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Jules Marcou
Jules Marcou
Jules Marcou
(April 20, 1824 – April 17, 1898) was a French,[1] Swiss[2] and American[3] geologist. Biography[edit] He was born at Salins, in the département of Jura, in France. He was educated at Besançon
Besançon
and at the Collège Saint Louis, Paris.[2] After completing his studies, he made several excursions through Switzerland to recover his health. These trips led him to devote himself to natural science.[4] During these trips, he met Jules Thurmann (1804-1855), who in turn introduced him to Louis Agassiz.[3] In 1845, he worked with Thurmann on a geological survey of the Jura mountains
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France
France
France
(French: [fʁɑ̃s]), officially the French Republic (French: République française [ʁepyblik fʁɑ̃sɛz]), is a country whose territory consists of metropolitan France
France
in western Europe, as well as several overseas regions and territories.[XIII] The metropolitan area of France
France
extends from the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the English Channel
English Channel
and the North Sea, and from the Rhine
Rhine
to the Atlantic Ocean. The overseas territories include French Guiana
French Guiana
in South America and several islands in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans
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New International Encyclopedia
The New International Encyclopedia
New International Encyclopedia
was an American encyclopedia first published in 1902 by Dodd, Mead and Company.[1] It descended from the International Cyclopaedia (1884) and was updated in 1906, 1914 and 1926.Contents1 History 2 Features 3 Contributors and office editors 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The New International Encyclopedia
New International Encyclopedia
was the successor of the International Cyclopaedia (1884). Initially, the International Cyclopaedia was largely a reprint of Alden's Library of Universal Knowledge, which was a reprint of the British Chambers's Encyclopaedia
Chambers's Encyclopaedia
with American additions (including many biographical entries for Americans). The local Cyclopaedia was much improved by editors Harry Thurston Peck and Selim Peabody
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Stratigraphy
Stratigraphy
Stratigraphy
is a branch of geology concerned with the study of rock layers (strata) and layering (stratification). It is primarily used in the study of sedimentary and layered volcanic rocks
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Mississippi River
The Mississippi
Mississippi
River
River
is the chief river of the second-largest drainage system on the North American continent, second only to the Hudson Bay
Hudson Bay
drainage system.[13][14] The stream is entirely within the United States
United States
(although its drainage basin reaches into Canada), its source is in northern Minnesota
Minnesota
and it flows generally south for 2,320 miles (3,730 km)[14] to the Mississippi
Mississippi
River
River
Delta in the Gulf of Mexico. With its many tributaries, the Mississippi's watershed drains all or parts of 31 U.S. states and two Canadian provinces between the Rocky and Appalachian Mountains. The Mississippi
Mississippi
ranks as the fourth-longest and fifteenth-largest river in the world by discharge
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Pacific Ocean
The Pacific Ocean
Ocean
is the largest and deepest of Earth's oceanic divisions. It extends from the Arctic Ocean
Arctic Ocean
in the north to the Southern Ocean
Southern Ocean
(or, depending on definition, to Antarctica) in the south and is bounded by Asia
Asia
and Australia
Australia
in the west and the Americas
Americas
in the east. At 165,250,000 square kilometers (63,800,000 square miles) in area (as defined with an Antarctic
Antarctic
southern border), this largest division of the World Ocean—and, in turn, the hydrosphere—covers about 46% of Earth's water surface and about one-third of its total surface area, making it larger than all of Earth's land area combined.[1] Both the center of the Water Hemisphere and the Western Hemisphere
Western Hemisphere
are in the Pacific Ocean
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Palaeontology
Paleontology
Paleontology
or palaeontology (/ˌpeɪliɒnˈtɒlədʒi, ˌpæli-, -ən-/) is the scientific study of life that existed prior to, and sometimes including, the start of the Holocene
Holocene
Epoch (roughly 11,700 years before present). It includes the study of fossils to determine organisms' evolution and interactions with each other and their environments (their paleoecology). Paleontological observations have been documented as far back as the 5th century BC. The science became established in the 18th century as a result of Georges Cuvier's work on comparative anatomy, and developed rapidly in the 19th century. The term itself originates from Greek παλαιός, palaios, "old, ancient", ὄν, on (gen
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Zürich
Zürich
Zürich
or Zurich (/ˈzjʊərɪk/ ZEWR-ik) is the largest city in Switzerland
Switzerland
and the capital of the canton of Zürich. It is located in north-central Switzerland[3] at the northwestern tip of Lake Zürich. The municipality has approximately 400,028[4] inhabitants, the urban agglomeration 1.315 million[5] and the Zürich metropolitan area
Zürich metropolitan area
1.83 million.[6] Zürich
Zürich
is a hub for railways, roads, and air traffic. Both Zürich Airport
Zürich Airport
and railway station are the largest and busiest in the country. Permanently settled for over 2000 years, Zürich
Zürich
was founded by the Romans, who, in 15 BC, called it Turicum
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Museum Of Comparative Zoology
The Museum of Comparative Zoology, full name "The Louis Agassiz
Louis Agassiz
Museum of Comparative Zoology", often abbreviated simply to "MCZ", is the zoology museum located on the grounds of Harvard University
Harvard University
in Cambridge, Massachusetts. It is one of three natural history research museums at Harvard whose public face is the Harvard Museum of Natural History. Harvard MCZ's collections consist of some 21 million specimens, of which several thousand are on rotating display at the public museum. The current director of the Museum of Comparative Zoology
Zoology
is James Hanken, the Louis Agassiz
Louis Agassiz
Professor of Zoology
Zoology
at Harvard University. Many of the exhibits in the public museum have not only zoological interest but also historical significance
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Wheeler Survey
The Wheeler Survey
Wheeler Survey
was a survey of a portion of the United States lying west of the 100th meridian. It comprised multiple expeditions, and was supervised by First Lieutenant (later Captain) George Montague Wheeler. The survey team included Lieutenant (later Brigadier General) Montgomery M. Macomb.[1] Wheeler led early expeditions from 1869 to 1871 in the west, and in 1872 the US Congress
US Congress
authorized an ambitious plan to map the portion of the United States
United States
west of the 100th meridian at a scale of 8 miles to the inch. This plan necessitated what became known as the Wheeler Survey
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Southern California
Southern California
California
(colloquially known as SoCal) is a geographic and cultural region that generally comprises California's 10 southernmost counties.[1][2] The region is traditionally described as eight counties, based on demographics and economic ties: Imperial, Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego, Santa Barbara, and Ventura.[3] The more extensive 10-county definition, which includes Kern and San Luis Obispo counties, is also used and is based on historical political divisions.[1] The 8-county and 10-county definitions are not used for the greater Southern California
California
Megaregion, one of the 11 megaregions of the United States
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Mount Auburn Cemetery
Mount Auburn Cemetery
Mount Auburn Cemetery
is the first rural cemetery in the United States, located on the line between Cambridge and Watertown in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, 4 miles (6.4 km) west of Boston, Massachusetts. It is the burial site of many prominent members of the Boston
Boston
Brahmins, as well being a National Historic Landmark. Dedicated in 1831 and set with classical monuments in a rolling landscaped terrain,[2] it marked a distinct break with Colonial-era burying grounds and church-affiliated graveyards. The appearance of this type of landscape coincides with the rising popularity of the term "cemetery," derived from the Greek for "a sleeping place." This language and outlook eclipsed the previous harsh view of death and the afterlife embodied by old graveyards and church burial plots.[3] The 174-acre (70 ha) cemetery is important both for its historical aspects and for its role as an arboretum
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Daniel Coit Gilman
Daniel Coit Gilman
Daniel Coit Gilman
(/ˈɡɪlmən/; July 6, 1831 – October 13, 1908) was an American educator and academic.[1] Gilman was instrumental in founding the Sheffield Scientific School
Sheffield Scientific School
at Yale College,[2] and subsequently served as the third president of the University of California, as the first president of Johns Hopkins University, and as founding president of the Carnegie Institution. He was also co-founder of the Russell Trust Association, which administers the business affairs of Yale's Skull and Bones
Skull and Bones
society
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Public Domain
The legal term public domain refers to works whose exclusive intellectual property rights have expired,[1] have been forfeited,[2] have been expressly waived, or are inapplicable.[3] For example, the works of Shakespeare
Shakespeare
and Beethoven, and most early silent films are in the public domain either by virtue of their having been created before copyright existed, or by their copyright term having expired.[1] Some works are not covered by copyright, and are therefore in the public domain—among them the formulae of Newtonian physics, cooking recipes,[4] and all computer software created prior to 1974.[5] Other works are
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Mammoth Cave
Mammoth Cave
Cave
National Park is a U.S. national park
U.S. national park
in central Kentucky, encompassing portions of Mammoth Cave, the longest cave system known in the world. Since the 1972 unification of Mammoth Cave with the even-longer system under Flint Ridge to the north, the official name of the system has been the Mammoth–Flint Ridge Cave System. The park was established as a national park on July 1, 1941. It became a World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
on October 27, 1981, and an international Biosphere Reserve
Biosphere Reserve
on September 26, 1990. The park's 52,830 acres (21,380 ha) are located primarily in Edmonson County, with small areas extending eastward into Hart County and Barren County. It is centered on the Green River, with a tributary, the Nolin River, feeding into the Green just inside the park
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Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition
The Encyclopædia Britannica
Encyclopædia Britannica
Eleventh Edition (1910–11) is a 29-volume reference work, an edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. It was developed during the encyclopaedia's transition from a British to an American publication. Some of its articles were written by the best-known scholars of the time. This edition of the encyclopedia, containing 40,000 entries, is now in the public domain; and many of its articles have been used as a basis for articles in.[1] However, the outdated nature of some of its content makes its use as a source for modern scholarship problematic
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