HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

John Narborough
Rear-Admiral
Rear-Admiral
SIR JOHN NARBOROUGH (c. 1640–1688) or Narbrough was an English naval commander of the 17th century. He served with distinction during the Anglo-Dutch Wars and against the Barbary Coast pirates. CONTENTS * 1 Early life * 2 Career * 3 Memorials * 4 References * 5 External links EARLY LIFEHe was descended from an old Norfolk
Norfolk
family and married Elizabeth Hill, with whom he had two surviving sons. Her father was John Hill, a Commissioner of the Navy
Navy
. After her husband's death, Lady Narborough married Admiral Sir Cloudesley Shovell
Cloudesley Shovell
. CAREERHe received his commission in 1664, and in 1666 was promoted lieutenant for gallantry in the action with the Dutch fleet off the Downs in June of that year. After the peace he was chosen to conduct a voyage of exploration in the South Seas
[...More...]

"John Narborough" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Knowlton, Kent
KNOWLTON was an eccesiastical and civil parish ; the former was abolished in 1940 , the latter in 1935 , and the hamlet is now part of Goodnestone civil parish. It is located about 10 miles (16 km) north of Dover in Kent
Kent
, England
England
. Knowlton Hall, set in 200 acres (81 ha) of parkland, is located here. The Church of St Clement is now redundant and in the care of the Churches Conservation Trust
Churches Conservation Trust
, and is open daily. KNOWLTON is a thankful village , in that it did not lose anyone in World War I
World War I

[...More...]

"Knowlton, Kent" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Geographic Coordinate System
A GEOGRAPHIC COORDINATE SYSTEM is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position , and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position . A common choice of coordinates is latitude , longitude and elevation . To specify a location on a two-dimensional map requires a map projection
[...More...]

"Geographic Coordinate System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Battle Of Sole Bay
Upper Rhine * Sinsheim * Entzheim * Mulhouse * Turckheim * Salzbach * Konzer Brücke * Philippsburg -------------------------Franche-Comté * Besançon -------------------------Brandenburg * Fehrbellin -------------------------Pyrenees * Maureillas -------------------------Americas * Martinique * Acadia -------------------------Naval battles * Solebay * Schooneveld * Texel * Stromboli * Augusta * Palermo * Tobago * v * t * e Third Anglo-Dutch War * Solebay * Schooneveld * Texel The naval BATTLE OF SOLEBAY took place on 28 May Old Style
Old Style
, 7 June New Style 1672 and was the first naval battle of the Third Anglo-Dutch War . The battle ended inconclusively, with both sides claiming victory
[...More...]

"Battle Of Sole Bay" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rear-Admiral
REAR ADMIRAL is a naval commissioned officer rank above that of a commodore and captain , and below that of a vice admiral . It is generally regarded as the lowest of the "admiral " ranks, which are also sometimes referred to as "flag officers " or "flag ranks". In many navies it is referred to as a two-star rank (OF-7). It originated from the days of naval sailing squadrons and can trace its origins to the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
. Each naval squadron would be assigned an admiral as its head, who would command from the centre vessel and direct the activities of the squadron. The admiral would in turn be assisted by a vice admiral, who commanded the lead ships which would bear the brunt of a naval battle. In the rear of the naval squadron, a third admiral would command the remaining ships and, as this section of the squadron was considered to be in the least danger, the admiral in command of the rear would typically be the most junior of the squadron admirals
[...More...]

"Rear-Admiral" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

England
ENGLAND is a country that is part of the United Kingdom . It shares land borders with Scotland to the north and Wales to the west. The Irish Sea lies northwest of England and the Celtic Sea lies to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain (which lies in the North Atlantic ) in its centre and south; and includes over 100 smaller islands such as the Isles of Scilly , and the Isle of Wight . The area now called England was first inhabited by modern humans during the Upper Palaeolithic period, but takes its name from the Angles , one of the Germanic tribes who settled during the 5th and 6th centuries
[...More...]

"England" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Navy
A NAVY or MARITIME FORCE is a fleet of waterborne military vessels (watercraft ) and its associated naval aviation , both sea-based and land-based. It is the branch of a nation's armed forces principally designated for naval and amphibious warfare ; namely, lake -borne, riverine , littoral , or ocean -borne combat operations and related functions. It includes anything conducted by surface ships , amphibious ships, submarines , and seaborne aviation , as well as ancillary support, communications, training, and other fields; recent developments have included space -related operations. The strategic offensive role of a navy is projection of force into areas beyond a country's shores (for example, to protect sea-lanes, ferry troops, or attack other navies, ports, or shore installations). The strategic defensive purpose of a navy is to frustrate seaborne projection-of-force by enemies
[...More...]

"Navy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Commander
COMMANDER is a common naval and air force officer rank . Commander
Commander
is also used as a rank or title in other formal organisations, including several police forces. Commander
Commander
is also a generic term for an officer commanding any armed forces unit, for example "platoon commander", "brigade commander" and "squadron commander". In the police, terms such as "borough commander" and "incident commander" are used
[...More...]

"Commander" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Anglo-Dutch Wars
The ANGLO-DUTCH WARS (Dutch : Engels–Nederlandse Oorlogen or Engelse Zeeoorlogen) were a series of conflicts fought, on one side, by the Dutch States (the Dutch Republic , later the Batavian Republic ) and, on the other side, first by England (the Commonwealth of England and then the Kingdom of England ) and later by the Kingdom of Great Britain /the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland . They were predominantly fought in the second half of the 17th century, mainly over trade and overseas colonies . Almost all the battles were fought at sea. Overall, the Dutch were the victors of the three wars fought between 1652 and 1674 — the English had to wait until the Glorious Revolution of 1688 for their fortunes to begin to eclipse those of the Dutch (though since England was thenceforth ruled by a Dutch prince who arrived with 17,000 men, the outcome is capable of more than one interpretation)
[...More...]

"Anglo-Dutch Wars" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Norfolk
NORFOLK (/ˈnɔːrfək/ ) is a county in East Anglia in England . It borders Lincolnshire to the west and north-west, Cambridgeshire to the west and southwest, and Suffolk to the south. Its northern and eastern boundaries are the North Sea and, to the north-west, The Wash . The county town is Norwich . With an area of 2,074 square miles (5,370 km2) and a population of 859,400, Norfolk is a largely rural county with a population density of 401 per square mile (155 per km²). Of the county's population, 40% live in four major built up areas: Norwich (213,000), Great Yarmouth (63,000), King\'s Lynn (46,000) and Thetford (25,000). The Broads is a network of rivers and lakes in the east of the county, extending south into Suffolk . The area is not a National Park although it is marketed as such
[...More...]

"Norfolk" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Navy Board
The NAVY BOARD also known as the NAVY OFFICE and formerly known as the COUNCIL OF THE MARINE or COUNCIL OF THE MARINE CAUSES was the organisation with responsibility for day-to-day civil administration of the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
between 1546 and 1832. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Duties and responsibilities * 3 Subsidiary boards * 4 Principal Officers and Commissioners * 4.1 Tudor and Stuart period * 4.2 Commonwealth and Restoration period * 4.3 Hanoverian period * 5 Headquarters * 6 Demise * 7 Notes * 8 References * 9 Sources * 10 External links HISTORYThe origins of the Navy Board
Navy Board
first began to appear in the 15th century when the Keeper of the Kings or Clerk of the Kings Ships in (1414) the predecessor then later subordinate office of the Lord Admiral of England was joined by a Keeper of the Kings Storehouses in (1514)
[...More...]

"Navy Board" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cloudesley Shovell
Admiral
Admiral
of the Fleet SIR CLOUDESLEY SHOVELL (c. November 1650 – 22 October or 23 October 1707), was an English naval officer. As a junior officer he saw action at the Battle of Solebay and then at the Battle of Texel during the Third Anglo-Dutch War . As a captain he fought at the Battle of Bantry Bay during the Williamite War in Ireland . As a flag officer Shovell commanded a division at the Battle of Barfleur during the Nine Years\' War and during the battle distinguished himself by being the first to break through the enemy's line. Along with Admiral
Admiral
Henry Killigrew and Admiral
Admiral
Ralph Delaval , Shovell was put in joint command of the fleet shortly afterwards
[...More...]

"Cloudesley Shovell" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Pacific Ocean
The PACIFIC OCEAN is the largest and deepest of Earth 's oceanic divisions. It extends from the Arctic Ocean in the north to the Southern Ocean (or, depending on definition, to Antarctica ) in the south and is bounded by Asia and Australia in the west and the Americas in the east. At 165,250,000 square kilometers (63,800,000 square miles) in area, this largest division of the World Ocean —and, in turn, the hydrosphere —covers about 46% of Earth's water surface and about one-third of its total surface area, making it larger than all of Earth's land area combined. The equator subdivides it into the NORTH PACIFIC OCEAN and SOUTH PACIFIC OCEAN, with two exceptions: the Galápagos and Gilbert Islands , while straddling the equator, are deemed wholly within the South Pacific
[...More...]

"Pacific Ocean" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Deptford
DEPTFORD (/ˈdɛtfəd/ _DET-ford_ ) is a district of south-east London , England, within the London Borough of Lewisham . From the mid-16th to the late 19th century, Deptford was home to Deptford Dockyard , the first Royal Navy Dockyard . The area declined as the Royal Navy moved out and commercial docks shut; the last dock, Convoys Wharf , closed in 2000. Historically a part of Kent , Deptford became a Metropolitan Borough in 1900. This became part of Inner London in 1965, within the newly created county of Greater London
[...More...]

"Deptford" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Straits Of Magellan
The STRAIT OF MAGELLAN (Spanish : Estrecho de Magallanes), also called the Straits of Magellan, is a navigable sea route separating mainland South America
South America
to the north and Tierra del Fuego
Tierra del Fuego
to the south. The strait is the most important natural passage between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. It is considered a difficult route to navigate due to the narrowness of the passage and unpredictable winds and currents. It is shorter and more sheltered than the often stormy Drake Passage
Drake Passage
. Along with the narrow and sometimes treacherous Beagle Channel
Beagle Channel
, these were the only three sea routes between these two oceans until the construction of the Panama Canal
[...More...]

"Straits Of Magellan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo