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Khmer Script
Egyptian hieroglyphs
Egyptian hieroglyphs
32 c. BCE Hieratic
Hieratic
32 c. BCEDemotic 7 c. BCEMeroitic 3 c. BCEProto-Sinaitic 19 c. BCEUgaritic 15 c. BCE Epigraphic South Arabian 9 c. BCEGe’ez 5–6 c. BCEPhoenician 12 c. BCEPaleo-Hebrew 10 c. BCESamaritan 6 c. BCE Libyco-Berber
Libyco-Berber
3 c. BCETifinaghPaleohispanic (semi-syllabic) 7 c. BCE Aramaic 8 c. BCE Kharoṣṭhī
Kharoṣṭhī
4 c. BCE Brāhmī 4 c. BCE Brahmic family
Brahmic family
(see)E.g. Tibetan 7 c. CE Devanagari
Devanagari
13 c. CECanadian syllabics 1840Hebrew 3 c. BCE Pahlavi 3 c. BCEAvestan 4 c. CEPalmyrene 2 c. BCE Syriac 2 c. BCENabataean 2 c. BCEArabic 4 c. CEN'Ko 1949 CESogdian 2 c. BCEOrkhon (old Turkic) 6 c. CEOld Hungarian c. 650 CEOld UyghurMongolian 1204 CEMandaic 2 c. CEGreek 8 c. BCEEtruscan 8 c. BCELatin 7 c
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Abugida
An abugida /ˌɑːbʊˈɡiːdə/ (from Ge'ez: አቡጊዳ ’abugida), or alphasyllabary, is a segmental writing system in which consonant–vowel sequences are written as a unit: each unit is based on a consonant letter, and vowel notation is secondary. This contrasts with a full alphabet, in which vowels have status equal to consonants, and with an abjad, in which vowel marking is absent, partial, or optional
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Ranjana Script
The Rañjanā script (syn: Kutila, Lantsa[1]) is an abugida writing system which developed in the 11th century.[2] It is primarily used for writing the Newar language
Newar language
but is also used in Buddhist monasteries in India, China, Mongolia, and Japan.[2] It is normally written from left to right but the Kutakshar form is written from top to bottom.[2] It is also considered to be the standard Nepali calligraphic script.Contents1 Development 2 Alphabet2.1 Vowels 2.2 Consonants 2.3 Vowel diacritics 2.4 Numerals3 Use 4 Lanydza 5 Monogram
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Mahajani
U+11150–U+1117F Final Accepted Script Proposal[a] The Semitic origin of the Brahmic scripts
Brahmic scripts
is not universally agreed upon.Brahmic scriptsThe Brahmic script
Brahmic script
and its descendantsNorthern Brah
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Takri Alphabet
The Takri script (sometimes called Tankri) is an abugida writing system of the Brahmic family
Brahmic family
of scripts. It is closely related to, and derived from, the Sharada script
Sharada script
formerly employed for Kashmiri. It is also related to the Gurmukhī script
Gurmukhī script
used to write Punjabi. Until the late 1940s, an adapted version of the script (called Dogri, Dogra or Dogra Akkhar) was the official script for writing Dogri in the state of Jammu and Kashmir, and for Kangri, Chambeali and Mandeali in Himachal Pradesh
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Tibetan Alphabet
Egyptian hieroglyphs
Egyptian hieroglyphs
32 c. BCE Hieratic
Hieratic
32 c. BCEDemotic 7 c. BCEMeroitic 3 c. BCEProto-Sinaitic 19 c. BCEUgaritic 15 c. BCE Epigraphic South Arabian 9 c. BCEGe’ez 5–6 c. BCEPhoenician 12 c. BCEPaleo-Hebrew 10 c. BCESamaritan 6 c. BCE Libyco-Berber
Libyco-Berber
3 c. BCETifinaghPaleohispanic (semi-syllabic) 7 c. BCE Aramaic 8 c. BCE Kharoṣṭhī
Kharoṣṭhī
4 c. BCE Brāhmī 4 c. BCE Brahmic family
Brahmic family
(see)E.g. Tibetan 7 c. CE Devanagari
Devanagari
13 c. CECanadian syllabics 1840Hebrew 3 c. BCE Pahlavi 3 c. BCEAvestan 4 c. CEPalmyrene 2 c. BCE Syriac 2 c. BCENabataean 2 c. BCEArabic 4 c. CEN'Ko 1949 CESogdian 2 c. BCEOrkhon (old Turkic) 6 c. CEOld Hungarian c. 650 CEOld UyghurMongolian 1204 CEMandaic 2 c. CEGreek 8 c. BCEEtruscan 8 c. BCELatin 7 c
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'Phags-pa Script
The ‘Phags-pa script[1] (Mongolian: дөрвөлжин үсэг "Square script") is an alphabet designed by the Tibetan monk and State Preceptor (later Imperial Preceptor) Drogön Chögyal Phagpa
Drogön Chögyal Phagpa
for Kublai Khan, the founder of the Yuan dynasty, as a unified script for the written languages within the Yuan. The actual use of this script was limited to about a hundred years during the Mongol Yuan dynasty, and it fell out of use with the advent of the Ming dynasty
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Meithei Script
The Meitei script, Meetei Mayek, is an abugida that was used for the Meitei language, one of the official languages of the Indian state of Manipur, until the eighteenth century, when it was replaced by the Bengali script. A few manuscripts survive. In the twentieth century, the script experienced a resurgence. Since Meitei does not have voiced consonants, there are only fifteen consonant letters used for native words, plus three letters for pure vowels. Nine additional consonant letters inherited from the Indic languages are available for borrowings. There are seven vowel diacritics and a final consonant (/ŋ/) diacritic. One of the unique feature of this script is the use of body parts in naming the letters. Every letter is named after a human body part in the Meitei language. For example, the first letter "kok" means "head"; the second letter "sam" means "hair"; the third letter "lai" means "forehead", and so on
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Lepcha Alphabet
The Lepcha script, or Róng script, is an abugida used by the Lepcha people to write the Lepcha language. Unusually for an abugida, syllable-final consonants are written as diacritics.Contents1 History 2 Typology 3 Unicode 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Lepcha is derived from the Tibetan script, and may have some Burmese influence. According to tradition, it was devised in the beginning of 18th century by prince Chakdor Namgyal of the Tibetan dynasty in Sikkim, or by scholar Thikúng Men Salóng in the 17th century. Early Lepcha manuscripts were written vertically, a sign of Chinese influence. When they were later written horizontally, the letters remained in their new orientations, rotated 90° from their Tibetan prototypes
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Limbu Alphabet
The Limbu
Limbu
script is used to write the Limbu
Limbu
language. It is a Brahmic type abugida.[1]Contents1 History1.1 Accounts with Sirijunga2 Structure 3 Obsolete characters 4 Punctuation 5 Digits 6 Unicode 7 ReferencesHistory[edit] According to traditional histories, the Limbu
Limbu
script was first invented in the late 9th century by King Sirijunga Hang, then fell out of use, to be reintroduced in the 18th century by Te-ongsi Sirijunga Xin Thebe during the time, teaching of the limbu script was outlawed by the monarchy in Sikkim, as it posed a threat to the Monarchy. Accounts with Sirijunga[edit] Limbu language
Limbu language
is one of the few Sino-Tibetan languages
Sino-Tibetan languages
of the Central Himalayas
Himalayas
to possess their own scripts
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Siddhaṃ Script
U+11580–U+115FF Final Accepted Script Proposal Variant FormsSiddhaṃ, also known in its later evolved form as Siddhamātṛkā,[1] is a script used for writing Sanskrit
Sanskrit
from c. 550 – c. 1200.[2] It is descended from the Brahmi script
Brahmi script
via the Gupta script and later evolved into the Assamese alphabet, the Maithili alphabet[3], the Bengali alphabet, and the Tibetan alphabet
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Nepal Script
The Nepalese scripts
Nepalese scripts
are alphabetic writing systems of Nepal. They have been used primarily to write both the national Indo-European language of Nepali plus some Tibeto-Burman languages such as Newari (also known locally as Nepal
Nepal
Bhasa).[1][2] The older alphabets, known as Brahmic scripts, were in widespread use from the 10th to the early 20th-century A.C.E., but have since been largely supplanted by the modern script known as Devanagari
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Bhujimol
Bhujimol
Bhujimol
(or Bhujinmol, Devanagari: भुजिमोल or भुजिंमोल) is the most ancient form of Nepal
Nepal
script. It is also one of the most common varieties of the Nepal
Nepal
alphabet.[1] Bhujimol
Bhujimol
has been used to write Nepal
Nepal
Bhasa and Sanskrit. Etymology[edit] Bhujimol
Bhujimol
compared to other historical scripts of Nepal.The term Bhujinmol means "fly-headed", from the Nepal
Nepal
Bhasa words "bhujin", meaning "housefly", and "mol", meaning "head"
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Soyombo Alphabet
The Soyombo alphabet
Soyombo alphabet
(Mongolian: Соёмбо бичиг, Soyombo biçig) is an abugida developed by the monk and scholar Zanabazar
Zanabazar
in 1686 to write Mongolian. It can also be used to write Tibetan and Sanskrit. A special character of the script, the Soyombo symbol, became a national symbol of Mongolia, and has appeared on the national flag since 1921, and on the Emblem of Mongolia
Mongolia
since 1960, as well as money, stamps, etc.Contents1 Creation 2 Use 3 Form 4 Alphabet4.1 Mongolian4.1.1 Vowels 4.1.2 Consonants4.2 Sanskrit
Sanskrit
and Tibetan4.2.1 Vowels 4.2.2 Consonants5 Punctuation 6 Unicode 7 See also 8 References 9 External links 10 Further readingCreation[edit] The Soyombo script was created as the fourth Mongolian script, only 38 years after the invention of the Clear script. The name of the script alludes to this story
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Khudabadi Script
Khudabadi is a script generally used by some Sindhis in India to write the Sindhi language. It is also known as Vaniki, Hatvaniki and Hatkai script. Khudabadi is one of the three scripts used for writing the Sindhi language, the other being Perso-Arabic
Perso-Arabic
and Devanagari script.[2] It was used by traders and merchants to record their information and rose to importance as the script began to be used to record information kept secret from other groups and kingdoms. Modern Khudabadi has 37 consonants, 10 vowels, 9 vowel signs written as diacritic marks added to the consonants, 3 miscellaneous signs, one symbol for nasal sounds (anusvara), one symbol for conjucts (virama) and 10 digits like many other Indic scripts. The nukta has been borrowed from Devanagari
Devanagari
for representing additional signs found in Arabic
Arabic
but not found in Sindhi. It is written from left to right, like Sanskrit
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Prachalit Nepal Script
Script
Script
may refer to:Contents1 Writing systems 2 Arts and entertainment 3 Science and technology3.1 Computing 3.2 Medicine and psychology4 Other uses 5 See alsoWriting systems[edit] Script
Script
(Unicode), collections of letters and other written signs used to represent textual i
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