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John Gast (painter)
American Progress
American Progress
is an 1872 painting by John Gast, a Prussian-born painter, printer, and lithographer who lived and worked most of his life in Brooklyn, New York. American Progress, an allegory of Manifest Destiny, was widely disseminated in chromolithographic prints. It is now held by the Autry Museum of the American West
Autry Museum of the American West
in Los Angeles, California.[1] Other than he painted American Progress, and that he was born December 21, 1842, in Berlin, and died July 26, 1896, in Brooklyn,[2], little else is known about Gast's life. Description[edit] American Progress
American Progress
has become a seminal example of American Western art. The painting serves as an allegory for the Manifest Destiny
Manifest Destiny
and American westward expansion
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American Progress (newspaper)
The American Progress was an American newspaper founded by Democratic Louisiana Governor Huey Long
Huey Long
in March 1930 as the Louisiana Progress to promote his political aims and attack his opponents. He forced state employees to subscribe and distribute copies,[2] plus state agencies had to place ads.[3] The paper was renamed in 1935 and went national to promote then Senator Long's Share Our Wealth program and his ambitions for running for the presidency of the United States in the 1936 election. It was mailed free to his followers and circulation varied from 300,000 to 1.5 million for special issues. The paper was paid for by contributions from the Long political machine in Louisiana.[2] After Long's assassination in 1935, the paper was taken over by Governor Richard W. Leche
Richard W

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Wagon Train
Wagon Train
Wagon Train
is an American Western series that ran on NBC
NBC
1957–62 and then on ABC 1962–65. The series initially starred veteran movie supporting actor Ward Bond
Ward Bond
as the wagon master, later replaced upon his death by John McIntire, and Robert Horton as the scout, subsequently replaced by Scott Miller and Robert Fuller.[citation needed] The series was inspired by the 1950 film Wagon Master
Wagon Master
directed by John Ford and starring Ben Johnson, Harry Carey Jr.
Harry Carey Jr.
and Ward Bond,[1] and harkens back to the early widescreen wagon train epic The Big Trail (1930) starring John Wayne
John Wayne
and featuring Bond in his first major screen appearance playing a supporting role
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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The Significance Of The Frontier In American History
"The Significance of the Frontier
Frontier
in American History" is a seminal essay by the American historian Frederick Jackson Turner which advanced the Frontier Thesis
Frontier Thesis
of American history. It was presented to a special meeting of the American Historical Association
American Historical Association
at the World's Columbian Exposition
World's Columbian Exposition
in Chicago, Illinois
Illinois
in 1893, and published later that year first in Proceedings of the State Historical Society of Wisconsin, then in the Annual Report of the American Historical Association
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Frontier Thesis
The Frontier
Frontier
Thesis or Turner Thesis, is the argument advanced by historian Frederick Jackson Turner in 1893 that American democracy
American democracy
was formed by the American frontier. He stressed the process—the moving frontier line—and the impact it had on pioneers going through the process. He also stressed results; especially that American democracy was the primary result, along with egalitarianism, a lack of interest in high culture, and violence. " American democracy
American democracy
was born of no theorist's dream; it was not carried in the Susan Constant
Susan Constant
to Virginia, nor in the Mayflower
Mayflower
to Plymouth
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American Bison
B. b. athabascae B. b. bisonSynonyms Bos
Bos
americanus Bos
Bos
bison Bison
Bison
americanus Bison
Bison
bison montanaeThe American bison
American bison
or simply bison ( Bison
Bison
bison), also commonly known as the American buffalo or simply buffalo, is a North American species of bison that once roamed the grasslands of North America
North America
in massive herds. They became nearly extinct by a combination of commercial hunting and slaughter in the 19th century and introduction of bovine diseases from domestic cattle, and have made a recent resurgence largely restricted to a few national parks and reserves
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Telegraphy
Telegraphy
Telegraphy
(from Greek: τῆλε têle, "at a distance" and γράφειν gráphein, "to write") is the long-distance transmission of textual or symbolic (as opposed to verbal or audio) messages without the physical exchange of an object bearing the message. Thus semaphore is a method of telegraphy, whereas pigeon post is not. Telegraphy
Telegraphy
requires that the method used for encoding the message be known to both sender and receiver. Many methods are designed according to the limits of the signalling medium used. The use of smoke signals, beacons, reflected light signals, and flag semaphore signals are early examples. In the 19th century, the harnessing of electricity led to the invention of electrical telegraphy. The advent of radio in the early 20th century brought about radiotelegraphy and other forms of wireless telegraphy
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Train
A train is a form of rail transport consisting of a series of connected vehicles that generally runs along a rail track to transport cargo or passengers. Motive power is provided by a separate locomotive or individual motors in self-propelled multiple unit. Although historically steam propulsion dominated, the most common modern forms are diesel and electric locomotives, the latter supplied by overhead wires or additional rails. Other energy sources include horses, engine or water-driven rope or wire winch, gravity, pneumatics, gas turbines and batteries. Train
Train
tracks usually consist of two running rails, sometimes supplemented by additional rails such as electric conducting rails and rack rails, with a limited number of monorails and maglev guideways in the mix.[1] There are various types of trains that are designed for particular purposes
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Conestoga Wagon
The Conestoga wagon
Conestoga wagon
is a heavy, covered wagon that was used extensively during the late eighteenth century, and the nineteenth century, in the eastern United States
United States
and Canada. It was large enough to transport loads up to 6 tons[1][2] (5.4 metric tons), and was drawn by horses, mules, or oxen. It was designed to help keep its contents from moving about when in motion and to aid it in crossing rivers and streams, though it sometimes leaked unless caulked. The term Conestoga wagon
Conestoga wagon
refers specifically to this type of vehicle; it is not a generic term for "covered wagon"
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Prussia
Prussia
Prussia
(/ˈprʌʃə/; German:  Preußen (help·info) [ˈpʁɔʏ̯sən]) was a historically prominent German state that originated in 1525 with a duchy centred on the region of Prussia. It was de facto dissolved by an emergency decree transferring powers of the Prussian government to German Chancellor
German Chancellor
Franz von Papen
Franz von Papen
in 1932 and de jure by an Allied decree in 1947. For centuries, the House of Hohenzollern ruled Prussia, successfully expanding its size by way of an unusually well-organised and effective army. Prussia, with its capital in Königsberg
Königsberg
and from 1701 in Berlin, decisively shaped the history of Germany. In 1871, German states united to create the German Empire
German Empire
under Prussian leadership
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Stagecoach
A stagecoach is a specialized type of four-wheeled closed public coach used to carry passengers and light packages. It is strongly sprung and generally drawn by four horses, usually four-in-hand. Widely used before steam-powered rail transport was available a stagecoach made long scheduled trips using stage stations or posts where the stagecoach's horses would be replaced by fresh horses. The business of running stagecoaches or the act of journeying in them was known as staging.[1] Originating in England, familiar images of the stagecoach are that of a Royal Mail coach
Mail coach
passing through a turnpike gate, a Dickensian passenger coach covered in snow pulling up at a coaching inn, and a highwayman demanding a coach to "stand and deliver"
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Westward Expansion
The United States
United States
of America was created on July 4, 1776, with the declaration of independence of thirteen British colonies. Their independence was recognized by Great Britain with the Treaty of Paris of 1783, following the American Revolutionary War. This effectively doubled the size of the colonies, now able to stretch west past the Proclamation Line to the Mississippi
Mississippi
River
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Berlin
Berlin
Berlin
(/bɜːrˈlɪn/, German: [bɛɐ̯ˈliːn] ( listen)) is the capital and the largest city of Germany, as well as one of its 16 constituent states. With a steadily growing population of approximately 3.7 million,[4] Berlin
Berlin
is the second most populous city proper in the European Union
European Union
behind London
London
and the seventh most populous urban area in the European Union.[5] Located in northeastern Germany
Germany
on the banks of the rivers Spree
Spree
and Havel, it is the centre of the Berlin- Brandenburg
Brandenburg
Metropolitan Region, which has roughly 6 million residents from more than 180 nations.[6][7][8][9] Due to its location in the European Plain, Berlin
Berlin
is influenced by a temperate seasonal climate
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Autry Museum Of The American West
The Autry Museum
Museum
of the American West
American West
is a museum in Los Angeles, California, dedicated to exploring an inclusive history of the American West. Founded in 1988, the museum presents a wide range of exhibitions and public programs, including lectures, film, theater, festivals, family events, and music, and performs scholarship, research, and educational outreach. It has two sites and attracts about 150,000 visitors annually.[1] In 2013, it extensively redesigned and renovated the Irene Helen Jones Parks Gallery of Art and the Gamble Firearms Gallery in its main building
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Brooklyn
Coordinates: 40°41′34″N 73°59′25″W / 40.69278°N 73.99028°W / 40.69278; -73.99028Brooklyn Kings CountyBorough of New York City County of New York StateClockwise from top left: Brooklyn
Brooklyn
Bridge, Brooklyn
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