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Julian Hawthorne
Julian Hawthorne
Julian Hawthorne
(June 22, 1846 – July 21, 1934) was an American writer and journalist, the son of novelist Nathaniel Hawthorne
Nathaniel Hawthorne
and Sophia Peabody. He wrote numerous poems, novels, short stories, mystery/detective fiction, essays, travel books, biographies, and histories. As a journalist, he reported on the Indian Famine for Cosmopolitan magazine and the Spanish–American War
Spanish–American War
for the New York Journal.Contents1 Biography1.1 Birth and childhood 1.2 Early career 1.3 Fraud and imprisonment2 Works 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksBiography[edit] Birth and childhood[edit] Julian Hawthorne
Julian Hawthorne
was the second child[1] of Nathaniel Hawthorne
Nathaniel Hawthorne
and Sophia Peabody Hawthorne
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Salem, Massachusetts
Salem is a historic, coastal city in Essex County, Massachusetts, in the United States, located on Massachusetts' North Shore. It is a New England bedrock of history and is considered one of the most significant seaports in Puritan
Puritan
American history. The city's reported population was 41,340 at the 2010 census.[2] Salem and Lawrence were the county seats of Essex County, though the county government was abolished in 1999.[3] The city is home to the House of the Seven Gables, Salem State University, Salem Willows
Salem Willows
Park, Pioneer Village, Salem Maritime National Historic Site, and the Peabody Essex Museum
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Time (magazine)
Time
Time
(styled TIME) is an American weekly news magazine and news website published in New York City. It was founded in 1923 and originally run by Henry Luce. A European edition ( Time
Time
Europe, formerly known as Time
Time
Atlantic) is published in London and also covers the Middle East, Africa and, since 2003, Latin America. An Asian edition ( Time
Time
Asia) is based in Hong Kong. The South Pacific edition, which covers Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific Islands, is based in Sydney
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Ontario
Ontario
Ontario
(/ɒnˈtɛərioʊ/ ( listen); French: [ɔ̃taʁjo]) is one of the 13 provinces and territories of Canada
Canada
and is located in east-central Canada.[7][8] It is Canada's most populous province[9] accounting for nearly 40 percent[10] of the country's population, and is the second-largest province in total area
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San Francisco, California
 CaliforniaCSA San Jose–San Francisco–OaklandMetro San Francisco–Oakland–HaywardMission June 29, 1776[1]Incorporated April 15, 1850[2]Founded by José Joaquín Moraga Francisco PalóuNamed for St
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Atlanta Federal Penitentiary
The United States Penitentiary, Atlanta
United States Penitentiary, Atlanta
(USP Atlanta) is a medium-security United States federal prison for male inmates in Atlanta, Georgia. It is operated by the Federal Bureau of Prisons, a division of the United States Department of Justice. The facility also has a detention center for pretrial and holdover inmates, and a satellite prison camp for minimum-security male inmates.[1]Contents1 History 2 Notable incidents2.1 1987 riots3 Notable inmates (current and former)3.1 Organized crime figures 3.2 Fraudsters 3.3 Political figures 3.4 Public officials 3.5 Others4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] In 1899, President William McKinley
William McKinley
authorized the construction of a new federal prison in Atlanta, Georgia.[2] Georgia Congressman Leonidas F. Livingston advocated placing the prison in Atlanta. William S. Eanes, an architect from St
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Brenda Wineapple
Brenda Wineapple is an American nonfiction writer, literary critic, and essayist. Her books include Ecstatic Nation: Confidence, Crisis, and Compromise, 1848–1877; White Heat: The Friendship of Emily Dickinson and Thomas Wentworth Higginson; Hawthorne: A Life; Sister Brother: Gertrude and Leo Stein; and Genêt: A Biography of Janet Flanner. A regular contributor to The New York Times Book Review, The Nation and other national publications, she is also the editor of The Selected Poetry of John Greenleaf Whittier (a volume in the Library of America's American Poets Project) and Nineteenth-Century American Writers on Writing (a volume in The Writers' World, ed
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The Chronicle Of Higher Education
The Chronicle of Higher Education
The Chronicle of Higher Education
is a newspaper and website that presents news, information, and jobs for college and university faculty and Student Affairs
Student Affairs
professionals (staff members and administrators). A subscription is required to read some articles.[5] The Chronicle, based in Washington, D.C., is a major news service in United States academic affairs. It is published every weekday online and appears weekly in print except for every other week in June, July, and August and the last three weeks in December (a total of 42 issues a year)
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Public Domain
The legal term public domain refers to works whose exclusive intellectual property rights have expired,[1] have been forfeited,[2] have been expressly waived, or are inapplicable.[3] For example, the works of Shakespeare
Shakespeare
and Beethoven, and most early silent films are in the public domain either by virtue of their having been created before copyright existed, or by their copyright term having expired.[1] Some works are not covered by copyright, and are therefore in the public domain—among them the formulae of Newtonian physics, cooking recipes,[4] and all computer software creat
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North American Review
North American Review
North American Review
(NAR) was the first literary magazine in the United States. It was founded in Boston
Boston
in 1815 by journalist Nathan Hale and others. It was published continuously until 1940, but was inactive from 1940 to 1964, until it was revived at Cornell College (Iowa) under Robert Dana. Since 1968 the University of Northern Iowa (Cedar Falls) has been home to the publication.[1] Nineteenth-century archives are freely available via Cornell University's Making of America.Contents1 History 2 Awards 3 Recent contributors 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksHistory[edit] NAR's first editor, William Tudor, and other founders had been members of Boston's Anthology Club, and launched North American Review
North American Review
to foster a genuine American culture
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Daniel Coit Gilman
Daniel Coit Gilman
Daniel Coit Gilman
(/ˈɡɪlmən/; July 6, 1831 – October 13, 1908) was an American educator and academic.[1] Gilman was instrumental in founding the Sheffield Scientific School
Sheffield Scientific School
at Yale College,[2] and subsequently served as the third president of the University of California, as the first president of Johns Hopkins University, and as founding president of the Carnegie Institution. He was also co-founder of the Russell Trust Association, which administers the business affairs of Yale's Skull and Bones
Skull and Bones
society
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New International Encyclopedia
The New International Encyclopedia
New International Encyclopedia
was an American encyclopedia first published in 1902 by Dodd, Mead and Company.[1] It descended from the International Cyclopaedia (1884) and was updated in 1906, 1914 and 1926.Contents1 History 2 Features 3 Contributors and office editors 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The New International Encyclopedia
New International Encyclopedia
was the successor of the International Cyclopaedia (1884). Initially, the International Cyclopaedia was largely a reprint of Alden's Library of Universal Knowledge, which was a reprint of the British Chambers's Encyclopaedia
Chambers's Encyclopaedia
with American additions (including many biographical entries for Americans). The local Cyclopaedia was much improved by editors Harry Thurston Peck and Selim Peabody
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Wikisource
Wikisource
Wikisource
is an online digital library of free content textual sources on a wiki, operated by the Wikimedia Foundation. Wikisource
Wikisource
is the name of the project as a whole and the name for each instance of that project (each instance usually representing a different language); multiple Wikisources make up the overall project of Wikisource. The project's aims are to host all forms of free text, in many languages, and translations. Originally conceived as an archive to store useful or important historical texts (its first text was the Déclaration universelle des Droits de l'Homme), it has expanded to become a general-content library. The project officially began in November 24, 2003 under the name Project Sourceberg, a play on the famous Project Gutenberg. The name Wikisource
Wikisource
was adopted later that year and it received its own domain name seven months later
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Project Gutenberg
Project Gutenberg
Project Gutenberg
(PG) is a volunteer effort to digitize and archive cultural works, to "encourage the creation and distribution of eBooks".[2] It was founded in 1971 by Michael S. Hart
Michael S. Hart
and is the oldest digital library.[3] Most of the items in its collection are the full texts of public domain books. The project tries to make these as free as possible, in long-lasting, open formats that can be used on almost any computer. As of 23 March 2018[update], Project Gutenberg reached 56,750 items in its collection of free eBooks.[4] The releases are available in plain text but, wherever possible, other formats are included, such as HTML, PDF, EPUB, MOBI, and Plucker. Most releases are in the English language, but many non-English works are also available. There are multiple affiliated projects that are providing additional content, including regional and language-specific works
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