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Khmer Script
Egyptian hieroglyphs 32 c. BCE * Hieratic 32 c. BCE * Demotic 7 c. BCE * Meroitic 3 c. BCE* Proto-Sinaitic 19 c. BCE * Ugaritic 15 c. BCE* Epigraphic South Arabian 9 c. BCE * Ge’ez 5–6 c. BCE* Phoenician 12 c. BCE * Paleo-Hebrew 10 c. BCE * Samaritan 6 c. BCE* Libyco-Berber
Libyco-Berber
3 c. BCE * Tifinagh * Paleohispanic (semi-syllabic) 7 c. BCE* Aramaic 8 c. BCE * Kharoṣṭhī
Kharoṣṭhī
4 c. BCE* Brāhmī 4 c. BCE * Brahmic family (see) * E.g. Tibetan 7 c. CE * Hangul (core letters only) 1443* Devanagari 13 c. CE * Canadian syllabics 1840 * Hebrew 3 c. BCE* Pahlavi 3 c. BCE * Avestan 4 c. CE * Palmyrene 2 c. BCE* Syriac 2 c. BCE * Nabataean 2 c. BCE * Arabic 4 c. CE * N\'Ko 1949 CE* Sogdian 2 c. BCE * Orkhon (old Turkic) 6 c. CE * Old Hungarian c
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Lepcha Alphabet
The LEPCHA SCRIPT, or RóNG SCRIPT, is an abugida used by the Lepcha people to write the Lepcha language . Unusually for an abugida, syllable-final consonants are written as diacritics. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Typology * 3 Unicode
Unicode
* 4 References * 5 External links HISTORYLepcha is derived from the Tibetan script , and may have some Burmese influence. According to tradition, it was devised in the beginning of 18th century by prince Chakdor Namgyal of the Tibetan dynasty in Sikkim
Sikkim
, or by scholar Thikúng Men Salóng in the 17th century. Early Lepcha manuscripts were written vertically, a sign of Chinese influence. When they were later written horizontally, the letters remained in their new orientations, rotated 90° from their Tibetan prototypes. This resulted in an unusual method of writing final consonants
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Soyombo Alphabet
The SOYOMBO ALPHABET (Mongolian : Соёмбо бичиг, Soyombo biçig) is an abugida developed by the monk and scholar Zanabazar in 1686 to write Mongolian. It can also be used to write Tibetan and Sanskrit . A special character of the script, the Soyombo symbol , became a national symbol of Mongolia
Mongolia
, and has appeared on the national flag since 1921, and on the Emblem of Mongolia
Mongolia
since 1960, as well as money, stamps, etc. CONTENTS * 1 Creation * 2 Use * 3 Form * 4 Alphabet * 4.1 Mongolian * 4.1.1 Vowels * 4.1.2 Consonants * 4.2 Sanskrit and Tibetan * 4.2.1 Vowels * 4.2.2 Consonants * 5 Punctuation * 6 Unicode * 7 See also * 8 References * 9 External links * 10 Further reading CREATIONThe Soyombo script was created as the fourth Mongolian script, only 38 years after the invention of the Clear script
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Limbu Alphabet
The LIMBU SCRIPT is used to write the Limbu language
Limbu language
. The Limbu script is an abugida derived from the Tibetan script . CONTENTS* 1 History * 1.1 Accounts with Sirijunga * 2 Structure * 3 Unicode * 3.1 Block * 3.2 Font support * 4 References * 5 External links HISTORYAccording to traditional histories, the Limbu script
Limbu script
was first invented in the late 9th century by King Sirijunga Hang, then fell out of use, to be reintroduced in the 18th century by Te-ongsi Sirijunga Xin Thebe during the time, teaching of the limbu script was outlawed by the monarchy in Sikkim, as it posed a threat to the Monarchy. ACCOUNTS WITH SIRIJUNGA Limbu , Lepcha and Nepal Bhasa are the only Sino-Tibetan languages of the Central Himalayas
Himalayas
to possess their own scripts
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Nāgarī Script
The NāGARī SCRIPT is the ancestor of Devanagari
Devanagari
, Nandinagari and other variants, and was first used to write Prakrit
Prakrit
and Sanskrit
Sanskrit
. The term is sometimes used as a synonym for Devanagari
Devanagari
script. It came in vogue during the first millennium CE. The Nāgarī script
Nāgarī script
has roots in the ancient Brahmi script
Brahmi script
family. Some of the earliest epigraph evidence attesting to the developing Sanskrit
Sanskrit
Nāgarī script
Nāgarī script
in ancient India is from the 1st to 4th century CE inscriptions discovered in Gujarat
Gujarat

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Devanagari
DEVANAGARI (/ˌdeɪvəˈnɑːɡəri/ DAY-və-NAH-gə-ree ; देवनागरी, IAST : Devanāgarī, a compound of "deva " दे and "nāgarī " नागरी; Hindi
Hindi
pronunciation: ; ), also called NAGARI (Nāgarī, नागरी), is an abugida (alphasyllabary) alphabet of India
India
and Nepal
Nepal
. It is written from left to right, has a strong preference for symmetrical rounded shapes within squared outlines, and is recognisable by a horizontal line that runs along the top of full letters. In a cursory look, the Devanagari script appears different from other Indic scripts such as Bengali-Assamese , Odia , or Gurmukhi , but a closer examination reveals they are very similar except for angles and structural emphasis. The Nagari script has roots in the ancient Brāhmī script
Brāhmī script
family
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'Phags-pa Script
The ‘PHAGS-PA SCRIPT (Mongolian : дөрвөлжин үсэг "Square script") is an alphabet designed by the Tibetan monk and State Preceptor (later Imperial Preceptor ) Drogön Chögyal Phagpa for Kublai Khan
Kublai Khan
, the founder of the Yuan dynasty
Yuan dynasty
, as a unified script for the written languages within the Yuan. The actual use of this script was limited to about a hundred years during the Mongol Yuan dynasty, and it fell out of use with the advent of the Ming dynasty . The documentation of its use provides clues about the changes in the varieties of Chinese , the Tibetic languages , Mongolian and other neighboring languages during the Yuan era
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Tibetan Alphabet
Egyptian hieroglyphs
Egyptian hieroglyphs
32 c. BCE * Hieratic 32 c. BCE * Demotic 7 c. BCE * Meroitic 3 c. BCE* Proto-Sinaitic 19 c. BCE * Ugaritic 15 c. BCE* Epigraphic South Arabian 9 c. BCE * Ge’ez 5–6 c. BCE* Phoenician 12 c. BCE * Paleo-Hebrew 10 c. BCE * Samaritan 6 c. BCE* Libyco-Berber 3 c. BCE * Tifinagh * Paleohispanic (semi-syllabic) 7 c. BCE* Aramaic 8 c. BCE * Kharoṣṭhī 4 c. BCE* Brāhmī 4 c. BCE * Brahmic family
Brahmic family
(see) * E.g. Tibetan 7 c. CE * Hangul
Hangul
(core letters only) 1443* Devanagari 13 c. CE * Canadian syllabics 1840 * Hebrew 3 c. BCE* Pahlavi 3 c. BCE * Avestan 4 c. CE * Palmyrene 2 c. BCE* Syriac 2 c. BCE * Nabataean 2 c. BCE * Arabic 4 c. CE * N\'Ko 1949 CE* Sogdian 2 c. BCE * Orkhon (old Turkic) 6 c. CE * Old Hungarian c
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Mahajani
U+11150–U+1117F Final Accepted Script Proposal The Semitic origin of the Brahmic scripts
Brahmic scripts
is not universally agreed upon
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Takri Alphabet
The TAKRI SCRIPT (sometimes called Tankri) is an abugida writing system of the Brahmic family
Brahmic family
of scripts. It is closely related to, and derived from, the Sharada script
Sharada script
employed by Kashmiri . It is also related to the Gurmukhī script used to write Punjabi . Until the late 1940s, And adopted version script of Takri (called DOGRI, DOGRA or DOGRA AKHTAR)was the official script for writing the Dogri in the state of Jammu and Kashmir
Jammu and Kashmir
and Kangri, Cahmbeali, Mandeali in Himachal Pradesh . There are some record of using Takri script in the history of Nepali (Khas Kura)
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Siddhaṃ Script
U+11580–U+115FF Final Accepted Script Proposal Variant Forms SIDDHAṃ, also known in its later evolved form as SIDDHAMāTṛKā, is the name of a script used for writing Sanskrit
Sanskrit
from c. 550 – c. 1200. It is descended from the Brahmi script
Brahmi script
via the Gupta script
Gupta script
and later evolved into the Assamese alphabet , the Bengali alphabet , and the Tibetan alphabet
Tibetan alphabet
. There is some confusion over the spelling: Siddhāṃ and Siddhaṃ are both common, though Siddhaṃ is preferred as "correct". The script is a refinement of the script used during the Gupta Empire
Gupta Empire

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Gujarati Alphabet
The GUJARATI SCRIPT (ગુજરાતી લિપિ Gujǎrātī Lipi) is an abugida , like all Nagari
Nagari
writing systems, and is used to write the Gujarati and Kutchi languages. It is a variant of Devanagari script differentiated by the loss of the characteristic horizontal line running above the letters and by a number of modifications to some characters. Gujarati numerical digits are also different from their Devanagari counterparts
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Modi Alphabet
U+11600–U+1165F Final Accepted Script Proposal MODI (Marathi : मोडी, Mōḍī, Marathi pronunciation: ) is a script used to write the Marathi language
Marathi language
, which is the primary language spoken in the state of Maharashtra
Maharashtra
, India . There are at least two different theories concerning its origin. Modi was an official script used to write Marathi until the 20th century when the Balbodh style of the Devanagari
Devanagari
script was promoted as the standard writing system for Marathi. Although Modi was primarily used to write Marathi, other languages such as Urdu
Urdu
, Kannada
Kannada
, Gujarati , Rajasthani , Hindi
Hindi
and Tamil are also known to have been written in Modi
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Bhujimol
BHUJIMOL (or Bhujinmol, Devanagari
Devanagari
: भुजिमोल or भुजिंमोल) is the most ancient form of Nepal
Nepal
script . It is also one of the most common varieties of the Nepal
Nepal
alphabet. Bhujimol
Bhujimol
has been used to write Nepal
Nepal
Bhasa and Sanskrit
Sanskrit
. ETYMOLOGY Bhujimol
Bhujimol
compared to other historical scripts of Nepal. The term Bhujinmol means "fly-headed", from the Nepal
Nepal
Bhasa words "bhujin", meaning "housefly", and "mol", meaning "head". The "head" is the horizontal line that is put above each letter, and Bhujimol
Bhujimol
refers to its rounded shape. RECENT FINDINGS Chart of Bhujimol
Bhujimol
script vowel letters, with Devanagari
Devanagari
and Latin correspondences
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Prachalit Nepal Alphabet
PRACHALIT NEPAL SCRIPT is a type of Abugida script developed from the Mol script derivatives of Brahmi script
Brahmi script
. It is used to write Nepal Bhasa , Sanskrit
Sanskrit
and Pali
Pali
. Various publications are still published in this script including the Sikkim
Sikkim
Herald the bulletin of the Sikkim government (Newari edition). CONTENTS * 1 Unicode
Unicode
* 2 See also * 3 Bibliography * 4 References * 5 External links UNICODE Main article: Newa (Unicode block) Prachalit Nepal script was added to the