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Johns Hopkins University
Johns Hopkins
Johns Hopkins
University
University
is an American private research university in Baltimore, Maryland. Founded in 1876, the university was named for its first benefactor, the American entrepreneur, abolitionist, and philanthropist Johns Hopkins.[5] His $7 million bequest (~$150 million in 2017 dollars)—of which half financed the establishment of Johns Hopkins Hospital—was the largest philanthropic gift in the history of the United States
United States
at that time.[6] Daniel Coit Gilman, who was inaugurated as the institution's first president on February 22, 1876,[7] led the university to revolutionize higher education in the U.S
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Germany
Coordinates: 51°N 9°E / 51°N 9°E / 51; 9Federal Republic
Republic
of GermanyBundesrepublik Deutschland (German)[a] Flag Coat of arms Motto: "Einigkeit und Recht und Freiheit" (de facto)(English: "Unity and Justice and Freedom")Anthem: "Deutschlandlied"[b](English: "Song of Germany")Show globeShow map of EuropeLocation of Germany (dark green)– in Europe (green & dark grey)– in the European Union (green)Capitaland largest cityBerlin[c]52
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Provost (education)
A provost is the senior academic administrator at many institutions of higher education in the United States
United States
and Canada, the equivalent of a pro-vice-chancellor at some institutions in the United Kingdom and Ireland, or a Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) at most Australian universities. Additionally, the heads of certain colleges in the UK and Ireland are called provosts; it is, in this sense, the equivalent of a master (or various other titles for the head of the college) at other colleges.Contents1 Duties, role, titles, and selection 2 Other titles a
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Graduate School
A graduate school (sometimes shortened as grad school) is a school that awards advanced academic degrees (i.e. master's and doctoral degrees) with the general requirement that students must have earned a previous undergraduate (bachelor's) degree[1][2] with a high grade point average. A distinction is typically made between graduate schools (where courses of study vary in the degree to which they provide training for a particular profession) and professional schools, which offer specialized advanced degrees in professional fields such as medicine, nursing, business, engineering, speech-language pathology, or law. The distinction between graduate schools and professional schools is not absolute, as various professional schools offer graduate degrees (e.g., some nursing schools offer a master's degree in nursing). Also, some graduate degrees train students for a specific profession (e.g
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Abolitionist
Abolitionism
Abolitionism
is a general term which describes the movement to end slavery. This term can be used formally or informally. In Western Europe and the Americas, abolitionism is a historical movement in effort to end the African and Indian slave trade and set slaves free. King Charles I of Spain, usually known as Emperor Charles V, was following the example of Louis X of France
Louis X of France
who abolished slavery within the Kingdom of France
Kingdom of France
in 1315. He passed a law which would have abolished colonial slavery in 1542, although this law was not passed in the largest colonial states, and was not enforced. In the late 17th century, the Roman Catholic Church, taking up a plea by Lourenço da Silva de Mendouça, officially condemned the slave trade, which was affirmed vehemently by Pope Gregory XVI
Pope Gregory XVI
in 1839
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Seal (emblem)
A seal is a device for making an impression in wax, clay, paper, or some other medium, including an embossment on paper, and is also the impression thus made. The original purpose was to authenticate a document, a wrapper for one such as a modern envelope, or the cover of a container or package holding valuables or other objects. The seal-making device is also referred to as the seal matrix or die; the imprint it creates as the seal impression (or, more rarely, the sealing).[1] If the impression is made purely as a relief resulting from the greater pressure on the paper where the high parts of the matrix touch, the seal is known as a dry seal; in other cases ink or another liquid or liquefied medium is used, in another color than the paper. In most traditional forms of dry seal the design on the seal matrix is in intaglio (cut below the flat surface) and therefore the design on the impressions made is in relief (raised above the surface)
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China
China
China
(Chinese: 中国; pinyin: Zhōngguó; lit
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Athletic Nickname
The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States
United States
is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. Typically as a matter of engendering school spirit, the institution either officially or unofficially uses this moniker of the institution's athletic teams also as a nickname to refer to people associated with the institution, especially its current students, but also often its alumni, its faculty, and its administration as well. This practice at the university and college tertiary higher-education level has proven so popular that it extended to the high school secondary-education level in the United States
United States
and in recent years even to the primary-education level as well
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School Colors
In the United States, school colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. Most schools have two colors, which are usually chosen to avoid conflicts with other schools[1] with which the school competes in sports and other activities. The colors are often worn to build morale among the teachers and pupils, and as an expression of school spirit.[2] School
School
colors are often found in pairs and rarely no more than trios, though some professional teams use up to four colors in a set. The choice of colors usually follows the rule of tincture from heraldry, but exceptions to this rule are known. Common primary colors include orange, purple, blue, red, and green. These colors are either paired with a color representing a metal (often black, brown, gray (or silver), white, or gold), or occasionally each other, such as orange/blue, red/green, or blue/yellow
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[note 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation.[1] To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.[2]Contents1 History 2 Geodetic datum 3 Horizontal coordinates3.1 Latitude
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Postgraduate Education
Postgraduate
Postgraduate
education, or graduate education in North America, involves learning and studying for academic or professional degrees, academic or professional certificates, academic or professional diplomas, or other qualifications for which a first or bachelor's degree generally is required, and it is normally considered to be part of higher education. In North America, this level is generally referred to as graduate school (or sometimes colloquially as grad school). The organization and structure of postgraduate education varies in different countries, as well as in different institutions within countries
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Undergraduate Education
Undergraduate education is the post-secondary education previous to the postgraduate education. It includes all the academic programs up to the level of a bachelor's degree. For example, in the United States, an entry level university student is known as an undergraduate, while students of higher degrees are known as graduates
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Singapore
Singapore
Singapore
(/ˈsɪŋ(ɡ)əpɔːr/ ( listen)), officially the Republic
Republic
of Singapore, is a sovereign city-state and island country in Southeast Asia. It lies one degree (137 kilometres or 85 miles) north of the equator, at the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula, with Indonesia's Riau Islands
Riau Islands
to the south and Peninsular Malaysia
Peninsular Malaysia
to the north. Singapore's territory consists of one main island along with 62 other islets
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National Association Of Independent Colleges And Universities
Founded in 1976, the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) is an organization of private US colleges and universities. NAICU has over 1,000 United States
United States
independent higher education institutions. NAICU staff meets with policymakers, helps coordinate the joint activities of state-level private college associations, and advises members of legislative and regulatory developments with potential impact on their institutions. NAICU has three main federal advocacy goals. First, to ensure that federal student aid programs help to provide all Americans with access to the college of their choice. Second, to seek appropriate regulation of private colleges and universities that is sensitive to their diversity and independence while addressing society’s needs
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Financial Endowment
A financial endowment is a donation of money or property to a nonprofit organization for the ongoing support of that organization. Usually the endowment is structured so that the principal amount is kept intact, while the investment income is available for use, or part of the principal is released each year, which allows for their donation to have an impact over a longer period than if it were spent all at once. An endowment may come with stipulations regarding its usage. The total value of an institution's investments is often referred to as the institution's endowment and is typically organized as a public charity, private foundation, or trust
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Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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