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Jones Oxidation
The Jones oxidation
Jones oxidation
is an organic reaction for the oxidation of primary and secondary alcohols to carboxylic acids and ketones, respectively. It is named after its discoverer, Sir Ewart Jones.[1]Jones reagent consists of chromium trioxide and sulfuric acid dissolved in a mixture of acetone and water. As an alternative, potassium dichromate can be used in place of chromium trioxide. The oxidation is very rapid, quite exothermic, and the yields are typically high. The reagent rarely oxidizes unsaturated bonds.Contents1 Stoichiometry 2 Mechanism 3 Illustrative reactions and applications 4 Related processes 5 References 6 Historical referencesStoichiometry[edit] Jones reagent will convert primary and secondary alcohols to aldehydes and ketones, respectively. Depending on the reaction conditions, the aldehydes may then be converted to carboxylic acids
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Comproportionation
Comproportionation or synproportionation is a chemical reaction where two reactants, each containing the same element but with a different oxidation number, form a product in which the elements involved reach the same oxidation number
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C. Djerassi
Carl Djerassi (October 29, 1923 – January 30, 2015) was an Austrian-born Bulgarian-American chemist, novelist, playwright and founder of the Djerassi Artist Residency. He is best known for his contribution to the development of oral contraceptive pills,[1][2][3] nicknamed the father of the pill.[4]Contents1 Early life 2 Education 3 Career 4 Publications4.1 Science-in-fiction 4.2 Science-in-theatre 4.3 Poetry 4.4 Non-fiction 4.5 Fiction 4.6 Drama5 Awards and honors 6 Personal life 7 References 8 External linksEarly life[edit] Carl Djerassi was born in Vienna, Austria, but spent the first years of his infancy in Sofia, Bulgaria, the home of his father, Samuel Djerassi, a dermatologist and specialist in sexually transmitted diseases.[5][6] His mother was Alice Friedmann, a Viennese dentist and physician. Both parents were Jewish.[1] Following his parents' divorce, Djerassi and his mother moved to Vienna
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Jerry March
Jerry March, Ph.D. (August 1, 1929 – December 25, 1997) was an organic chemist and a professor of chemistry at Adelphi University. Dr. March authored the acclaimed March's Advanced Organic Chemistry text, which is considered to be a pillar of graduate-level organic chemistry texts. The book was prepared in its fifth edition at the time of Dr. March's death. Michael B. Smith, Ph.D., carries on his work. External links[edit] New York Times obituaryAuthority controlWorldCat Identities VIAF: 108141007 LCCN: n50040672 ISNI: 0000 0001 0930 7576 GND: 131388568 SUDOC: 031754201 BNF: cb12291089g (data) BIBSYS: 90116678 NDL: 00448786This biographical article about a chemist is a stub
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Organic Syntheses
Organic Syntheses is a peer-reviewed scientific journal that was established in 1921. It publishes detailed and checked procedures for the synthesis of organic compounds. A unique feature of the review process is that all of the data and experiments reported in an article must be successfully repeated in the laboratory of a member of the editorial board as a check for reproducibility prior to publication.[1][2] The journal is published by Organic Syntheses, Inc., a non-profit corporation.[3] An annual print version is published by John Wiley & Sons on behalf of Organic Syntheses, Inc.Contents1 History 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] Prior to World War I, work on synthetic organic chemistry in the United States had been quite limited, and most of the reagents used in laboratories had to be imported from Europe
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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J. Chem. Soc.
The Journal of the Chemical Society
Chemical Society
was a scientific journal established by the Chemical Society
Chemical Society
in 1849 as the Quarterly Journal of the Chemical Society. The journal underwent several renamings, splits, and mergers throughout its history. In 1980, the Chemical Society merged with several other organizations into the Royal Society of Chemistry
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J. Org. Chem.
The Journal of Organic Chemistry, colloquially known as JOC or J Org, is a peer-reviewed[1] scientific journal for original contributions of fundamental research in all branches of theory and practice[2] in organic and bioorganic chemistry. It is published by the publishing arm of the American Chemical Society, with 24 issues per year. According to the Journal Citation
Citation
Reports, the journal had a 2016 impact factor of 4.849[3] and it is the journal that received the most cites (99,193 in 2016) in the field of organic chemistry.[2] According to Web of Knowledge
Web of Knowledge
(and as December 2012), eleven papers from the journal have received more than 1,000 citations, with the most cited paper[4] having received 7,967 citations. The current Editor-in-Chief is Scott J. Miller from Yale University.[5] Indexing[edit] J. Org. Chem
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Drug
A drug is any substance (other than food that provides nutritional support) that, when inhaled, injected, smoked, consumed, absorbed via a patch on the skin, or dissolved under the tongue causes a temporary physiological (and often psychological) change in the body.[2][3] In pharmacology, a pharmaceutical drug, also called a medication or medicine, is a chemical substance used to treat, cure, prevent, or diagnose a disease or to promote well-being.[2] Traditionally drugs were obtained through extraction from medicinal plants, but more recently also by organic synthesis.[4] Pharmaceutical drugs may be used for a limited duration, or on a regular basis for chronic disorders.[5] Pharmaceutical drugs are often classified into drug classes—groups of related drugs that have similar chemical structures, the same mechanism of action (binding to the same biological target), a related mode of action, and that are used to treat the same disease.[6][verification needed][7] The Anatomical Therape
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Salicylic Acid
Salicylic acid
Salicylic acid
(from Latin
Latin
salix, willow tree) is a lipophilic monohydroxybenzoic acid, a type of phenolic acid, and a beta hydroxy acid (BHA). It has the formula C7H6O3. This colorless crystalline organic acid is widely used in organic synthesis and functions as a plant hormone. It is derived from the metabolism of salicin. In addition to serving as an important active metabolite of aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid), which acts in part as a prodrug to salicylic acid, it is probably best known for its use as a key ingredient in topical anti-acne products
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Breathalyzer
A breathalyzer or breathalyser (a portmanteau of breath and analyzer/analyser) is a device for estimating blood alcohol content (BAC) from a breath sample
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Infrared Spectroscopy
Infrared
Infrared
spectroscopy (IR spectroscopy or vibrational spectroscopy) involves the interaction of infrared radiation with matter. It covers a range of techniques, mostly based on absorption spectroscopy. As with all spectroscopic techniques, it can be used to identify and study chemicals. Samples may be solid, liquid, or gas. The method or technique of infrared spectroscopy is conducted with an instrument called an infrared spectrometer (or spectrophotometer) to produce an infrared spectrum. An IR spectrum can be visualized in a graph of infrared light absorbance (or transmittance) on the vertical axis vs. frequency or wavelength on the horizontal axis. Typical units of frequency used in IR spectra are reciprocal centimeters (sometimes called wave numbers), with the symbol cm−1. Units of IR wavelength are commonly given in micrometers (formerly called "microns"), symbol μm, which are related to wave numbers in a reciprocal way
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Organic Synthesis
Organic synthesis is a special branch of chemical synthesis and is concerned with the intentional construction of organic compounds via organic reactions.[1] Organic molecules often contain a higher level of complexity than purely inorganic compounds, so that the synthesis of organic compounds has developed into one of the most important branches of organic chemistry
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Hemiacetal
A hemiacetal or a hemiketal is a compound that results from the addition of an alcohol to an aldehyde or a ketone, respectively. The Greek word hèmi, meaning half, refers to the fact that a single alcohol has been added to the carbonyl group, in contrast to acetals or ketals, which are formed when a second alkoxy group has been added to the structure.[1]Contents1 Formula and formation1.1 Cyclic hemiacetals and hemiketals2 Synthesis 3 Reactions 4 ReferencesFormula and formation[edit]Above: 1-ethoxybutan-1-ol, a hemiacetal
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