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John Marshall Harlan II
John Marshall Harlan
John Marshall Harlan
(May 20, 1899 – December 29, 1971) was an American jurist who served as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court from 1955 to 1971. His namesake was his grandfather John Marshall Harlan, another associate justice who served from 1877 to 1911. Harlan was a student at Upper Canada College
Upper Canada College
and Appleby College
Appleby College
and then at Princeton University. Awarded a Rhodes Scholarship, he studied law at Balliol College, Oxford.[2] Upon his return to the U.S. in 1923 Harlan worked in the law firm of Root, Clark, Buckner & Howland while studying at New York Law School. Later he served as Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
and as Special Assistant Attorney General of New York
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Borough President
A borough president is an elective office in each of the five boroughs of New York City. For most of the city's history, the office contained significant executive powers within each borough, and the five presidents also comprised a majority of the New York City
New York City
Board of Estimate, the upper house of the New York City
New York City
legislature. Since 1990, the borough presidents were stripped of a majority of their powers in the New York City
New York City
government and now generally serve as ceremonial leaders. Borough presidents advise the Mayor, comment on land-use items in their borough, advocate borough needs in the annual municipal budget process, appoint and chair community boards, and serve as ex officio members of various other boards and committees
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Greater Toronto Area
The Greater Toronto
Toronto
Area (GTA) is the most populous metropolitan area in Canada
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U.S. Bill Of Rights
The Bill of Rights is the first ten amendments to the United States Constitution.[1] Proposed following the often bitter 1787–88 battle over ratification of the U.S. Constitution, and crafted to address the objections raised by Anti-Federalists, the Bill of Rights amendments add to the Constitution specific guarantees of personal freedoms and rights, clear limitations on the government's power in judicial and other proceedings, and explicit declarations that all powers not specifically delegated to Congress by the Constitution are reserved for the states or the people
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Judicial Interpretation
Judicial interpretation refers to different ways that the judiciary uses to interpret the law, particularly constitutional documents and legislation. This is an important issue in some common law jurisdictions such as the United States, Australia and Canada, because the supreme courts of those nations can overturn laws made by their legislatures via a process called judicial review. For example, the United States
United States
Supreme Court has decided such topics as the legality of slavery as in the Dred Scott decision, and desegregation as in the Brown v Board of Education
Brown v Board of Education
decision, and abortion rights as in the Roe v Wade
Roe v Wade
decision. As a result, how justices interpret the constitution, and the ways in which they approach this task has a political aspect
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United States Constitution
House of RepresentativesSpeaker Paul Ryan
Paul Ryan
(R)Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R)Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi
Nancy Pelosi
(D)Co
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Dissenting Opinion
A dissenting opinion (or dissent) is an opinion in a legal case in certain legal systems written by one or more judges expressing disagreement with the majority opinion of the court which gives rise to its judgment. When not necessarily referring to a legal decision, this can also be referred to as a minority report.[1][2] Dissenting opinions are normally written at the same time as the majority opinion and any concurring opinions, and are also delivered and published at the same time. A dissenting opinion does not create binding precedent nor does it become a part of case law. However, they can sometimes be cited as a form of persuasive authority in subsequent cases when arguing that the court's holding should be limited or overturned. In some cases, a previous dissent is used to spur a change in the law, and a later case may result in a majority opinion adopting a particular rule of law formerly advocated in dissent
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Spinal Tumor
Spinal tumors are neoplasms located in the spinal cord. Extradural tumors are more common than intradural neoplasms. Depending on their location, the spinal cord tumors can be:Extradural - outside the dura mater lining (most common) Intradural - part of the duraIntramedullary - inside the spinal cord Extramedullary- inside the dura, but outside the spinal cordContents1 Symptoms 2 Pathology 3 Diagnosis 4 Treatment 5 References 6 External linksSymptoms[edit] Pain is the most common symptom at presentation.[1] The symptoms seen are due to spinal nerve compression and weakening of the vertebral structure. Incontinence and decreased sensitivity in the saddle area (buttocks) are generally considered warning signs of spinal cord compression by the tumor. Other symptoms of spinal cord compression include lower extremity weakness, sensory loss, numbness in hands and legs and rapid onset paralysis
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Richard Nixon
Vice President of the United StatesMotorcade attack Kitchen Debate Operation 40 1960 presidential electionPost-vice presidency1962 gubernatorial bid "Last press conference"President of the United StatesPresidencyFirst term1968 presidential electioncampaign1st InaugurationNixon Doctrine War policy Visit to ChinaNixonomicsNixon shockEPA Environmental policy Clean Water NOAA War on Cancer War on DrugsSecond term1972 presidential electionConvention2nd InaugurationDétente Paris Peace Accords Endangered Species Act Watergate scandalTimeline Tapes United States
United States
v. NixonWatergate Committee Impeachment
Impeachment
processSpeechPost-presidencyPardon The Nixon Interviews Nixon v
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Puerto Rico
Coordinates: 18°12′N 66°30′W / 18.2°N 66.5°W / 18.2; -66.5Commonwealth of Puerto Rico Estado Libre Asociado de Puerto Rico  (Spanish)FlagCoat of armsMotto: "Joannes est nomen ejus" (Latin) "John is his name"Anthem: "La Borinqueña"[a] "The Borinquenian""The Star-Spangled Banner"Great SealStatus Unincorporated territoryCapital and largest city San Juan 18°27′N 66°6′W / 18.450°N 66.100°W / 18.450; -66.100Official languages Spanish English[1]Common languages94.7% Spanish[2]5.3% EnglishEthnic groups75.8% White12.4% Black3.3% Two or more races0.5% American Indian & Alaskan Native0.2% Asian<0.1% Pacific Islander7.8% Other[3]DemonymPuerto Rican (formal) American (since 1917) Boricua (colloquial)Country  United StatesGovernment Commonwealth[b
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LL.B.
The Bachelor of Laws
Bachelor of Laws
(Latin: Legum nrm Baccalaureus; LL.B. or B.L.) is an undergraduate degree in law (or a first professional degree in law, depending on jurisdiction) originating in England
England
and offered in Japan and most common law jurisdictions—except the United States and Canada—as the degree which allows a person to become a lawyer.[1] It historically served this purpose in the U.S. as well, but was phased out in the mid-1960s in favor of the Juris Doctor
Juris Doctor
degree, and Canada followed suit. Historically, in Canada, Bachelor of Laws
Bachelor of Laws
was the name of the first degree in common law, but is also the name of the first degree in Quebec civil law awarded by a number of Quebec universities. Canadian common-law LL.B. programmes were, in practice, second-entry professional degrees, meaning that the vast majority of those admitted to an LL.B
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Rhodes Scholarship
The Rhodes Scholarship, named after the Anglo-South African mining magnate and politician Cecil John Rhodes, is an international postgraduate award for students to study at the University of Oxford.[1] It is widely considered to be one of the world's most prestigious scholarships.[2] Established in 1902, it was the first large-scale programme of international scholarships,[3] inspiring the creation of a great many other awards across the globe (such as the Fulbright
Fulbright
program, Marshall Scholarship, and the Gates Cambridge Scholarship). As elaborated on in his will, Cecil Rhodes' go
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U.S. Attorney
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin)
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Southern District Of New York
The United States District Court for the Southern District of New York (in case citations, S.D.N.Y.) is a federal district court. Appeals from the Southern District of New York are taken to the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit (except for patent claims and claims against the U.S. government under the Tucker Act, which are appealed to the Federal Circuit). The Southern District is one of the most influential and active federal district courts in the United States, largely because of its jurisdiction over New York's major financial centers. On March 12, 2015 Michael Greco was confirmed as U.S
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Prohibition
Prohibition
Prohibition
is the illegality of the manufacturing, storage in barrels or bottles, transportation, sale, possession, and consumption of alcohol including alcoholic beverages, or a period of time during which such illegality was enforced
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Harry M. Daugherty
Harry Micajah Daugherty (/ˈdoʊ.ərti/; January 26, 1860 – October 21, 1941) was an American politician. A key Ohio
Ohio
Republican political insider, Daugherty is best remembered for his service as Attorney General of the United States under Presidents Warren G. Harding
Warren G. Harding
and Calvin Coolidge. Despite his status as a key political leader of the Ohio
Ohio
Republican Party from the 1880s through the first decade of the 20th Century, Daugherty was himself only briefly a statewide elected politician, serving just two terms in the Ohio
Ohio
General Assembly, working closely during the last two years with Governor William McKinley. Although he sought national office several times, Daugherty was thwarted in his effort to obtain the nomination of his party and was never elected to office again. Daugherty remained an influential figure behind the election of several Congressmen and U.S
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