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Johnston Press
Johnston Press
Johnston Press
plc is a multimedia company based in Edinburgh, Scotland.[2] Its flagship titles include national newspaper the i, The Scotsman, the Yorkshire Post, the Falkirk Herald, The News (Portsmouth) and The News Letter
The News Letter
in Belfast. The Falkirk Herald
Falkirk Herald
was the then Falkirk-based company's first acquisition in 1846. It now also operates around 200 other newspapers and associated websites around the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and the Isle of Man
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List Of Business Entities
A business entity is an entity that is formed and administered as per corporate law in order to engage in business activities, charitable work, or other activities allowable. Most often, business entities are formed to sell a product or a service. There are many types of business entities defined in the legal systems of various countries. These include corporations, cooperatives, partnerships, sole traders, limited liability company and other specifically permitted and labelled types of entities. The specific rules vary by country and by state or province
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Net Income
In business, net income (total comprehensive income, net earnings, net profit, informally, bottom line) is an entity's income minus cost of goods sold, expenses and taxes for an accounting period.[1] It is computed as the residual of all revenues and gains over all expenses and losses for the period,[2] and has also been defined as the net increase in shareholders' equity that results from a company's operations.[3] In the context of the presentation of financial statements, the IFRS Foundation
IFRS Foundation
defines net income as synonymous with profit and loss.[1] Net income
Net income
is the same as net profit but a distinct accounting concept from profit
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Online
In computer technology and telecommunications, online indicates a state of connectivity, and offline indicates a disconnected state, specifically an internet connection. Online and offline are defined by Standard 1037C.[citation needed] They are states or conditions of a "device or equipment" or of a "functional unit"
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3i
3i Group plc is a multinational private equity and venture capital company based in London, United Kingdom. 3i is listed on the London Stock Exchange and is a constituent of the FTSE 100 Index.Contents1 History 2 Operations 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] The company was formed in 1945, as the Industrial and Commercial Finance Corporation (ICFC), by the Bank of England
Bank of England
and the major British banks to provide long-term investment funding for small and medium-sized enterprises
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Public Limited Company
A public limited company (legally abbreviated to plc) is a type of public company under the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
company law, some Commonwealth jurisdictions, and the Republic of Ireland. It is a limited liability company whose shares may be freely sold and traded to the public (although a plc may also be privately held, often by another plc), with a minimum share capital of £50,000 and usually with the letters PLC after its name.[1] Similar companies in the United States are called publicly traded companies. Public limited companies will also have a separate legal identity. A PLC can be either an unlisted or listed company on the stock exchanges. In the United Kingdom, a public limited company usually must include the words "public limited company" or the abbreviation "PLC" or "plc" at the end and as part of the legal company name
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Chesterfield
Chesterfield
Chesterfield
is a market town and borough in Derbyshire, England.[1] It lies 24 miles (39 km) north of Derby
Derby
and 11 miles (18 km) south of Sheffield
Sheffield
at the confluence of the rivers Rother and Hipper. Including Whittington, Brimington
Brimington
and Staveley it had a population of about 103,800 in 2011,[2] making it the second largest town in the ceremonial county after Derby. Archaeologists trace it back to a Roman fort built in the 1st century AD,[3] but soon abandoned. Later an Anglo-Saxon village developed. The name derives from the Old English ceaster (a Roman fort) and feld (grazing land).[4][5] It has a street market of some 250 stalls three days a week.[6] The town sits on a coalfield, which was economically important until the 1980s. Little visual evidence of mining remains
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Belfast
Belfast
Belfast
(/ˈbɛlfɑːst, -fæst/; from Irish: Béal Feirste), meaning "rivermouth of the sandbanks"[11] is the capital and largest city of Northern Ireland, and the second largest on the island of Ireland.[12] On the River Lagan, it had a population of 333,871 in 2015.[1] By the early 1800s the former town was home to a major port. Belfast played a key role in the Industrial Revolution
Industrial Revolution
in the 19th century, becoming the biggest linen producer in the world, earning it the nickname "Linenopolis". By the time it was granted city status in 1888, it was a major centre of the Irish linen as well as tobacco-processing, rope-making and shipbuilding industries. Harland and Wolff, which built the RMS Titanic, was the world's biggest and most productive shipyard.[13] It later also sustained a major aerospace and missiles industry
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Tindle Newspapers
Tindle Newspapers Group publish over 200 local newspapers in the UK, a number of which are over 100 years old. They are based in Farnham, Surrey, and the Chief Executive, as at 2007, was Mr Brian Doel. The owner and managing director is Sir Ray Tindle, who is a strong believer in ultra-local journalism.[1] Tindle Newspapers Group is a separate company to the Tindle Radio Group. In 2003 as the Iraq War started, the owner of the Tindle Newspaper Group, Sir Ray Tindle, issued an order to his newspapers that they could no longer cover anti-war protests.[2] This decision was controversial and was attacked as censorship by a number of commentators, including the National Union of Journalists General Secretary Jeremy Dear.[3] External links[edit]Tindle Newspaper website.Notes and references[edit]^ "Tindle Newspaper Group". Hold the Front Page
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East Midlands
The East Midlands
East Midlands
is one of nine official regions of England
England
at the first level of NUTS for statistical purposes. The eastern part of the Midlands, it consists of Derbyshire, Leicestershire, Lincolnshire (except North and North East Lincolnshire), Northamptonshire, Nottinghamshire
Nottinghamshire
and Rutland. The region has an area of 15,627 km2 (6,034 sq mi), and was home to over 4.5 million people in 2011. There are five principal urban centres, Derby, Leicester, Lincoln, Northampton
Northampton
and Nottingham; and a number of next tier centres including Boston, Chesterfield, Corby, Grantham, Hinckley, Kettering, Loughborough, Mansfield, Newark and Wellingborough
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Local World
Local World Ltd. is a large regional newspaper publisher in the UK that publishes around 100 print titles and more than 70 websites. It was formed in 2012 by David Montgomery, a former chief executive of Trinity Mirror, to buy the Daily Mail and General Trust's Northcliffe Media business, and the Yattendon Group's Iliffe newspaper group.[1] In October 2015, Trinity Mirror
Trinity Mirror
reached agreement with Local World's other shareholders to buy the company.[2] The sale was completed on 13 November 2015.[3] In April 2017 the Local World website started redirecting to the Trinity Mirror
Trinity Mirror
website.[4]Contents1 History1.1 Titles 1.2 Ilife News and Media titles2 References 3 External linksHistory[edit] Local World was established in 2012 by David Montgomery, in order to purchase local newspaper businesses
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Associated Newspapers
DMG Media, formerly Associated Newspapers, is a national newspaper and website publisher in the UK. It is a subsidiary of DMGT. The group was established in 1905 and is currently based at Northcliffe House in Kensington. It takes responsibility for Harmsworth Printing Limited which produces all of its London, Southern England and South Wales editions of the national titles out of print works in Thurrock, Essex, and Didcot, Oxfordshire. DMG Media owns the Daily Mail, MailOnline, the Mail on Sunday, Metro, Wowcher, Jobsite and Jobrapido. Its portfolio of national newspapers, websites and mobile and tablet applications regularly reach 55%*[1] of the GB adult population: it includes two major paid-for national newspaper titles as well as a free nationally available newspaper
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Flagship Product
A core product is a company product or service that is most directly related to its core competencies
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East Anglia
East Anglia
East Anglia
is a geographical area in the East of England. The area included has varied[1] but the legally defined NUTS 2 statistical unit comprises the counties of Norfolk, Suffolk
Suffolk
and Cambridgeshire, including the City of Peterborough
Peterborough
unitary authority.[2] The name derives from the Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
kingdom of the East Angles, a tribe that originated in Angeln, northern Germany.Contents1 Area 2 History 3 Geography3.1 Climate4 Transport 5 Universities 6 Enterprise zones 7 Symbols and culture 8 Tourism 9 See also 10 Notes 11 References 12 External linksArea[edit] Definitions of what constitutes East Anglia
East Anglia
vary
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Earnings Before Interest And Taxes
In accounting and finance, earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT), is a measure of a firm's profit that includes all expenses except interest and income tax expenses.[1] It is the difference between operating revenues and operating expenses. When a firm does not have non-operating income, operating income is sometimes used as a synonym for EBIT and operating profit.[2]EBIT = revenue – operating expenses (OPEX)Operating income = revenue – operating expenses[1] A professional investor contemplating a change to the capital structure of a firm (e.g., through a leveraged buyout) first evaluates a firm's fundamental earnings potential (reflected by earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) and EBIT), and then determines the optimal use of debt vs. equity. To calculate EBIT, expenses (e.g
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Newspaper
A newspaper is a periodical publication containing written information about current events. Newspapers
Newspapers
can cover wide variety of fields such as politics, business, sport and art and often include materials such as opinion columns, weather forecasts, reviews of local services, obituaries, birth notices, crosswords, editorial cartoons, comic strips, and advice columns. Most newspapers are businesses, and they pay their expenses with a mixture of subscription revenue, newsstand sales, and advertising revenue. The journalism organizations that publish newspapers are themselves often metonymically called newspapers. Newspapers
Newspapers
have traditionally been published in print (usually on cheap, low-grade paper called newsprint)
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