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Joseph Jacobs
JOSEPH JACOBS (29 August 1854 – 30 January 1916) was an Australian folklorist , literary critic, social scientist, historian and writer of English literature who became a notable collector and publisher of English folklore . His work went on to popularize some of the world's best known versions of English fairy tales including "Jack and the Beanstalk ", "Goldilocks and the three bears ", "The Three Little Pigs ", " Jack the Giant Killer
Jack the Giant Killer
" and "The History of Tom Thumb ". He published his English fairy tale collections: English Fairy Tales
Fairy Tales
in 1890 and More English Fairy Tales
Fairy Tales
in 1893 but also went on after and in between both books to publish fairy tales collected from continental Europe as well as Jewish, Celtic and Indian fairytales which made him one of the most popular writers of fairytales for the English language
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Joseph Jacobs (other)
JOSEPH JACOBS (1854–1916) was an Australian folklorist, literary critic and historian. JOSEPH JACOBS may also refer to: * Joseph J. Jacobs (1916–2004), American chemical engineer * Josef Jacobs (1894–1978), German pilot * Joey Jacobs (born 1960), British boxer * Joe Jacobs (American football) (born 1970), Arena Football league player * Joe Jacobs (actor) (born 1983), English actor * Joe Jacobs (Emmerdale) * Joe Jacobs (speedway rider) (born 1993), British speedway riderSEE ALSO * Joseph Jacob (other) This disambiguation page lists articles about people with the same name. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article. Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Joseph_Jacobs_(other) additional terms may apply
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Sydney
SYDNEY (/ˈsɪdni/ ( listen )) is the state capital of New South Wales
Wales
and the most populous city in Australia
Australia
and Oceania
Oceania
. Located on Australia's east coast, the metropolis surrounds the world\'s largest natural harbour and sprawls about 70 km (43.5 mi) on its periphery towards the Blue Mountains to the west , Hawkesbury to the north and Macarthur to the south . Sydney
Sydney
is made up of 658 suburbs , 40 local government areas and 15 contiguous regions . Residents of the city are known as "Sydneysiders". As at June 2016 Sydney's estimated population was 5,029,768. The Sydney
Sydney
area has been inhabited by indigenous Australians for at least 30,000 years. Lieutenant James Cook first landed at Kurnell in 1770, when navigating his way up the east coast of Australia
Australia
on his ship, _ HMS Endeavour _
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Australia
Coordinates : 25°S 133°E / 25°S 133°E / -25; 133 Commonwealth of Australia Flag Coat of arms ANTHEM: " Advance Australia Fair " CAPITAL Canberra 35°18′29″S 149°07′28″E / 35.30806°S 149.12444°E / -35.30806; 149.12444 LARGEST CITY Sydney NATIONAL LANGUAGE English RELIGION * 52.1% Christianity * 30.1% No religion * 9.6% Not stated or unclear * 2.6%
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Yonkers, New York
Coordinates : 40°56′29″N 73°51′52″W / 40.94139°N 73.86444°W / 40.94139; -73.86444 YONKERS, NEW YORK City Corporation of the City of Yonkers View of Yonkers from the New Jersey Palisades in 2013 Flag Seal Nickname(s): The Central City, The City of Gracious Living, The City of Seven Hills, The City with Vision, The Sixth Borough , The Terrace City Location in Westchester County and the State of New York Coordinates: 40°56′29″N 73°51′52″W / 40.94139°N 73.86444
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Folklorist
FOLKLORISTICS, also known as FOLKLORE STUDIES in North America, and TRADITION STUDIES or FOLK LIFE STUDIES in Britain , is the formal academic discipline devoted to the study of folklore . This term, along with its synonyms, gained currency in the 1950s to distinguish the academic study of traditional culture from the folklore artifacts themselves. It became established as a field across both Europe and North America, coordinating with Volkskunde (German), folkermimne (Norwegian), and folkminnen (Swedish) among others
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Critic
A CRITIC is a professional who communicates an assessment and an opinion of various forms of creative works such as art, literature, music, cinema, theater, fashion, architecture, and food. Critics may also take as their subject social or government policy. Critical judgments, whether derived from critical thinking or not, weigh up a range of factors, including an assessment of the extent to which the item under review achieves its purpose and its creator's intention and a knowledge of its context. They may also include a positive or negative personal response. Characteristics of a good critic are articulateness, preferably having the ability to use language with a high level of appeal and skill. Sympathy, sensitivity and insight are important too. Form, style and medium are all considered by the critic. In architecture and food criticism, the item's function, value and cost may be added components
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Historian
A HISTORIAN is a person who researches, studies, and writes about the past, and is regarded as an authority on it. Historians are concerned with the continuous, methodical narrative and research of past events as relating to the human race; as well as the study of all history in time. If the individual is concerned with events preceding written history , the individual is an historian of prehistory . Although "historian" can be used to describe amateur and professional historians alike, it is reserved more recently for those who have acquired graduate degrees in the discipline. Some historians, though, are recognized by publications or training and experience. "Historian" became a professional occupation in the late nineteenth century as research universities were emerging in Germany and elsewhere
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English Folklore
ENGLISH FOLKLORE is the folk tradition which has developed in England over a number of centuries. Some stories can be traced back to their roots, while the origin of others is uncertain or disputed. England abounds with folklore, in all forms, from such obvious manifestations as the traditional Robin Hood tales, the Brythonic -inspired Arthurian legend , to contemporary urban legends and facets of cryptozoology such as the Beast of Bodmin Moor . Morris dance and related practices such as the Abbots Bromley Horn Dance preserve old English folk traditions, as do Mummers Plays . Pub names may preserve folk traditions. English folklore is largely drawn from Celtic , Germanic and Christian sources
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The Story Of The Three Bears
"GOLDILOCKS AND THE THREE BEARS" and the older still "THE STORY OF THE THREE BEARS" are two variations of a 19th-century fairy tale . The original tale tells of an ugly, old woman who enters the forest home of three bachelor bears whilst they are away. She sits in their chairs, eats some of their porridge , and falls asleep in one of their beds. When the bears return and discover her, she starts up, jumps from the window, and is never seen again. The other major version brings Goldilocks to the tale (replacing the old woman), and an even later version retained Goldilocks, but has the three bachelor bears transformed into Papa, Mama, and Baby Bear. What was originally a fearsome oral tale became a cozy family story with only a hint of menace. The story has elicited various interpretations and has been adapted to film, opera, and other media. "The Story of the Three Bears" is one of the most popular fairy tales in the English language
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The Three Little Pigs
THE THREE LITTLE PIGS is a fable about three anthropomorphic pigs who build three houses of different materials. A big bad wolf blows down the first two pigs' houses, made of straw and sticks respectively, but is unable to destroy the third pig's house, made of bricks . Printed versions date back to the 1840s, but the story itself is thought to be much older. The phrases used in the story, and the various morals drawn from it, have become embedded in Western culture . Many versions of The Three Little Pigs
The Three Little Pigs
have been recreated or have been modified over the years, sometimes making the wolf a kind character. It is a type 124 folktale in the Aarne–Thompson classification system
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Jack The Giant Killer
"JACK THE GIANT KILLER" is an English fairy tale and legend about a young adult who slays a number of giants during King Arthur 's reign. The tale is characterised by violence, gore and blood-letting. Giants are prominent in Cornish folklore
Cornish folklore
, Breton mythology and Welsh Bardic lore . Some parallels to elements and incidents in Norse mythology have been detected in the tale, and the trappings of Jack's last adventure with the Giant
Giant
Galigantus suggest parallels with French and Breton fairy tales such as Bluebeard . Jack's belt is similar to the belt in " The Valiant Little Tailor
The Valiant Little Tailor
", and his magical sword, shoes, cap, and cloak are similar to those owned by Tom Thumb
Tom Thumb
or those found in Welsh and Norse mythology
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Tom Thumb
TOM THUMB is a character of English folklore . The History of Tom Thumb was published in 1621 , and was the first fairy tale printed in English. Tom is no bigger than his father's thumb, and his adventures include being swallowed by a cow, tangling with giants , and becoming a favourite of King Arthur . The earliest allusions to Tom occur in various 16th-century works such as Reginald Scot 's Discovery of Witchcraft (1584), where Tom is cited as one of the supernatural folk employed by servant maids to frighten children. Tattershall in Lincolnshire, England, reputedly has the home and grave of Tom Thumb. Aside from his own tales, Tom figures in Henry Fielding
Henry Fielding
's play Tom Thumb , a companion piece to his The Author\'s Farce . It was later expanded into a single piece titled The Tragedy of Tragedies, or the History of Tom Thumb
Tom Thumb
the Great
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Folklore
FOLKLORE is expressive body of culture shared by a particular group of people; it encompasses the traditions common to that culture, subculture or group. These include oral traditions such as tales , proverbs and jokes . They include material culture , ranging from traditional building styles to handmade toys common to the group. Folklore also includes customary lore , the forms and rituals of celebrations such as Christmas and weddings, folk dances and initiation rites. Each one of these, either singly or in combination, is considered a folklore artifact . Just as essential as the form, folklore also encompasses the transmission of these artifacts from one region to another or from one generation to the next. For folklore is not taught in a formal school curriculum or studied in the fine arts . Instead these traditions are passed along informally from one individual to another either through verbal instruction or demonstration
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Panchatantra
The PANCHATANTRA ( IAST : Pañcatantra, Sanskrit
Sanskrit
: पञ्चतन्त्र, "Five Treatises") is an ancient Indian collection of interrelated animal fables in Sanskrit
Sanskrit
verse and prose, arranged within a frame story . The surviving work is dated to about 300 BCE, but the fables are likely much more ancient. The text's author is unknown, but has been attributed to Vishnu Sharma in some recensions and Vasubhaga in others, both of which may be fictitious pen names. It is likely a Hindu text , and based on older oral traditions with "animal fables that are as old as we are able to imagine". It is "certainly the most frequently translated literary product of India", and these stories are among the most widely known in the world. It goes by many names in many cultures
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Aesop's Fables
AESOP\'S FABLES, or the AESOPICA, is a collection of fables credited to Aesop , a slave and storyteller believed to have lived in ancient Greece
Greece
between 620 and 564 BC. Of diverse origins, the stories associated with his name have descended to modern times through a number of sources and continue to be reinterpreted in different verbal registers and in popular as well as artistic media. The fables originally belonged to the oral tradition and were not collected for some three centuries after Aesop's death. By that time a variety of other stories, jokes and proverbs were being ascribed to him, although some of that material was from sources earlier than him or came from beyond the Greek cultural sphere. The process of inclusion has continued until the present, with some of the fables