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Julian Jack
James Julian Bennett Jack FRS (born 25 March 1936) is a New Zealand physiologist.[3]Contents1 Education 2 Career 3 References 4 External linksEducation[edit] Jack graduated from the University of Otago.[1][4] Career[edit] Jack was a Rhodes Scholar
Rhodes Scholar
in 1960 to Magdalen College, Oxford.[5] Jack was Lecturer
Lecturer
and Reader at University Laboratory of Physiology at Oxford University.[6][7] References[edit]^ a b JACK, Prof. (James) Julian (Bennett). ukwhoswho.com. Who's Who. 2015 (online Oxford University
Oxford University
Press ed.). A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc.  (subscription required) ^ Häusser, Michael (1992). Intrinsic properties and sympatic inhibition of substantia nigra neurones (DPhil thesis). University of Oxford
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Invercargill
Invercargill
Invercargill
(Māori: Waihōpai)[2] is the southernmost and westernmost city in New Zealand, and one of the southernmost cities in the world. It is the commercial centre of the Southland region. It lies in the heart of the wide expanse of the Southland Plains
Southland Plains
on the Oreti or New River some 18 km north of Bluff, which is the southernmost town in the South Island
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Reader (academic Rank)
The title of reader in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and some universities in the Commonwealth of Nations, for example India, Australia
Australia
and New Zealand, denotes an appointment for a senior academic with a distinguished international reputation in research or scholarship. In India, the term used for a "reader" is "Associate Professor".Contents1 Overview1.1 Associate professor
Associate professor
in place of reader2 Comparison 3 Notable examples 4 ReferencesOverview[edit] In the traditional hierarchy of British and other Commonwealth universities, reader is an academic rank above senior lecturer (or principal lecturer in the new universities) and below professor, recognising a distinguished record of original research
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Denis Noble
Denis Noble
Denis Noble
CBE FRS FRCP FMedSci (born 16 November 1936) is a British biologist who held the Burdon Sanderson Chair of Cardiovascular Physiology
Physiology
at the University of Oxford
University of Oxford
from 1984 to 2004 and was appointed Professor Emeritus and co-Director of Computational Physiology. He is one of the pioneers of Systems Biology
Systems Biology
and developed the first viable mathematical model of the working heart in 1960.[4][5][6][7][8]Contents1 Education 2 Research2.1 Reductionism 2.2 Evolution 2.3 Principles of Systems Biology 2.4 Career 2.5 Publications3 Awards and honours 4 Personal life 5 ReferencesEducation[edit] Noble was educated at Emanuel School and University College London (UCL).[1][4] In 1958 he began his investigations into the mechanisms of heartbeat
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OCLC
OCLC, currently incorporated as OCLC
OCLC
Online Computer Library Center, Incorporated,[3] is an American nonprofit cooperative organization "dedicated to the public purposes of furthering access to the world's information and reducing information costs".[4] It was founded in 1967 as the Ohio College Library Center. OCLC
OCLC
and its member libraries cooperatively produce and maintain WorldCat, the largest online public access catalog (OPAC) in the world
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Paywall
A paywall is a method of restricting access to Internet content via a paid subscription.[1][2] Beginning in the mid-2010s, newspapers started implementing paywalls on their websites as a way to increase revenue after years of decline in paid print readership and advertising revenue.[3] In academics, research papers are often subject to a paywall and are available via academic libraries that subscribe.[4][5] Paywalls have also been used as a way of increasing the number of print subscribers; for example, some newspapers offer access to online content plus delivery of a Sunday print edition at a lower price than online access alone.[6] Newspaper websites such as that of The Boston Globe and The New York Times
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Oxford University Press
Oxford
Oxford
University Press (OUP) is the largest university press in the world,[1] and the second oldest after Cambridge University
Cambridge University
Press. It is a department of the University of Oxford
University of Oxford
and is governed by a group of 15 academics appointed by the vice-chancellor known as the delegates of the press. They are headed by the secretary to the delegates, who serves as OUP's chief executive and as its major representative on other university bodies
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Who's Who (UK)
Who's Who
Who's Who
is a leading source of biographical data on more than 33,000 influential people from around the world. Published annually since 1849, and as of 2015 in its 168th edition, it lists people who influence British life, according to its editors. Entries include judges, civil servants, politicians and notable figures from academia, sport and the arts. Each entry in Who's Who
Who's Who
is authored by the subject who is invited by the editors to fill in a questionnaire
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Oxford University
Coordinates: 51°45′40″N 1°15′12″W / 51.7611°N 1.2534°W / 51.7611; -1.2534University of OxfordCoat of armsLatin: Universitas OxoniensisMotto Dominus Illuminatio Mea (Latin)Motto in English"The Lord is my Light"Established c. 1096; 922 years ago (1096)[1]Endowment £5.069 billion (inc
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Lecturer
Lecturer
Lecturer
is an academic rank within many universities, though the meaning of the term varies somewhat from country to country. It generally denotes an academic expert without tenure who is hired to teach on a full- or part-time basis. They may also conduct research.Contents1 United Kingdom1.1 Historical use 1.2 Current uses 1.3 Tenure and permanent lectureships2 United States 3 Australia 4 India 5 Other countries 6 ReferencesUnited Kingdom[edit] Further information: Academic ranks in the United Kingdom In the UK, the term lecturer is ambiguous and covers several academic ranks. The key distinction is between permanent/open-ended or temporary/fixed-term lectureships. A permanent lecturer in UK universities usually holds an open-ended position that covers teaching, research, and administrative responsibilities
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University Of Otago
The University of Otago
Otago
(Māori: Te Whare Wānanga o Otāgo) is a collegiate university located in Dunedin, Otago, New Zealand. It scores highly for average research quality, and in 2006 was second in New Zealand only to the University of Auckland
University of Auckland
in the number of A-rated academic researchers it employs.[2] The university ranks highly in New Zealand's national league table; in the past it has topped the New Zealand Performance Based Research Fund evaluation.[3] The university was created by a committee led by Thomas Burns,[4] and officially established by an ordinance of the Otago
Otago
Provincial Council in 1869.[5] The university accepted its first students in July 1871, making it the oldest university in New Zealand and third-oldest in Oceania
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Magdalen College, Oxford
Magdalen College (/ˈmɔːdlɪn/ MAWD-lin)[2] is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford. Magdalen is one of the wealthiest colleges in Oxford, with an estimated financial endowment of £180.8 million as of 2014.[3] Magdalen stands next to the River Cherwell
River Cherwell
and has within its grounds a deer park and Addison's Walk
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Rhodes Scholar
The Rhodes Scholarship, named after the Anglo-South African mining magnate and politician Cecil John Rhodes, is an international postgraduate award for students to study at the University of Oxford.[1] It is widely considered to be one of the world's most prestigious scholarships.[2] Established in 1902, it was the first large-scale programme of international scholarships,[3] inspiring the creation of a great many other awards across the globe (such as the Fulbright
Fulbright
program, Marshall Scholarship, and the Gates Cambridge Scholarship). As elaborated on in his will, Cecil Rhodes' go
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Physiologist
Physiology
Physiology
(/ˌfɪziˈɒlədʒi/; from Ancient Greek φύσις (physis), meaning 'nature, origin', and -λογία (-logia), meaning 'study of'[1]) is the scientific study of normal mechanisms, and their interactions, which works within a living system.[2] A sub-discipline of biology, its focus is in how organisms, organ systems, organs, cells, and biomolecules carry out the chemical or physical functions that exist in a living system.[3] Given the size of the field,
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