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John Julius Angerstein
The gens Julia or Iulia was one of the most ancient patrician families at Ancient Rome. Members of the gens attained the highest dignities of the state in the earliest times of the Republic. The first of the family to obtain the consulship was Gaius Julius Iulus in 489 BC. The gens is perhaps best known, however, for Gaius Julius Caesar, the dictator, and grand uncle of the emperor Augustus, through whom the name was passed to the so-called Julio-Claudian dynasty
Julio-Claudian dynasty
of the 1st century AD
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Julius (other)
Julius
Julius
is the name of a Roman family, most famously the dictator Gaius Julius
Julius
Caesar
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Praenomen
The praenomen (Classical Latin: [ˈprae̯:.noː.mɛn]; plural: praenomina) was a personal name chosen by the parents of a Roman child. It was first bestowed on the dies lustricus (day of lustration), the eighth day after the birth of a girl, or the ninth day after the birth of a boy. The praenomen would then be formally conferred a second time when girls married, or when boys assumed the toga virilis upon reaching manhood. Although it was the oldest of the tria nomina commonly used in Roman naming conventions, by the late republic, most praenomina were so common that most people were called by their praenomina only by family or close friends. For this reason, although they continued to be used, praenomina gradually disappeared from public records during imperial times
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Quaestor
A quaestor (UK: /ˈkwiːstər/, US: /ˈkwɛstər/, Latin for investigator)[1] was a public official in Ancient Rome. The position served different functions depending on the period. In the Roman Kingdom, quaestores parricidii (quaestors with judicial powers) were appointed by the king to investigate and handle murders. In the Roman Republic, quaestors (Lat. quaestores) were elected officials that supervised the state treasury and conducted audits. It was the lowest ranking position in the cursus honorum (course of offices). However, this means that in the political environment of Rome, it was quite common for many aspiring politicians to take the position of quaestor as an early rung on the political ladder
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Julia (wife Of Marius)
OF or Of may refer to:Air Finland, a defunct Finnish airline (IATA airline code OF) Mass of Paul VI, or Ordinary Form, in Roman Catholicism Of, Turkey, a town and district in Trabzon Province, Turkey Offenbach (district), German vehicle registration plate code OF Old French, a dialect continuum spoken from the 9th century to the 14th century Open Firmware, computer software which loads an operating system Order of Fiji, which has the post-nominal letters of OF Outfielder, a defensive position in baseball Oxygen fluoride, a compound containing only the chemical elements oxygen and fluorine Občanské fórum, or Civic Forum, a Czech political movement in 1989 Osvobodilna fronta, the Liberation Front of the Slovenian PeopleThis disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title OF. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the
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Battle Of Pharsalus
The Battle of Pharsalus
Pharsalus
was a decisive battle of Caesar's Civil War. On 9 August 48 BC at Pharsalus
Pharsalus
in central Greece, Gaius Julius Caesar and his allies formed up opposite the army of the republic under the command of Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus (" Pompey
Pompey
the Great"). Pompey
Pompey
had the backing of a majority of the senators, of whom many were optimates, and his army significantly outnumbered the veteran Caesarian legions. The two armies confronted each other over several months of uncertainty, Caesar being in a much weaker position than Pompey
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Battle Of Munda
The Battle of Munda
Battle of Munda
(17 March 45 B.C.), in southern Hispania
Hispania
Ulterior, was the final battle of Caesar's civil war
Caesar's civil war
against the leaders of the Optimates. With the military victory at Munda, and the deaths of Titus Labienus and Gnaeus Pompeius (eldest son of Pompey), Caesar was politically able to return in triumph to Rome, and then govern as the elected Roman dictator
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Romulus
Romulus
Romulus
(/ˈrɒmjələs/) was the legendary founder and first king of Rome. Various traditions attribute the establishment of many of Rome's oldest legal, political, religious, and social institutions to Romulus and his contemporaries
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Quirinus
In Roman mythology
Roman mythology
and religion, Quirinus
Quirinus
(/kwɪˈraɪnəs/;[2] Latin: Quirīnus, [kʷɪˈriːnʊs]) is an early god of the Roman state. In Augustan Rome, Quirinus
Quirinus
was also an epithet of Janus, as Janus Quirinus.[3] His name may be derived from the Sabine word quiris "spear".Contents1 Etymology 2 History 3 Depiction 4 Festivals 5 Legacy 6 See also 7 Notes 8 ReferencesEtymology[edit] Quirinus
Quirinus
is probably an adjective meaning "wielder of the spear" (Quiris, in the Sabine language, cf. Janus
Janus
Quirinus). Other suggested etymologies are: (i) from the Sabine town Cures; (2) from curia, i.e. he was the god of the Roman state as represented by the thirty curies, first proposed by Krestchmer. A. B. Cook (Class. Rev
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Giulio
Giulio
Giulio
is a given name
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Jules (other)
Jules
Jules
is the French form of the Latin
Latin
"Julius" (e.g. Jules
Jules
César, the French name for Julius Caesar)
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Iuliu
Iuliu is a Romanian male given name derived from Latin Iulius. The female form is Iulia. In other cases Iuliu is the Romanianized form of the Hungarian name Gyula. People named Iuliu: Iuliu Barasch Iuliu Baratky Iuliu Bodola Iuliu Coroianu Iuliu Haţieganu Iuliu Maniu Iuliu Cezar SăvescuSee also[edit]JuliusThis page or section lists people that share the same given name
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Lucius (praenomen)
Lucius
Lucius
(/ˈluːʃiəs/; Classical Latin: [ˈluːkɪ.ʊs]) is a Latin praenomen, or personal name, which was one of the most common names throughout Roman history. The feminine form is Lucia (/ˈluːʃiə/ or /luːˈtʃiːə/; Classical Latin: [ˈluːkɪ.a]). The praenomen was used by both patrician and plebeian families, and gave rise to the patronymic gentes Lucia and Lucilia, as well as the cognomen Lucullus. It was regularly abbreviated L.[1] Throughout Roman history, Lucius
Lucius
was the most common praenomen, used slightly more than Gaius and somewhat more than Marcus. Although a number of prominent families rarely or never used it, it was amongst the most frequently given names in countless others
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Lavinia
In Roman mythology, Lavinia
Lavinia
(/ləˈvɪniə/; Latin: Lāuīnĭa [laːˈwiːnia]) is the daughter of Latinus
Latinus
and Amata and the last wife of Aeneas. Lavinia, the only child of the king and "ripe for marriage", had been courted by many men who hoped to become the king of Latium. Turnus, ruler of the Rutuli, was the most likely of the suitors, having the favor of Queen Amata. King Latinus
Latinus
is later warned by his father Faunus
Faunus
in a dream oracle that his daughter is not to marry a Latin."Propose no Latin alliance for your daughter, Son of mine; distrust the bridal chamber Now prepared. Men from abroad will come And be your sons by marriage. Blood so mingled Lifts our name starward
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Gaius (praenomen)
Gaius (/ˈɡaɪ.əs/ or /ˈɡeɪ.əs/) is a Latin praenomen, or personal name, which was one of the most common names throughout Roman history. The feminine form is Gaia. The praenomen was used by both patrician and plebeian families, and gave rise to the patronymic gens Gavia. The name was regularly abbreviated C., based on the original spelling of Caius, which dates from the period before the letters "C" and "G" were differentiated.[1][2][3] Throughout Roman history, Gaius was generally the second-most common praenomen, following only Lucius. Although many prominent families did not use it at all, it was so widely distributed amongst all social classes that "Gaius" became a generic name for any man, and "Gaia" for any woman. A familiar Roman wedding ceremony included the words, spoken by the bride, ubi tu Gaius, ego Gaia ("as you are Gaius, I am Gaia"), to which the bridegroom replied, ubi tu Gaia, ego Gaius
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