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Kabbad
The Kabbad
Kabbad
refers to a citron-like fruit or citrus hybrid which was first described in 1963 by the Moroccan professor Henri Chapot, in his article named "Le Cédrat Kabbad
Kabbad
et deux autres variétés de cédrat", who remarked it to be a biological hybrid between the citron and the orange sourcing from Damaskus, Syria.[1] Citron
Citron
varietiesAcidic-pulp varietiesBalady citron Diamante citron Greek citronNon-acidic varietiesCorsican citron Moroccan citronPulpless varietiesFingered citron Yemenite citron Citron
Citron
HybridsFlorentine citron Kabbad Lumia Ponderosa lemon Rhobs el ArsaRelated articles Citrus
Citrus
taxonomy Etrog Succade Sukkotv t eFollowing is from The Citrus
Citrus
Industry vol. 1 Chap.4:“ Fruits Resembling the Citron. — There are numerous fruits in which citron characters are strongly pronounced
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Coorg
Kodagu is an administrative district in Karnataka, India. Before 1956 it was an administratively separate Coorg
Coorg
State,[3] at which point it was merged into an enlarged Mysore
Mysore
State. It occupies an area of 4,102 square kilometres (1,584 sq mi) in the Western Ghats
Western Ghats
of southwestern Karnataka
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Cultivar
The term cultivar[nb 1] most commonly refers to an assemblage of plants selected for desirable characters that are maintained during propagation. More generally, cultivar refers to the most basic classification category of cultivated plants in the International Code of Nomenclature for Cultivated Plants (ICNCP). Most cultivars arose in cultivation, but a few are special selections from the wild. Popular ornamental garden plants like roses, camellias, daffodils, rhododendrons, and azaleas are cultivars produced by careful breeding and selection for floral colour and form. Similarly, the world's agricultural food crops are almost exclusively cultivars that have been selected for characters such as improved yield, flavour, and resistance to disease, and very few wild plants are now used as food sources
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Damascus
Damascus
Damascus
(/dəˈmæskəs/; Arabic: دمشق‎ Dimashq [diˈmaʃq], Syrian: [dˈməʃe(ː)ʔ]) is the capital of the Syrian Arab Republic; it is likely also the country's largest city, following the decline in population of Aleppo
Aleppo
due to the battle for the city. It is commonly known in Syria
Syria
as ash-Sham (Arabic: الشام‎ ash-Shām) and nicknamed as the City of Jasmine
Jasmine
(Arabic: مدينة الياسمين‎ Madīnat al-Yāsmīn). In addition to being one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the world,[4] Damascus
Damascus
is a major cultural centre of the Levant
Levant
and the Arab world
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Sukkot
Sukkot
Sukkot
(Hebrew: סוכות‎ or סֻכּוֹת, sukkōt, commonly translated as Feast of Tabernacles or Feast of the Ingathering, traditional Ashkenazi
Ashkenazi
pronunciation Sukkos or Succos, literally Feast of Booths) is a biblical Jewish holiday
Jewish holiday
celebrated on the 15th day of the seventh month, Tishrei
Tishrei
(varies from late September to late October). During the existence of the Jerusalem
Jerusalem
Temple, it was one of the Three Pilgrimage Festivals (Hebrew: שלוש רגלים‎, shalosh regalim) on which the Israelites
Israelites
were commanded to perform a pilgrimage to the Temple. Sukkot
Sukkot
has a double significance
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Citrus Micrantha
Citrus
Citrus
westeri Tanaka[2] Citrus
Citrus
micrantha is a species of wild citrus from the papeda group, native to southern Philippines, particularly islands of Cebu
Cebu
and Bohol. Two varieties are recognized: small-flowered papeda (C. micrantha var. micrantha), locally known as biasong, and small-fruited papeda (C. micrantha var
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Hybrid (biology)
In biology, a hybrid, or crossbreed, is the result of combining the qualities of two organisms of different breeds, varieties, species or genera through sexual reproduction. Hybrids are not always intermediates between their parents (such as in blending inheritance), but can show hybrid vigour, often growing larger or taller than either parent. The concept of a hybrid is interpreted differently in animal and plant breeding, where there is interest in the individual parentage. In genetics, attention is focused on the numbers of chromosomes. In taxonomy, a key question is how closely related the parent species are. Species
Species
are reproductively isolated by strong barriers to hybridisation, which include morphological differences, differing times of fertility, mating behaviors and cues, and physiological rejection of sperm cells or the developing embryo. Some act before fertilization and others after it
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Acid
An acid is a molecule or ion capable of donating a hydron (proton or hydrogen ion H+), or, alternatively, capable of forming a covalent bond with an electron pair (a Lewis acid).[1] The first category of acids is the proton donors or Brønsted acids. In the special case of aqueous solutions, proton donors form the hydronium ion H3O+ and are known as Arrhenius acids. Brønsted and Lowry generalized the Arrhenius theory to include non-aqueous solvents. A Brønsted or Arrhenius acid usually contains a hydrogen atom bonded to a chemical structure that is still energetically favorable after loss of H+. Aqueous Arrhenius acids have characteristic properties which provide a practical description of an acid.[2] Acids form aqueous solutions with a sour taste, can turn blue litmus red, and react with bases and certain metals (like calcium) to form salts
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Variety (botany)
In botanical nomenclature, variety (abbreviated var.; in Latin: varietas) is a taxonomic rank below that of species and subspecies but above that of form.[1] As such, it gets a three-part infraspecific name. It is sometimes recommended that the subspecies rank should be used to recognize geographic distinctiveness, whereas the variety rank is appropriate if the taxon is seen throughout the geographic range of the species.[2]Contents1 Example 2 Definitions 3 Other nomenclature uses 4 See also 5 References 6 BibliographyExample[edit] The pincushion cactus, Escobaria vivipara
Escobaria vivipara
(Nutt.) Buxb., is a wide-ranging variable species occurring from Canada
Canada
to Mexico, and found throughout New Mexico
Mexico
below about 2,600 metres (8,500 ft). Nine varieties have been described. Where the varieties of the pincushion cactus meet, they intergrade. The variety Escobaria vivipara var
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Damaskus
Damascus (/dəˈmæskəs/; Arabic: دمشق‎ Dimashq [diˈmaʃq], Syrian: [dˈməʃe(ː)ʔ]) is the capital of the Syrian Arab Republic; it is likely also the country's largest city, following the decline in population of Aleppo due to the battle for the city. It is colloquially known in Syria as ash-Sham (Arabic: الشام‎ ash-Shām) and titled the City of Jasmine (Arabic: مدينة الياسمين‎ Madīnat al-Yāsmīn). In addition to being one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the world,[4] Damascus is a major cultural centre of the Levant and the Arab world
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Syria
Coordinates: 35°N 38°E / 35°N 38°E / 35; 38Syrian Arab
Arab
Republic الجمهورية العربية السورية (Arabic) al-Jumhūrīyah al-ʻArabīyah as-SūrīyahFlagCoat of armsAnthem: "حماة الديار" (Arabic) Humat ad-Diyar Guardians of the HomelandCapital and largest city Damascus 33°30′N 36°18′E / 33.500°N 36.300°E / 33.500; 36.300Official languages ArabicEthnic groupsSyrian Arabs Arameans Kurds Turkomans Assyrians Circassians ArmeniansReligion 87% Islam 10% Christianity 3% Druzism[1]Government Unitary domina
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Species
In biology, a species is the basic unit of classification and a taxonomic rank, as well as a unit of biodiversity, but it has proven difficult to find a satisfactory definition. Scientists and conservationists need a species definition which allows them to work, regardless of the theoretical difficulties. If as Linnaeus
Linnaeus
thought, species were fixed, there would be no problem, but evolutionary processes cause species to change continually, and to grade into one another. A species is often defined as the largest group of organisms in which two individuals can produce fertile offspring, typically by sexual reproduction. While this definition is often adequate, when looked at more closely it is problematic. For example, with hybridisation, in a species complex of hundreds of similar microspecies, or in a ring species, the boundaries between closely related species become unclear
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Amanatsu
Amanatsu
Amanatsu
(甘夏) or natsumikan (ナツミカン(夏蜜柑)) is a yellowish orange citrus hybrid fruit, a group of cultivars of Citrus natsudaidai, which were discovered in 1740 in the Yamaguchi prefecture of Japan.Contents1 Names 2 Description 3 Cultivation 4 Genetics 5 Medicine 6 Gallery 7 See also 8 References 9 Further readingNames[edit] In Japan, it is officially known as the kawano natsu daidai (カワノナツダイダイ(川野夏橙)), but also colloquially the amanatsu, amanatsu daidai (甘夏橙), amanatsukan (甘夏柑), and amanatsu mikan (甘夏蜜柑(甘夏みかん)). Description[edit] Natsumikan is about the size of grapefruit and oblate in shape. The fruit contains 12 segments and about 30 seeds. The rough textured fruit is easy to peel and is commonly eaten fresh
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Mangshanyegan
The Mangshanyegan (Chinese: 莽山野桔; Citrus
Citrus
mangshanensis, also known incorrectly as the 'Mangshan mandarin') is a wild citrus fruit species. The mangshanyegan is native to mountain forests in Mangshan, Hunan province, China, where it was first reported in the 1980s.[2] It is morphologically similar to cultivated Mandarin oranges, but genetically distinct.[1] Genomic sequencing shows the mangshanyegan to be one of a small number of pure (non-hybrid) citrus species, having diverged from other members of the genus at the initial branching of Citrus
Citrus
radiation in the Late Miocene.[3] Citrus
Citrus
crops are often propagated asexually, so they have low genetic diversity.[4] The mangshanyegan is thus potentially important as a source of diversity for citrus breeders. References[edit]^ a b Wu, GA; et al. (2014)
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Citrus Indica
Citrus
Citrus
indica is a species of Citrus
Citrus
known by the common name Indian wild orange.[1][2] It is native to India.Contents1 Taxonomy 2 Uses 3 Conservation status 4 ReferencesTaxonomy[edit] Main article: Citrus
Citrus
taxonomy This wild orange plant is likely one of the ancestors of today's cultivated citrus fruits, if not the main one.[2] It is considered to be the most "primitive" citrus.[3] It can be used as a citrus rootstock for cultivated citrus.[3] Recent searches of the plant's reported home range confirmed its presence only in Meghalaya, where it grows in the Garo Hills.[2] Uses[edit] This species is used for medicinal and spiritual purposes by the Garo people. The fruit is used to treat jaundice and stomach conditions in humans and animals, and it was used to treat smallpox
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Citrus Ichangensis
Citrus
Citrus
ichangensis, the Ichang papeda (Chinese: 宜昌橙), is a slow-growing species of papeda that has characteristic lemon-scented foliage and flowers. It is native to southwestern and west-central China[1] and is likely named for the city of Yichang
Yichang
(宜昌), in China's Hubei
Hubei
province. It is sometimes referred to as Citrus
Citrus
× ichangensis. The Ichang papeda's main claim to fame is its unusual hardiness. With the exception of Poncirus trifoliata, it is the hardiest citrus plant, tolerating both moderate frost and damp conditions.[2] For this reason, it is perhaps the only species of true citrus which can be reliably grown outside in the temperate areas of Europe and the United States. Description[edit] Relatively rare in cultivation, the Ichang papeda is a large shrub or small tree, growing to 3-4.5 m,[3] and produces a small, mandarin-like fruit
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