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John Mayer
John Clayton Mayer[1] (/ˈmeɪ.ər/; born October 16, 1977) is an American singer-songwriter, guitarist, and producer.[2] He was born in Bridgeport, Connecticut, and raised in nearby Fairfield. He attended Berklee College of Music
Berklee College of Music
in Boston, but disenrolled and moved to Atlanta
Atlanta
in 1997 with Clay Cook. Together, they formed a short-lived two-man band called Lo-Fi Masters. After their split, Mayer continued to play local clubs—refining his skills and gaining a following. After his appearance at the 2001 South by Southwest
South by Southwest
Festival, he was signed to Aware Records, and then Columbia Records, which released his first EP, Inside Wants Out. His following two full-length albums— Room for Squares
Room for Squares
(2001) and Heavier Things
Heavier Things
(2003)—did well commercially, achieving multi-platinum status
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Granuloma
Granuloma
Granuloma
is an inflammation found in many diseases. It is a collection of immune cells known as histiocytes (macrophages).[1] Granulomas form when the immune system attempts to wall off substances it perceives as foreign but is unable to eliminate
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Esquire (magazine)
Esquire is an American men's magazine, published by the Hearst Corporation in the United States. Founded in 1933, it flourished during the Great Depression
Great Depression
under the guidance of founders Arnold Gingrich, David A. Smart and Henry L. Jackson.Contents1 History 2 Blog 3 Fiction 4 The Napkin Fiction Project 5 Dubious Achievement Awards 6 Sexiest Woman Alive 7 Awards and honors7.1 2000–present8 International editions 9 See also 10 References 11 External linksHistory[edit] Esquire was first issued in October 1933.[2] The magazine was first headquartered in Chicago and then, in New York City.[3] It was founded and edited by David A. Smart, Henry L. Jackson and Arnold Gingrich.[4] Jackson died in the crash of United Airlines Flight 624
United Airlines Flight 624
in 1948, while Gingrich led the magazine until his own death in 1976
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B. B. King
Riley B. King (September 16, 1925 – May 14, 2015), known professionally as B.B. King, was an American blues singer, electric guitarist, songwriter, and record producer
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Music Recording Sales Certification
Music recording sales certification is a system of certifying that a music recording has shipped or sold a certain number of copies
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Bridgeport, Connecticut
Bridgeport is a historic seaport city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Connecticut. The largest city in the state, it is located in Fairfield County at the mouth of the Pequonnock River
Pequonnock River
on Long Island
Long Island
Sound. As of 2017, Bridgeport had an estimated population of 151,267,[4] making it also the 5th-most populous in New England[5] Located 60 miles from Manhattan
Manhattan
and 40 miles from the Bronx, it is bordered by the towns of Trumbull to the north, Fairfield to the west, and Stratford to the east. The Greater Bridgeport
Greater Bridgeport
area is the 48th-largest urban area in the United States. Bridgeport was inhabited by the Paugussett
Paugussett
Indian tribe at the time of its English colonization. The English farming community became a center of trade, shipbuilding, and whaling
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Comedy
In a modern sense, comedy (from the Greek: κωμῳδία, kōmōidía) refers to any discourse or work generally intended to be humorous or amusing by inducing laughter, especially in theatre, television, film, stand-up comedy, or any other medium of entertainment. The origins of the term are found in Ancient Greece. In the Athenian democracy, the public opinion of voters was influenced by the political satire performed by the comic poets at the theaters.[1] The theatrical genre of Greek comedy can be described as a dramatic performance which pits two groups or societies against each other in an amusing agon or conflict. Northrop Frye
Northrop Frye
depicted these two opposing sides as a "Society of Youth" and a "Society of the Old".[2] A revised view characterizes the essential agon of comedy as a struggle between a relatively powerless youth and the societal conventions that pose obstacles to his hopes
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Extended Play
An extended play record, often referred to as an EP, is a musical recording that contains more tracks than a single, but is usually unqualified as an album or LP.[1][2][3] EPs generally do not contain as many tracks as albums, and are considered "less expensive and time-consuming" for an artist to produce than an album.[3] An EP originally referred to specific types of vinyl records other than 78 rpm standard play (SP) and LP,[4] but it is now applied to mid-length CDs and downloads as well. Ricardo Baca
Ricardo Baca
of
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South By Southwest Festival
The points of the compass mark the divisions on a compass, which is primarily divided into four points: north, south, east, and west. These cardinal directions are further subdivided by the addition of the four intercardinal (or ordinal) directions—northeast (NE), southeast (SE), southwest (SW), and northwest (NW)—to indicate the eight principal winds. In meteorological usage, further intermediate points between cardinal and ordinal points, such as north-northeast (NNE) are added to give the 16 points of a wind compass.[1]32-point compass roseAt the most complete division are the full thirty-two points of the mariner's compass,[2] which adds points such as north by east (NbE) between north and north-northeast, and northeast by north (NEbN) between north-northeast and northeast
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Atlanta
Atlanta
Atlanta
(/ætˈlæntə/) is the capital and most populous city of the state of Georgia in the United States. With an estimated 2016 population of 472,522,[12] it is the cultural and economic center of the Atlanta
Atlanta
metropolitan area, home to 5.8 million people and the ninth-largest metropolitan area in the United States.[6] Atlanta
Atlanta
is the seat of Fulton County and a small portion of the city extends eastward into DeKalb County. Atlanta
Atlanta
was founded as a transportation hub at the intersection of two railroad lines in 1837. After being mostly burned to the ground during the American Civil War, the city rose from its ashes to become a national center of commerce and the unofficial capital of the "New South". During the 1960s, Atlanta
Atlanta
became a major organizing center of the civil rights movement, with Dr
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Boston
Boston
Boston
(/ˈbɒstən/ ( listen) BOS-tən) is the capital city and most populous municipality[9] of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in the United States
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Columnist
A columnist is a person who writes for publication in a series, creating an article that usually offers commentary and opinions. Columns appear in newspapers, magazines and other publications, including blogs. They take the form of a short essay by a specific writer who offers a personal point of view. In some instances, a column has been written by a composite or a team, appearing under a pseudonym, or (in effect) a brand name
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Berklee College Of Music
Berklee College of Music, located in Boston, Massachusetts, United States, is the largest independent college of contemporary music in the world
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Soul Music
Soul music
Soul music
(often referred to simply as soul) is a popular music genre that originated in the United States in the late 1950s and early 1960s. It combines elements of African-American gospel music, rhythm and blues and jazz
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Country Music
Country music
Country music
(/ˈkʌntri/), also known as country and western or simply country, is a genre of popular music that originated in the southern United States in the early 1920s.[1] It takes its roots from genres such as folk music (especially Appalachian folk music) and blues. Country music
Country music
often consists of ballads and dance tunes with generally simple forms, folk lyric and harmonies accompanied by mostly string instruments such as banjos, electric and acoustic guitars, steel guitars (such as pedal steels and dobros), and fiddles as well as harmonicas.[2][3][4] Blues
Blues
modes have been used extensively throughout its recorded history.[5] According to Lindsey Starnes, the term country music gained popularity in the 1940s in preference to the earlier term hillbilly music; it came to encompass Western music, which evolved parallel to hillbilly music from similar roots, in the mid-20th century
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Folk Music
Folk music
Folk music
includes both traditional music and the genre that evolved from it during the 20th century folk revival. The term originated in the 19th century, but is often applied to music older than that. Some types of folk music are also called world music. Traditional folk music has been defined in several ways: as music transmitted orally, music with unknown composers, or music performed by custom over a long period of time. It has been contrasted with commercial and classical styles. Starting in the mid-20th century, a new form of popular folk music evolved from traditional folk music. This process and period is called the (second) folk revival and reached a zenith in the 1960s
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