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Johnny Tremain
Johnny Tremain
Johnny Tremain
is a 1943 children's fiction historical novel by Esther Forbes set in Boston
Boston
prior to and during the outbreak of the American Revolution. Intended for teen-aged readers, the novel's themes include apprenticeship, courtship, sacrifice, human rights, and the growing tension between Patriots and Loyalists as conflict nears
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Battles Of Lexington And Concord
Strategic American victoryBritish forces succeed in destroying cannon and supplies in Concord Militia
Militia
successfully drive British back to Boston Start of the American Revolutionary WarBelligerents  Massachusetts
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Boston Tea Party
Coordinates: 42°21′13″N 71°03′09″W / 42.3536°N 71.0524°W / 42.3536; -71.0524 ( Boston
Boston
Tea
Tea
Party) Boston
Boston
Tea
Tea
PartyPart of the American RevolutionSource: W.D. Cooper. Boston
Boston
Tea
Tea
Party in The History of North America. London: E. Newberry, 1789. Engraving. Plate opposite p. 58. Rare Book and Special
Special
Collections Division, Library of Congress (40)Date December 16, 1773Location Boston, Province of Massachusetts BayCaused by Tea
Tea
ActGoals To protest British Parliament's tax on tea
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James Otis, Jr.
Oration against British writs of assistance February 5, 1761 which catapulted him into the first ranks of Patriot leaders. The executive Courts must pass such acts into disuse." "A man's house is his castle.... this writ [of assistance] would totally annihilate this privilege. Custom-house officers may enter our houses when they please."Spouse(s) Ruth CunninghamChildren James, Elizabeth Brown Mary LincolnParent(s) James Otis Sr. Mary Allyne Bronze sculpture
Bronze sculpture
of James Otis Jr.
James Otis Jr.
in front of the Barnstable County Courthouse James Otis Jr.
James Otis Jr.
(February 5, 1725 – May 23, 1783) was a lawyer in colonial Massachusetts, a member of the Massachusetts provincial assembly, and an early advocate of the Patriot views against British policy that led to the American Revolution
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Francis Smith (British Army Officer)
American War of IndependenceBattles of Lexington and Concord Siege of Boston Battle of Long Island Battle of Rhode IslandMajor General Francis Smith (1723–1791) was a British army officer. Although Smith had a lengthy and varied career, he is best known as the British commander during most of the Battle of Lexington and Concord, Massachusetts on 19 April 1775. The fighting ignited the American War of Independence that would see Thirteen of Britain's American Colonies to become a separate nation.Contents1 Lexington and Concord1.1 Lexington 1.2 Concord 1.3 Withdrawal2 Siege of Boston 3 New York and Rhode Island 4 Legacy 5 References 6 BibliographyLexington and Concord[edit] Main article: Battles of Lexington and Concord Smith was Lieutenant Colonel of the 10th Regiment of Foot
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John Hancock
John Hancock
John Hancock
(January 23, 1737 [O.S. January 12, 1736] – October 8, 1793) was an American merchant, statesman, and prominent Patriot of the American Revolution. He served as president of the Second Continental Congress
Second Continental Congress
and was the first and third Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. He is remembered for his large and stylish signature on the United States
United States
Declaration of Independence, so much so that the term John Hancock
John Hancock
has become a synonym in the United States
United States
for one's signature.[2] Before the American Revolution, Hancock was one of the wealthiest men in the Thirteen Colonies, having inherited a profitable mercantile business from his uncle
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Samuel Adams
Samuel Adams
Samuel Adams
(September 27 [O.S. September 16] 1722 – October 2, 1803) was an American statesman, political philosopher, and one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. He was a politician in colonial Massachusetts, a leader of the movement that became the American Revolution, and one of the architects of the principles of American republicanism that shaped the political culture of the United States. He was a second cousin to fellow Founding Father, President John Adams. Adams was born in Boston, brought up in a religious and politically active family. A graduate of Harvard College, he was an unsuccessful businessman and tax collector before concentrating on politics
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Rod Cameron (actor)
Rod Cameron (December 7, 1910 – December 21, 1983) was a Canadian-born film and television actor whose career extended from the 1930s to the 1970s. He appeared in horror, war, action and science fiction movies, but is best remembered for his many westerns.[2]Contents1 Early years 2 Films 3 Television 4 Personal life 5 Quote 6 Selected filmography 7 References 8 External linksEarly years[edit] Cameron was born Nathan Roderick Cox in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, and grew up in New Jersey. He played on his high school basketball team and on a semi-professional football team
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Walt Disney Pictures
Walt Disney
Walt Disney
Pictures, Inc. is an American film production company and a subsidiary of Walt Disney
Walt Disney
Studios, owned by The Walt Disney
Walt Disney
Company. The division is the main producer of live-action feature films within the Walt Disney
Walt Disney
Studios unit, and is based at the Walt Disney
Walt Disney
Studios in Burbank, California. It took on its current name in 1983
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Publishers Weekly
Publishers Weekly
Publishers Weekly
(PW) is an American weekly trade news magazine targeted at publishers, librarians, booksellers and literary agents. Published continuously since 1872, it has carried the tagline, “The International News Magazine of Book
Book
Publishing
Publishing
and Bookselling". With 51 issues a year, the emphasis today is on book reviews.[3] The magazine was founded by bibliographer Frederick Leypoldt in the late 1860s, and had various titles until Leypoldt settled on the name The Publishers' Weekly (with an apostrophe) in 1872. The publication was a compilation of information about newly published books, collected from publishers and from other sources by Leypoldt, for an audience of booksellers. By 1876, Publishers Weekly
Publishers Weekly
was being read by nine tenths of the booksellers in the country
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Josiah Quincy II
Josiah Quincy II
Josiah Quincy II
(/ˈkwɪnzi/; February 23, 1744 – April 26, 1775) was an American lawyer and patriot. He was a principal spokesman for the Sons of Liberty in Boston
Boston
prior to the Revolution and was John Adams' co-counsel during the trials of Captain Thomas Preston and the soldiers involved in the Boston
Boston
Massacre.Contents1 Family 2 Life 3 See also 4 ReferencesFamily[edit] Quincy was the son of Col. Josiah Quincy I and the father of the Harvard
Harvard
president and Boston
Boston
mayor Josiah Quincy III. He was a descendant of Edmund Quincy, who emigrated to Massachusetts in 1633. His first cousin once removed was Dorothy Quincy, wife of Governor John Hancock
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Benjamin Church (physician)
Dr. Benjamin Church (August 24, 1734 – 1778) was effectively the first Surgeon General of the United States Army, serving as the "Chief Physician & Director General" of the Medical Service of the Continental Army
Continental Army
from July 27, 1775 to October 17, 1775. He was also active in Boston's Sons of Liberty
Sons of Liberty
movement in the years before the war
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Kirkus Reviews
Kirkus Reviews
Kirkus Reviews
(or Kirkus Media) is an American book review magazine founded in 1933 by Virginia Kirkus
Virginia Kirkus
(1893–1980).[1] The magazine is headquartered in New York City.[2]Contents1 Overview 2 History 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksOverview[edit] Kirkus Reviews, published on the first and 15th of each month, previews books before their publication. Kirkus reviews over 7,000 titles per year.[1][3] In 2014, Kirkus Reviews
Kirkus Reviews
started the Kirkus Prize. It is one of the richest literary awards in the world, bestowing $50,000 prizes annually to authors of fiction, nonfiction, and young readers’ literature.[4] Kirkus launched a fee-for-review program in 2005, originally called Kirkus Discoveries and now called Kirkus Indie
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Port Of Boston
The Port
Port
of Boston, (AMS Seaport
Seaport
Code: 0401,[2] UN/LOCODE: US BOS), is a major seaport located in Boston
Boston
Harbor
Harbor
and adjacent to the City of Boston.[3] It is the largest port in Massachusetts
Massachusetts
as well as being one of the principal ports on the east coast of the United States.[1] The Port
Port
of Boston
Boston
was historically important for the growth of the City of Boston, and was originally located in what is now the downtown area of the city, called Long Wharf. Land reclamation
Land reclamation
and conversion to other uses means that the downtown area no longer handles commercial traffic, although there is still considerable ferry and leisure usage at Long Wharf
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Blockade
A blockade is an effort to cut off supplies, war material or communications from a particular area by force, either in part or totally. A blockade should not be confused with an embargo or sanctions, which are legal barriers to trade. It is also distinct from a siege in that a blockade is usually directed at an entire country or region, rather than a fortress or city. While most blockades historically took place at sea, blockade is still used on land to prevent someone coming into a certain area. A blockading power can seek to cut off all maritime transport from and to the blockaded country; although stopping all land transport to and from an area may also be considered a blockade. Blockades restrict the trading rights of neutrals, who must submit for inspection for contraband, which the blockading power may define narrowly or broadly, sometimes including food and medicine
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Loyalist (American Revolution)
Loyalists were American colonists who remained loyal to the British Crown during the American Revolutionary War. At the time they were often called Tories, Royalists, or King's Men. They were opposed by the Patriots, those who supported the revolution and called them "persons inimical to the liberties of America".[1] Prominent Loyalists repeatedly assured the British government that many thousands of loyalists would spring to arms and fight for the crown. The British government acted in expectation of that, especially in the southern campaigns in 1780-81. In practice, the number of loyalists in military service was far lower than expected. Across the colonies, Patriots watched suspected Loyalists very closely, and would not tolerate any organized Loyalist opposition. Many outspoken or militarily active loyalists were forced to flee, especially to their stronghold of New York City
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