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Julius Caesar (play)
The ghost of Caesar
Caesar
taunts Brutus about his imminent defeat. ( Copperplate engraving
Copperplate engraving
by Edward Scriven from a painting by Richard Westall: London, 1802.)The Tragedy of Julius Caesar
Julius Caesar
is a history play and tragedy by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written in 1599
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Copperplate Engraving
Intaglio (/ɪnˈtæli.oʊ/ in-TAL-ee-oh; Italian: [inˈtaʎʎo]) is the family of printing and printmaking techniques in which the image is incised into a surface and the incised line or sunken area holds the ink.[1] It is the direct opposite of a relief print. Normally, copper or zinc plates are used as a surface or matrix, and the incisions are created by etching, engraving, drypoint, aquatint or mezzotint.[2] Collagraphs may also be printed as intaglio plates.[3]Contents1 Process 2 Brief history 3 Current use 4 Famous intaglio artists 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksProcess[edit] In intaglio printing, the lines to be printed are cut into a metal plate by means either of a cutting tool called a burin, held in the hand – in which case the process is called engraving; or through the corrosive action of acid – in which case the process is known as etching.[4] In etching, for example, the plate is covered in a resin ground or an acid-resistant wax material
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Poet
A poet is a person who creates poetry. Poets may describe themselves as such or be described as such by others. A poet may simply be a writer of poetry, or may perform their art to an audience.Postmortal fictional portrait of Slovak poet Janko Kráľ
Janko Kráľ
(1822-1876) - an idealized romanticized picture of "how a real poet should look" in Western culture.The Italian Giacomo Leopardi
Giacomo Leopardi
was mentioned by the University of Birmingham as "one of the most radical and challenging of nineteenth-century thinkers".[1]The work of a poet is essentially one of communication, either expressing ideas in a literal sense, such as writing about a specific event or place, or metaphorically
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Gaius Popillius Laenas
Gaius Popillius Laenas (the alternative spellings Popilius and Laena are fairly common) twice served as one of the two consuls of the Roman Republic, in 172 and 158 BC. His name indicates he was of the gens Popilia; the Latin plural of Laenas is Laenates. He was sent as an envoy to prevent a war between Antiochus IV Epiphanes of the Seleucid Empire
Seleucid Empire
and Ptolemaic Egypt. On being confronted with the Roman demands that he abort his attack on Alexandria, Antiochus played for time; Popillius Laenas is supposed to have drawn a circle around the king in the sand with his cane, and ordered him not to move out of it until a firm answer had been given. The Syrians withdrew
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Oracle
In classical antiquity, an oracle was a person or agency considered to provide wise and insightful counsel or prophetic predictions or precognition of the future, inspired by the god. As such it is a form of divination.Contents1 Description 2 Origins 3 Pythia
Pythia
(Delphi) 4 Dodona 5 Trophonius 6 Oracle
Oracle
of Menestheus 7 "Oracles" in other cultures7.1 China 7.2 Celtic polytheism 7.3 Hinduism 7.4 Tibetan Buddhism 7.5 Pre-Columbian Americas 7.6 Nigeria 7.7 Norse mythology 7.8 Hawaii8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksDescription[edit] The word oracle comes from the Latin
Latin
verb ōrāre, "to speak" and properly refers to the priest or priestess uttering the prediction
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Artemidorus
Artemidorus Daldianus (Greek: Ἀρτεμίδωρος ὁ Δαλδιανός) or Ephesius was a professional diviner who lived in the 2nd century CE. He is known from an extant five-volume Greek work, the Oneirocritica or Oneirokritikon (English: The Interpretation of Dreams).[1]Contents1 Life and work 2 Editions and translations 3 References 4 External linksLife and work[edit] Artemidorus was surnamed Ephesius, from Ephesus, on the west coast of Asia Minor, but was also called Daldianus, from his mother's native city, Daldis in Lycia. He lived in the 2nd century AD. According to Artemidorus, the material for his work was gathered during lengthy travels through Greece, Italy and Asia, from diviners of high and low station. Another major source were the writings of Artemidorus' predecessors, sixteen of whom he cites by name
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Sophist
A sophist (Greek: σοφιστής, sophistes) was a specific kind of teacher in ancient Greece, in the fifth and fourth centuries BC. Many sophists specialized in using the tools of philosophy and rhetoric, though other sophists taught subjects such as music, athletics, and mathematics. In general, they claimed to teach arete ("excellence" or "virtue", applied to various subject areas), predominantly to young statesmen and nobility. The term originated from Greek σόφισμα, sophisma, from σοφίζω, sophizo "I am wise"; confer σοφιστής, sophistēs, meaning "wise-ist, one who does wisdom," and σοφός, sophós means "wise man". There are not many writings from and about the first sophists
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Shoemaking
Shoemaking
Shoemaking
is the process of making footwear. Originally, shoes were made one at a time by hand. Traditional handicraft shoemaking has now been largely superseded in volume of shoes produced by industrial mass production of footwear, but not necessarily in quality, attention to detail, or craftsmanship. Shoemakers (also known as cordwainers) may produce a range of footwear items, including shoes, boots, sandals, clogs and moccasins. Such items are generally made of leather, wood, rubber, plastic, jute or other plant material, and often consist of multiple parts for better durability of the sole, stitched to a leather upper Trades that engage in shoemaking have included the cordwainer's and cobbler's trades
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Carpenter
Carpentry
Carpentry
is a skilled trade in which the primary work performed is the cutting, shaping and installation of building materials during the construction of buildings, ships, timber bridges, concrete formwork, etc. Carpenters traditionally worked with natural wood and did the rougher work such as framing, but today many other materials are also used[1] and sometimes the finer trades of cabinetmaking and furniture building are considered carpentry. Carpentry
Carpentry
in the United States
United States
is almost always done by men
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Marcus Porcius Cato (son Of Cato The Younger)
Marcus Porcius Cato (c. 73-42 BC), son of Cato the Younger
Cato the Younger
by his first marriage to Atilia, was a Roman soldier and in his earlier years spent some time in politics with his father. Although he never achieved greatness, he was admired by close friends and relatives, and also served his father most loyally and shared his ideals. Marcus was renowned for being a man of gallantry and warm temperament.Contents1 Biography 2 Family2.1 Family tree3 NotesBiography[edit] He was the brother of Porcia Catonis, who was first married to Marcus Calpurnius Bibulus (co-consul with Caesar in 59 BC); she later married their half-cousin (on the maternal side) Marcus Junius Brutus. Marcus fought in the Battle of Thapsus, and after being defeated by Caesar's forces his father Cato committed suicide in 46 BC
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Trebonius
Gaius Trebonius (c. 92 BC – January 43 BC) was a military commander and politician of the late Roman Republic, who became suffect consul in 45 BC. A trusted associate of Julius Caesar, he was later among those who instigated the plot to assassinate the dictator.Contents1 Early career 2 Caesar’s legate 3 Later career and plotting Caesar’s assassination 4 See also 5 Sources 6 ReferencesEarly career[edit] Born c
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Marcus Valerius Messalla Corvinus
Marcus Valerius Messalla Corvinus
Marcus Valerius Messalla Corvinus
(64 BC – 8 AD) was a Roman general, author and patron of literature and art.Contents1 Family 2 Life 3 Patronage and writings 4 Places associated with Corvinus 5 Legendary ancestor of Hungarian Royalty 6 References 7 See alsoFamily[edit] Corvinus was the son of the consul in 61 BC, Marcus Valerius Messalla Niger,[1] and his wife, Polla. Some dispute his parentage and claim another descendant of Marcus Valerius Corvus to be his father. Valeria, one of the sisters of Corvinus, married the Roman Politician Quintus Pedius[2] (a maternal cousin to the Roman emperor
Roman emperor
Augustus). His great-nephew from this marriage was the deaf painter Quintus Pedius. Corvinus married twice. His first wife was in Calpurnia, possibly the daughter of the Roman politician Marcus Calpurnius Bibulus
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Varrus
Publius Quinctilius Varus
Quinctilius Varus
(46 BC Cremona, Roman Republic
Roman Republic
– September 9 AD near Kalkriese, Germany) was a Roman general and politician under the first Roman emperor
Roman emperor
Augustus. Varus is generally remembered for having lost three Roman legions when ambushed by Germanic tribes
Germanic tribes
led by Arminius
Arminius
in the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest, whereupon he took his own life.Contents1 Background and early career 2 Marriages and children 3 Political career 4 Battle of the Teutoburg Forest
Battle of the Teutoburg Forest
and death 5 Aftermath 6 In Popular Culture6.1 In fiction7 References 8 Sources 9 External linksBackground and early career[edit] Varus was born into the gens Quinctilia
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Gaius Lucilius
Gaius Lucilius (c. 180 – 103/2 BC),[1] the earliest Roman satirist, of whose writings only fragments remain, was a Roman citizen of the equestrian class, born at Suessa Aurunca in Campania. He was a member of the Scipionic Circle.Contents1 Problem of his birthdate 2 Life and satire 3 References3.1 Editions of the fragments 3.2 Other ancient sources 3.3 Modern worksProblem of his birthdate[edit] The dates assigned by Jerome
Jerome
for his birth and death are 148 BC and 103 BC or 102 BC. But it is impossible to reconcile the first of these dates with other facts recorded of him, and the date given by Jerome
Jerome
must be due to an error, the true date being about 180 BC
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Pindarus
Pindar
Pindar
(/ˈpɪndər/; Greek: Πίνδαρος Pindaros, pronounced [píndaros]; Latin: Pindarus) (c. 522 – c. 443 BC) was an Ancient Greek lyric
Greek lyric
poet from Thebes. Of the canonical nine lyric poets of ancient Greece, his work is the best preserved. Quintilian
Quintilian
wrote, "Of the nine lyric poets, Pindar
Pindar
is by far the greatest, in virtue of his inspired magnificence, the beauty of his thoughts and figures, the rich exuberance of his language and matter, and his rolling flood of eloquence, characteristics which, as Horace rightly held, make him inimitable."[1] His poems can also, however, seem difficult and even peculiar
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Servant
A domestic worker, domestic helper or domestic servant, also called menial, is a person who works within the employer's household. Domestic helpers perform a variety of household services for an individual or a family, from providing care for children and elderly dependents to housekeeping, including cleaning and household maintenance. Other responsibilities may include cooking, laundry and ironing, shopping for food and other household errands. Such work has always needed to be done but before the Industrial Revolution
Industrial Revolution
and the advent of labour saving devices, it was physically much harder. Some domestic helpers live within their employer's household. In some cases, the contribution and skill of servants whose work encompassed complex management tasks in large households have been highly valued. However, for the most part, domestic work, while necessary, is demanding and undervalued
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