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Journal Of American Folklore
The Journal of American Folklore
Folklore
is a peer-reviewed academic journal published by the American Folklore
Folklore
Society. Since 2003 this has been done on its behalf by the University of Illinois Press. The journal has been published since the society's founding in 1888. It publishes on a quarterly schedule and incorporates scholarly articles, essays, and notes relating to its field. It also includes reviews of books, exhibitions and events. Editors[edit] The following persons have been editor-in-chief of the journal:[1] William Wells Newell (1888–1899), vols. 1-12 Alexander Francis Chamberlain (1900–1907), vols. 13-20 Franz Boas
Franz Boas
(1908–1924), vols. 21-37 Ruth Fulton Benedict
Ruth Fulton Benedict
(1925–1939), vols. 38-52 Gladys Reichard (1940), vol.53 Archer Taylor (1941), vol
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ISO 4
ISO 4 (Information and documentation – Rules for the abbreviation of title words and titles of publications) is an international standard which defines a uniform system for the abbreviation of serial titles, i.e., titles of publications such as scientific journals that are published in regular installments.[1] The ISSN
ISSN
International Centre, which the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO) has appointed as the registration authority for ISO 4, maintains the "List of Title Word Abbreviations" (LTWA), which contains standard abbreviations for words commonly found in serial titles. As of August 2017, the standard's most recent update came in 1997[2], when its third edition was released.[3] One major use of ISO 4 is to abbreviate the names of scientific journals using the List of Title Word Abbreviations (LTWA)
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Academic Journal
An academic or scholarly journal is a periodical publication in which scholarship relating to a particular academic discipline is published. Academic
Academic
journals serve as permanent and transparent forums for the presentation, scrutiny and discussion of research. They are usually peer-reviewed or refereed.[1] Content typically takes the form of articles presenting original research, review articles, and book reviews. The purpose of an academic journal, according to the first editor of the world's oldest academic journal Henry Oldenburg, is to give researchers a venue to "impart their knowledge to one another, and contribute what they can to the Grand design of improving natural knowledge, and perfecting all Philosophical Arts, and Sciences."[2] The term academic journal applies to scholarly publications in all fields; this article discusses the aspects common to all academic field journals
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Gladys Reichard
Gladys Amanda Reichard (born 17 July 1893 at Bangor, Pennsylvania; died 25 July 1955 at Flagstaff, Arizona) was an American anthropologist and linguist. She is considered one of the most important woman to have studied Native American languages in the first half of the twentieth century. She is best known for her studies of three different Native American languages: Wiyot, Coeur d'Alene and Navajo.[1][2][3] Biography[edit] Reichard received her bachelor's degree from Swarthmore College
Swarthmore College
in 1919 and her master's degree from the same institution in 1920.[4] She started fieldwork on Wiyot in 1922 under the supervision of A.L. Kroeber of the University of California-Berkeley.[4] Reichard attended Columbia University
Columbia University
for her PhD, which she earned in 1925 for her grammar of Wiyot, written under Franz Boas.[4][5] In 1923, she took up a position as Instructor in Anthropology at Barnard College
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Ruth Fulton Benedict
Ruth Fulton Benedict (June 5, 1887 – September 17, 1948) was an American anthropologist and folklorist. She was born in New York City, attended Vassar College and graduated in 1909. After studying anthropology at the New School of Social Research under Elsie Clews Parsons, she entered graduate studies at Columbia University in 1921, where she studied under Franz Boas. She received her PhD and joined the faculty in 1923
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Richard M. Dorson
Richard Mercer Dorson (March 12, 1916 – September 11, 1981) was an American folklorist, author, professor, and director of the Folklore Institute at Indiana University.Contents1 Biography 2 Bibliography 3 See also 4 Notes and referencesBiography[edit] Dorson was born in New York City. He studied at the Phillips Exeter Academy from 1929 to 1933.[1] He then went on to Harvard University
Harvard University
where he earned his A.B., M.A., in history, and his Ph.D. degree in the History of American Civilization in 1942. He began teaching as an instructor of history at Harvard in 1943. He moved to Michigan State University
Michigan State University
in 1944 staying there until 1957 when he took a position at Indiana University
Indiana University
as professor of history and folklore as well as that of chairman of the Committee on Folklore
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Outline Of Academic Disciplines
An academic discipline or field of study is a branch of knowledge that is taught and researched as part of higher education. A scholar's discipline is commonly defined by the university faculties and learned societies to which he or she belongs and the academic journals in which he or she publishes research. Disciplines vary between well-established ones that exist in almost all universities and have well-defined rosters of journals and conferences and nascent ones supported by only a few universities and publications
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Editor-in-chief
An editor-in-chief, also known as lead editor, chief editor, managing or executive editor, is a publication's editorial leader who has final responsibility for its operations and policies.[1][2]Contents1 Description 2 References 3 Further reading 4 External linksDescription[edit] The editor-in-chief heads all departments of the organization and is held accountable for delegating tasks to staff members and managing them. The term is often used at newspapers, magazines, yearbooks, and television news programs. The editor-in-chief is commonly the link between the publisher or proprietor and the editorial stafplied to academic journals, where the editor-in-chief gives the ultimate decision whether a submitted manuscript will be published
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Américo Paredes
Américo Paredes (September 3, 1915 – May 5, 1999) was a Mexican-American author born in Brownsville, Texas who authored several texts focusing on the border life that existed between the United States and Mexico, particularly around the Rio Grande region of South Texas. His family on his father’s side, however, had been in the Americas since 1580. His ancestors were sefarditas, or Spanish Jews who had been converted to Christianity, and in 1749 - along with Escandon - they settled in the lower Rio Grande. The year of Paredes’ birth was the year of the last Texas Mexican Uprising, which was to portend the life Paredes was to lead. Throughout his long career as a journalist, folklorist and professor, Paredes was to bring focus to his Mexican American heritage, and the beauty of those traditions
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Peer Review
Peer review
Peer review
is the evaluation of work by one or more people of similar competence to the producers of the work (peers). It constitutes a form of self-regulation by qualified members of a profession within the relevant field. Peer review
Peer review
methods are employed to maintain standards of quality, improve performance, and provide credibility. In academia, scholarly peer review is often used to determine an academic paper's suitability for publication. Peer review
Peer review
can be categorized by the type of activity and by the field or profession in which the activity occurs, e.g., medical peer review.Contents1 Professional 2 Scholarly 3 Government policy 4 Medical 5 See also 6 ReferencesProfessional[edit] Professional peer review focuses on the performance of professionals, with a view to improving quality, upholding standards, or providing certification
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JSTOR
JSTOR
JSTOR
(/ˈdʒeɪstɔːr/ JAY-stor;[3] short for Journal Storage) is a digital library founded in 1995. Originally containing digitized back issues of academic journals, it now also includes books and primary sources, and current issues of journals.[4] It provides full-text searches of almost 2,000 journals.[5] As of 2013, more than 8,000 institutions in more than 160 countries had access to JSTOR;[5] most access is by subscription, but some older public domain content is freely available to anyone.[6] JSTOR's revenue was $69 million in 2014.[7]Contents1 History 2 Content 3 Access3.1 Aaron Swartz
Aaron Swartz
incident 3.2 Limitations 3.3 Increasing public access4 Use 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksHistory[edit] William G
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OCLC
OCLC, currently incorporated as OCLC
OCLC
Online Computer Library Center, Incorporated,[3] is an American nonprofit cooperative organization "dedicated to the public purposes of furthering access to the world's information and reducing information costs".[4] It was founded in 1967 as the Ohio College Library Center. OCLC
OCLC
and its member libraries cooperatively produce and maintain WorldCat, the largest online public access catalog (OPAC) in the world
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
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International Standard Serial Number
An International Standard Serial Number
International Standard Serial Number
(ISSN) is an eight-digit serial number used to uniquely identify a serial publication.[1] The ISSN is especially helpful in distinguishing between serials with the same title. ISSN are used in ordering, cataloging, interlibrary loans, and other practices in connection with serial literature.[2] The ISSN system was first drafted as an International Organization for Standardization (ISO) international standard in 1971 and published as ISO 3297 in 1975.[3] ISO subcommittee TC 46/SC 9 is responsible for maintaining the standard. When a serial with the same content is published in more than one media type, a different ISSN is assigned to each media type. For example, many serials are published both in print and electronic media
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Richard Bauman
Richard Bauman is a folklorist and anthropologist, now retired from Indiana University
Indiana University
Bloomington.[1] He is Distinguished Professor emeritus of Folklore, of Anthropology, and of Communication and Culture. Before coming to IU in 1985, he was the Director of the Center for Intercultural Studies in Folklore and Ethnomusicology (now known as the Américo Paredes Center for Cultural Studies) at the University of Texas
University of Texas
and a faculty member in the UT Department of Anthropology. Just before retiring from Indiana, he was chair of the IU Department of Folklore and Ethnomusicology, as well as an important member of the Department of Anthropology and the Department of Communication and Culture. Bauman earned a B.A. with honors and distinction in English from the University of Michigan. He then earned an M.A. in folklore in 1962 at Indiana University, working closely with W
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Humanities
Humanities
Humanities
are academic disciplines that study aspects of human society and culture. In the renaissance, the term contrasted with divinity and referred to what is now called classics, the main area of secular study in universities at the time
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