranked among the most talented English historians since Bede. Modern historian C. Warren Hollister described him as "a gifted historical scholar and an omnivorous reader, impressively well versed in the literature of classical, patristic and earlier medieval times as well as in the writings of his own contemporaries. Indeed William may well have been the most learned man in twelfth-century Western Europe."[1] William was born about 1095 or 1096[2] in Wiltshire
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Galloway
Galloway
Galloway
(Scottish Gaelic: Gall-Ghàidhealaibh, Latin: Gallovidia)[1] is a region in southwestern Scotland
Scotland
comprising the historic counties of
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Rheged
Rheged
Rheged
(Welsh pronunciation: [ˈr̥ɛɡɛd]) was one of the kingdoms of the Hen Ogledd
Hen Ogledd
("Old North"), the Brittonic-speaking region of what is now Northern England
Northern England
and southern Scotland, during the post-Roman era and Early Middle Ages. It is recorded in several poetic and bardic sources, although its borders are not described in any of them
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Moray
Moray
Moray
(/ˈmʌri/ MURR-ee; Scottish Gaelic: Moireibh or Moireabh, Latin: Moravia, Old Norse: Mýræfi) is one of the 32 Local Government council areas of Scotland
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Scotland
Scotland
Scotland
(/ˈskɒtlənd/; Scots: [ˈskɔtlənd]; Scottish Gaelic: Alba
Alba
[ˈal̪ˠapə] ( listen)) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and covers the northern third of the island of Great Britain.[16][17][18] It shares a border with England
England
to the south, and is otherwise surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, with the North Sea
North Sea
to the east and the North Channel and Irish Sea
Irish Sea
to the south-west. In addition to the mainland, the country is made up of more than 790 islands,[19] including the Northern Isles
Northern Isles
and the Hebrides. The Kingdom of Scotland
Kingdom of Scotland
emerged as an independent sovereign state in the Early Middle Ages
Early Middle Ages
and continued to exist until 1707
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Romance (heroic Literature)
As a literary genre of high culture, romance or chivalric romance is a type of prose and verse narrative that was popular in the aristocratic circles of High Medieval
Medieval
and Early Modern Europe. They were fantastic stories about marvel-filled adventures, often of a knight-errant portrayed as having heroic qualities, who goes on a quest, yet it is "the emphasis on love and courtly manners distinguishes it from the chanson de geste and other kinds of epic, in which masculine military heroism predominates."[1] Popular literature also drew on themes of romance, but with ironic, satiric or burlesque intent. Romances reworked legends, fairy tales, and history to suit the readers' and hearers' tastes, but by c. 1600 they were out of fashion, and Miguel de Cervantes famously burlesqued them in his novel Don Quixote
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Saint Serf
Orthodox Church Roman Catholic Church Scottish Episcopal ChurchFeast 1 July Saint Serf
Saint Serf
or Serbán (Servanus) (c. 500 — d. 583 AD) is a saint of Scotland. Serf was venerated in western Fife. He is called the apostle of Orkney, with less historical plausibility. Saint Serf
Saint Serf
is connected with Saint Mungo's Church near Simonburn, Northumberland
Northumberland
(off the Bellingham Road, north of Chollerford). His feast day is 1 July.Contents1 Legends1.1 Serf and Mungo2 Churches 3 Notes 4 External linksLegends[edit] Saint Serf
Saint Serf
is said to have founded the Scottish town of Culross.David Hugh Farmer wrote that the legend of Serf is "a farrago of wild impossibilities"[1] stating that Serf was the son of Eliud, King of Canaan, and his wife Alphia, daughter of a King of Arabia. Childless for a long time, they at last had two sons: the second was Serf
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Chrétien De Troyes
Chrétien de Troyes
Troyes
(French: [kʁe.tjɛ̃ də.tʁwa]) was a late-12th-century French poet and trouvère known for his work on Arthurian subjects, and for originating the character Lancelot. This work represents some of the best-regarded of medieval literature. His use of structure, particularly in Yvain, the Knight of the Lion, has been seen as a step towards the modern novel
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Roger Sherman Loomis
Roger Sherman
Roger Sherman
Loomis (October 31, 1887 – October 11, 1966) was an American scholar and one of the foremost authorities on medieval and Arthurian literature. Loomis is perhaps best known for showing the roots of Arthurian legend, in particular the Holy Grail, in native Celtic mythology.Contents1 Biography 2 Works 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Roger Sherman
Roger Sherman
Loomis was the son of Henry Loomis and Jane Herring Greene, the great nephew of William Maxwell Evarts
William Maxwell Evarts
and the great-great grandson of American founding father Roger Sherman. Born in Yokohama, Japan, he was educated at The Hotchkiss School
The Hotchkiss School
Lakeville, Connecticut. He earned a B.A. from Williams College
Williams College
in 1909, an M.A
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Yvain, Or The Knight Of The Lion
Yvain, the Knight
Knight
of the Lion (French: Yvain
Yvain
ou le Chevalier au Lion) is an Arthurian romance by French poet Chrétien de Troyes. It was probably written in the 1170s simultaneously with Lancelot, the Knight of the Cart, and includes several references to the narrative of that poem. It is a story of knight-errantry, in which the protagonist Yvain
Yvain
is first rejected by his lady for breaking a promise, and subsequently performs a number of heroic deeds in order to regain her favor.Contents1 Summary 2 Sources and reception 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksSummary[edit] Yvain
Yvain
rescues the lion from the dragon, (French, 15th century)In the narrative, Yvain
Yvain
seeks to avenge his cousin, Calogrenant, who had been defeated by an otherworldly knight Esclados beside a magical storm-making stone in the forest of Brocéliande
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Laudine
Laudine
Laudine
is a character in Chrétien de Troyes's 12th-century romance Yvain, or, The Knight with the Lion
Yvain, or, The Knight with the Lion
and all of its adaptations, which include the Welsh tale of Owain, or the Lady of the Fountain and the German epic Iwein
Iwein
by Hartmann von Aue. Usually known as the Lady
Lady
of the Fountain, she becomes the wife of the poem's protagonist, Yvain, one of the knights of King Arthur's Round Table, after he kills her husband, but later spurns the knight-errant when he neglects her for heroic adventure, only to take him back in the end. Chrétien calls her "la dame de Landuc", i.e. the noblewoman in command of the territory and castle of "Landuc", located near a supernatural fountain within the enchanted forest of Brocéliande
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