HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Karl Popper
Sir Karl Raimund Popper CH FBA FRS[7] (28 July 1902 – 17 September 1994) was an Austrian-British philosopher and professor.[8][9][10] He is generally regarded as one of the 20th century's greatest philosophers of science.[11][12][13] Popper is known for his rejection of the classical inductivist views on the scientific method, in favour of empirical falsification: A theory in the empirical sciences can never be proven, but it can be falsified, meaning that it can and should be scrutinized by decisive experiments. Popper is also known for his opposition to the classical justificationist account of knowledge, which he replaced with critical rationalism, namely "the first non-justificational philosophy of criticism in the history of philosophy."[14] In political discourse, he is known for his vigorous defence of liberal democracy and the principles of social criticism that he came to believe made a flourishing open society possible
[...More...]

"Karl Popper" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Companion Of Honour
The Order of the Companions of Honour
Order of the Companions of Honour
is an order of the Commonwealth realms
[...More...]

"Companion Of Honour" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Philosophical Realism
Realism (in philosophy) about a given object is the view that this object exists in reality independently of our conceptual scheme
[...More...]

"Philosophical Realism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Darwinism
Darwinism
Darwinism
is a theory of biological evolution developed by the English naturalist Charles Darwin
Charles Darwin
(1809–1882) and others, stating that all species of organisms arise and develop through the natural selection of small, inherited variations that increase the individual's ability to compete, survive, and reproduce. Also called Darwinian theory, it originally included the broad concepts of transmutation of species or of evolution which gained general scientific acceptance after Darwin published On the Origin of Species
Species
in 1859, including concepts which predated Darwin's theories
[...More...]

"Darwinism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Probability
Related concepts and fundamentals:Agnosticism Epistemology Presupposition Probabilityv t e Probability
Probability
is the measure of the likelihood that an event will occur.[1] See glossary of probability and statistics. Probability
Probability
is quantified as a number between 0 and 1, where, loosely speaking,[2] 0 indicates impossibility and 1 indicates certainty.[3][4] The higher the probability of an event, the more likely it is that the event will occur
[...More...]

"Probability" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Quantum Mechanics
Quantum mechanics (QM; also known as quantum physics or quantum theory), including quantum field theory, is a fundamental theory in physics which describes nature at the smallest scales of energy levels of atoms and subatomic particles.[2] Classical physics
Classical physics
(the physics existing before quantum mechanics) is a set of fundamental theories which describes nature at ordinary (macroscopic) scale
[...More...]

"Quantum Mechanics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Iron–sulfur World Theory
The iron–sulfur world hypothesis is a set of proposals for the origin of life and the early evolution of life advanced in a series of articles between 1988 and 1992 by Günter Wächtershäuser, a Munich patent lawyer with a degree in chemistry, who had been encouraged and supported by philosopher Karl R. Popper
Karl R. Popper
to publish his ideas
[...More...]

"Iron–sulfur World Theory" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Fellow Of The British Academy
Fellowship of the British Academy
British Academy
(FBA) is an award granted by the British Academy
British Academy
to leading academics for their distinction[1] in the humanities and social sciences.[2] There are three kinds of fellowship[3]Fellows, for scholars resident in the United Kingdom Corresponding Fellows, for scholars not resident in the UK Honorary Fellows, an honorary academic titleThe award of fellowship is evidenced by published work and fellows may use the post-nominal letters: FBA. Examples of fellows include Mary Beard, Nicholas Stern, Baron Stern of Brentford
Nicholas Stern, Baron Stern of Brentford
and Rowan Williams. See also[edit]List of Fellows of the British AcademyReferences[edit]^ "The British Academy
British Academy
welcomes new Fellows for 2015 University of Cambridge". Cam.ac.uk. 2015-07-16. Retrieved 2016-12-10.  ^ "Fellows British Academy"
[...More...]

"Fellow Of The British Academy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Logic
Logic
Logic
(from the Ancient Greek: λογική, translit. logikḗ[1]), originally meaning "the word" or "what is spoken", but coming to mean "thought" or "reason", is a subject concerned with the most general laws of truth,[2] and is now generally held to consist of the systematic study of the form of valid inference. A valid inference is one where there is a specific relation of logical support between the assumptions of the inference and its conclusion. (In ordinary discourse, inferences may be signified by words like therefore, hence, ergo, and so on.) There is no universal agreement as to the exact scope and subject matter of logic (see § Rival conceptions, below), but it has traditionally included the classification of arguments, the systematic exposition of the 'logical form' common to all valid arguments, the study of inference, including fallacies, and the study of semantics, including paradoxes
[...More...]

"Logic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Rationality
Rationality is the quality or state of being rational – that is, being based on or agreeable to reason.[1][2] Rationality implies the conformity of one's beliefs with one's reasons to believe, and of one's actions with one's reasons for action. "Rationality" has different specialized meanings in philosophy,[3] economics, sociology, psychology, evolutionary biology, game theory and political science. To determine what behavior is the most rational, one needs to make several key assumptions, and also needs a quantifiable formulation[dubious – discuss] of the problem. When the goal or problem involves making a decision, rationality factors in all information that is available (e.g. complete or incomplete knowledge). Collectively, the formulation and background assumptions are the model within which rationality applies
[...More...]

"Rationality" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Doctoral Advisor
A doctoral advisor (also dissertation director or dissertation advisor) is a member of a university faculty whose role is to guide graduate students who are candidates for a doctorate, helping them select coursework, as well as shaping, refining and directing the students' choice of sub-discipline in which they will be examined or on which they will write a dissertation.[1] Students generally choose advisors based on their areas of interest within their discipline, their desire to work closely with particular graduate faculty, and the willingness and availability of those faculty to work with them. In some countries, the student's advisor serves as the chair of the doctoral examination or dissertation committees. In some cases, though, the person who serves those roles may be different from the faculty member who has most closely advised the student
[...More...]

"Doctoral Advisor" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Thesis
A thesis or dissertation[1] is a document submitted in support of candidature for an academic degree or professional qualification presenting the author's research and findings.[2] In some contexts, the word "thesis" or a cognate is used for part of a bachelor's or master's course, while "dissertation" is normally applied to a doctorate, while in other contexts, the reverse is true.[3] The term graduate thesis is sometimes used to refer to both master's theses and doctoral dissertations.[4] The required complexity or quality of research of a thesis or dissertation can vary by country, university, or program, and the required minimum study period may thus vary significantly in duration. The word "dissertation" can at times be used to describe a treatise without relation to obtaining an academic degree
[...More...]

"Thesis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Lycophron (Sophist)
Lycophron (/ˈlaɪkəfrɒn/; Greek: Λυκόφρων) was a sophist of Ancient Greece. The central point about Lycrophron as attacked in the Politics of Aristotle, is that Lycrophron rejected the idea that the state exists to make people "just and good", instead holding the view that justice and law is about preventing people violating the bodies and goods of each other. This is the only reference to Lycrophron in the Politics. The details of his life remain obscure, other than a number of references in the works of Aristotle
[...More...]

"Lycophron (Sophist)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

England
England
England
is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.[6][7][8] It shares land borders with Scotland
Scotland
to the north and Wales
Wales
to the west. The Irish Sea
Irish Sea
lies northwest of England
England
and the Celtic Sea
Celtic Sea
lies to the southwest. England
England
is separated from continental Europe
Europe
by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel
English Channel
to the south
[...More...]

"England" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Austria-Hungary
Austria-Hungary, often referred to as the Austro-Hungarian Empire
Empire
or the Dual Monarchy
Dual Monarchy
in English-language sources, was a constitutional union of the Austrian Empire
Austrian Empire
(the Kingdoms and Lands Represented in the Imperial Council, or Cisleithania) and the Kingdom of Hungary ( Lands of the Crown of Saint Stephen
Lands of the Crown of Saint Stephen
or Transleithania) that existed from 1867 to 1918, when it collapsed as a result of defeat in World War I. The union was a result of the Austro-Hungarian Compromise of 1867 and came into existence on 30 March 1867
[...More...]

"Austria-Hungary" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

London
London
London
(/ˈlʌndən/ ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of England
England
and the United Kingdom.[7][8] Standing on the River Thames
River Thames
in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium.[9] London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries
[...More...]

"London" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.