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Kabumpo
Kabumpo, the Elegant Elephant
Elephant
of Pumperdink, is a fictional character in the Oz books of Ruth Plumly Thompson.[1] Kabumpo
Kabumpo
first appears in Kabumpo
Kabumpo
in Oz, Thompson's second Oz book. He was originally a christening gift to the king of Pumperdink, Pompus. He reappears to play major roles in The Lost King of Oz, The Purple Prince of Oz, and The Silver Princess in Oz. Thompson's illustrator John R. Neill
John R. Neill
made Kabumpo
Kabumpo
a denizen of the Emerald City, attended by Ojo, in his contributions to the series. In 1980 Eloise Jarvis McGraw and Lauren Lynn McGraw borrowed the character for The Forbidden Fountain of Oz, published by the International Wizard of Oz Club. Kabumpo
Kabumpo
is known for his wisdom in Pumperdink, but that might be because he shines in comparison with other members of the court
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The Wishing Horse Of Oz
at least 48 publishedThe horse (Equus ferus caballus)[2][3] is one of two extant subspecies of Equus ferus. It is an odd-toed ungulate mammal belonging to the taxonomic family Equidae. The horse has evolved over the past 45 to 55 million years from a small multi-toed creature, Eohippus, into the large, single-toed animal of today. Humans began to domesticate horses around 4000 BC, and their domestication is believed to have been widespread by 3000 BC. Horses in the subspecies caballus are domesticated, although some domesticated populations live in the wild as feral horses. These feral populations are not true wild horses, as this term is used to describe horses that have never been domesticated, such as the endangered Przewalski's horse, a separate subspecies, and the only remaining true wild horse
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Elephant
Elephants are large mammals of the family Elephantidae
Elephantidae
and the order Proboscidea. Three species are currently recognised: the African bush elephant ( Loxodonta
Loxodonta
africana), the African forest elephant
African forest elephant
(L. cyclotis), and the Asian elephant
Asian elephant
( Elephas
Elephas
maximus). Elephants are scattered throughout sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia, and Southeast Asia
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Infant Baptism
Infant baptism[1][2] is the practice of baptising infants or young children. In theological discussions, the practice is sometimes referred to as paedobaptism, or pedobaptism, from the Greek pais meaning "child". This can be contrasted with what is called "believer's baptism", or credobaptism, from the Latin word credo meaning "I believe", which is the religious practice of baptising only individuals who personally confess faith in Jesus, therefore excluding underage children
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Ojo In Oz
Ojo in Oz
Ojo in Oz
(1933) is the twenty-seventh in the series of Oz books created by L. Frank Baum
L. Frank Baum
and his successors, and the thirteenth written by Ruth Plumly Thompson. It was illustrated by John R. Neill. Ojo (from The Patchwork Girl
Patchwork Girl
of Oz) is captured by Gypsies who plan to turn him over to a mysterious enemy who has offered to pay a large reward to anyone who captures and delivers Ojo to his stronghold at Moojer Mountain. Ojo befriends the gypsies' captive dancing bear Snufferbux (whose full name is Snuffurious, Buxorious, Blundurious Boroso). The gypsies are in turn captured by Realbad, the leader of a gang of bandits, who carries a secret that is connected to the Munchkin
Munchkin
boy and his habitually closemouthed guardian Unc Nunkie.[1] Realbad learns about the reward and resolves to collect it himself by delivering Ojo to Moojer Mountain
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The Magic Of Oz
The Magic of Oz: A Faithful Record of the Remarkable Adventures of Dorothy and Trot and the Wizard of Oz, Together with the Cowardly Lion, the Hungry Tiger
Hungry Tiger
and Cap'n Bill, in Their Successful Search for a Magical and Beautiful Birthday Present for Princess Ozma
Princess Ozma
of Oz is the thirteenth Land of Oz
Land of Oz
book written by L. Frank Baum
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Glinda Of Oz
Glinda of Oz
Glinda of Oz
is the fourteenth Land of Oz
Land of Oz
book written by children's author L. Frank Baum, published on July 10, 1920. It is the last book of the original Oz series, which was later continued by other authors. Like most of the Oz books, the plot features a journey through some of the remoter regions of Oz; though in this case the pattern is doubled: Dorothy and Ozma travel to stop a war between the Flatheads and Skeezers; then Glinda and a cohort of Dorothy's friends set out to rescue them. The book was dedicated to Baum's second son, Robert Stanton Baum.Contents1 Plot 2 Original manuscript 3 Film adaptation 4 References 5 External linksPlot[edit] Princess Ozma
Princess Ozma
and Dorothy travel to an obscure corner of the Land of Oz, in order to prevent a war between two local powers, the Skeezers and the Flatheads
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Grampa In Oz
Grampa in Oz
Grampa in Oz
(1924) is the eighteenth in the series of Oz books created by L. Frank Baum
L. Frank Baum
and his successors, and the fourth written by Ruth Plumly Thompson. Plot[edit] Things are going from bad to worse in the dilapidated kingdom of Ragbad; even the rag crop is failing. To top it all off (or not), King Fumbo's head is blown away in a ferocious storm (with "ten thousand pounds of thunder"). Prince Tatters of Ragbad, and Grampa, a former soldier and the bravest man in the kingdom (population 27), set out on a three-fold quest: for King Fumbo's lost head, a fortune to save the bankrupt kingdom, and a princess for Tatters to marry
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The Hungry Tiger Of Oz
The Hungry Tiger
Hungry Tiger
of Oz (1926) is the twentieth in the series of Oz books created by L. Frank Baum
L. Frank Baum
and his successors, and the sixth written by Ruth Plumly Thompson. It was Illustrated by John R. Neill.Contents1 Plot summary 2 Promotion 3 References 4 External linksPlot summary[edit] Thompson begins with a usurping tyrant, Irasha the Rough, the Pasha of Rash, a tiny kingdom in the southwest of Ev. The Pasha has a problem: his prison is too full to cram any more Rashers in. His Vizier's solution is to obtain a ferocious animal from nearby Oz to devour the luckless prisoners. Travelling to the Emerald City by his magical "hurry cane", the Vizier lures the Hungry Tiger
Hungry Tiger
(first seen in Ozma of Oz) to Rash
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The Giant Horse Of Oz
The Giant Horse of Oz
The Giant Horse of Oz
(1928) is the twenty-second in the series of Oz books created by L. Frank Baum
L. Frank Baum
and his successors, and the eighth written by Ruth Plumly Thompson. It was Illustrated by John R. Neill. The plot[edit] The tiny kingdom of the Ozure Isles, perched on five islands in Lake Orizon, surrounded by high mountains in a remote region of Munchkin Land, has little contact with the outside world—of Oz. The evil witch Mombi has turned her malice in the Ozure direction. After kidnapping Queen Orin, Mombi has left a fire-breathing lake monster named Quiberon in Lake Orizon to keep the natives prisoner.[1] Even after Mombi was vanquished, Quiberon remains. Conditions grow worse when Quiberon orders the Ozurites to kidnap a mortal maiden to keep him company
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Jack Pumpkinhead Of Oz
Jack Pumpkinhead of Oz (1929) is the twenty-third of the series of Oz books created by L. Frank Baum and continued by other writers; it is the ninth Oz book written by Ruth Plumly Thompson. It was Illustrated by John R. Neill. Synopsis[edit] A rainy day in Philadelphia means no baseball; Peter Brown,[1] the child protagonist introduced by Thompson in The Gnome King of Oz, mopes in his attic. He finds the sacks that were full of gold when he brought them back from his previous Oz adventure; and one of those sacks contains an odd gold coin. Toying with the coin and thinking of Oz, he wishes himself back in the magic land — and suddenly finds himself there, in the front yard of Jack Pumpkinhead.[2] The sensible thing for Peter to do is to head for the Emerald City; and Jack is ready to act as his guide
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The Yellow Knight Of Oz
The Yellow Knight of Oz (1930) is the twenty-fourth in the series of Oz books created by L. Frank Baum and his successors, and the tenth written by Ruth Plumly Thompson. It was illustrated by John R. Neill. Sir Hokus of Pokes grows tired of the Emerald City, and he and the Comfortable Camel set out for some adventure. Sir Hokes wants to rescue a damsel in distress, or at least find a monster to fight. Sir Hokus visits Marshland and befriends Ploppa, a giant mud turtle. Ploppa would like to accompany Sir Hokus on his adventures, but cannot leave the swamp. Sir Hokus is joined by the Comfortable Camel. Meanwhile, a boy named Speedy blasts his way to Oz in a homemade rocket ship, where he finds himself in the underground kingdom of Subterranea. At his touch, a golden statue of a beautiful girl comes to life. She is called Marygolden, and she accompanies Speedy on his further adventures
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Pirates In Oz
Pirates in Oz (1931) is the twenty-fifth in the series of Oz books created by L. Frank Baum and his successors, and the eleventh written by Ruth Plumly Thompson. It was illustrated by John R. Neill. Plot[edit] Peter returns for a third time, washing up on the Octagon Isle after a shipwreck. He joins King Ato of the Octagon Isle, who has been abandoned by his subjects, and Captain Samuel Salt, who has been abandoned by his crew of pirates. Together, they sail on the Nonestic Ocean (which surrounds the continent which includes Oz and its neighbor countries). Meanwhile, Ruggedo, the deposed Gnome King, is back.[1] He had been cursed with loss of speech by a magical "Silence Stone" at the end of his previous appearance in The Gnome King of Oz, and is scraping out a living as a peddler and beggar. He decides to answer an advertisement for the position of King of the Land of Menankypoo, whose people are also mute. These people demand "a dumb king" and Ruggedo meets this requirement
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John R. Neill
John Rea Neill (November 12, 1877 - September 19, 1943) was a magazine and children's book illustrator primarily known for illustrating more than forty stories set in the Land of Oz, including L. Frank Baum's, Ruth Plumly Thompson's, and three of his own.[1] His pen-and-ink drawings have become identified almost exclusively with the Oz series. He did a great deal of magazine and newspaper illustration work which is not as well known today.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Dorothy 4 Oz work 5 Non-Oz work 6 References 7 External linksEarly life[edit] Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, John R. Neill
John R. Neill
did his first illustration work for the Philadelphia's Central High School newspaper in 1894-95. Neill dropped out of Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts after one semester because he said, "they have nothing to teach me".[2] He then turned to advertising art for the Wanamaker department store in Philadelphia
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Speedy In Oz
Speedy in Oz
Speedy in Oz
(1934) is the twenty-eighth in the series of Oz books created by L. Frank Baum
L. Frank Baum
and his successors, and the fourteenth written by Ruth Plumly Thompson. It was Illustrated by John R. Neill. This book features yet another island which floats in the sky: Umbrella Island, which flies by virtue of a huge umbrella with lifting and shielding powers. The king is not very good at steering the flying island; he bumps it into a giant's head. For compensation, Loxo, the great brute, demands the King's daughter Gureeda, whom he mistakes for a boy, as a servant to lace his huge boots. However, he grants the Umbrella Islanders three months to train the child to be a bootlacer. Meanwhile, the boy Speedy (from The Yellow Knight of Oz) returns for another adventure. While inspecting a dinosaur skeleton, Speedy is blown by a geyser into the air
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The Lost Princess Of Oz
The Lost Princess of Oz
The Lost Princess of Oz
is the eleventh canonical Oz book written by L. Frank Baum. Published on June 5, 1917, it begins with the disappearance of Princess Ozma, the ruler of Oz and covers Dorothy and the Wizard's efforts to find her. The introduction to the book states that its inspiration was a letter a little girl had written to Baum: "I suppose if Ozma ever got hurt or losted, everybody would be sorry." The book was dedicated to the author's newborn granddaughter Ozma Baum, child of his youngest son Kenneth Gage Baum. Ruth Plumly Thompson
Ruth Plumly Thompson
borrowed the plot of this novel for her 1937 Oz book Handy Mandy in Oz. The Frogman and Cayke's dishpan re-appear in Jeff Freedman's 1994 novel The Magic Dishpan of Oz. Plot summary[edit] Dorothy has risen from bed for the day and is seeing to her friends in the Emerald City and notices that Ozma has not awakened yet
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