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John Britten
John Kenton Britten (1 August 1950 – 5 September 1995) was a New Zealand mechanical engineer who designed a world-record-setting motorcycle with innovative features and materials.Contents1 Biography 2 Britten designed 3 Death 4 Motorcycle 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit] John Britten
John Britten
was born to Bruce and Ruvae Britten at Christchurch
Christchurch
at 10 minutes to midnight. His twin sister Marguerite was born just after midnight, so although they were twins they celebrated their birthdays on different dates
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Motorcycle
A motorcycle often called a bike, motorbike, or cycle is a two-[1][2] or three-wheeled[3][4] motor vehicle. Motorcycle design varies greatly to suit a range of different purposes: long distance travel, commuting, cruising, sport including racing, and off-road riding. Motorcycling
Motorcycling
is riding a motorcycle and related social activity such as joining a motorcycle club and attending motorcycle rallies. In 1894, Hildebrand & Wolfmüller became the first series production motorcycle, and the first to be called a motorcycle. In 2014, the three top motorcycle producers globally by volume were Honda, Yamaha
Yamaha
(both from Japan), and Hero MotoCorp
Hero MotoCorp
(India).[5] In developing countries, motorcycles are overwhelmingly utilitarian due to lower prices and greater fuel economy
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Isle Of Man TT
The International Isle of Man
Isle of Man
TT (Tourist Trophy) Race is an annual motorcycle sport event run on the Isle of Man
Isle of Man
in May or June of most years since its inaugural race in 1907.[3] The Isle of Man
Isle of Man
TT has been traditionally run in a time-trial format on public roads closed for racing by the provisions of an Act of Tynwald (the parliament of the Isle of Man). The event consists of one week of practice sessions followed by one week of racing
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Isle Of Man
The Isle of Man
Isle of Man
(Manx: Ellan Vannin [ˈɛlʲən ˈvanɪn]), also known simply as Mann (/mæn/; Manx: Mannin [ˈmanɪn]), is a self-governing British Crown dependency in the Irish Sea
Irish Sea
between the islands of Great Britain and Ireland. The head of state is Queen Elizabeth II, who holds the title of Lord of Mann
Lord of Mann
and is represented by a Lieutenant Governor. Defence is the responsibility of the United Kingdom. Ranked by the World Bank
World Bank
as the 5th richest nation in the world by GDP per capita,[6] the largest sectors are insurance and eGaming with 17% of GNP each, followed by ICT and banking with 9% each.[7] The island has been inhabited since before 6500 BC. Gaelic cultural influence began in the 5th century and the Manx language, a branch of the Gaelic languages, emerged
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Signpost Corner, Isle Of Man
Signpost Corner, Isle of Man
Isle of Man
is a former temporary motor-cycle race signal station, located on the A18 Snaefell Mountain Road with the road junction with the A39 Hillberry Road / B11 Avondale Road in the parish of Onchan
Onchan
in the Isle of Man.Contents1 Origin of Name 2 Bedstead Corner 3 Popular culture 4 Motor-Sport Heritage 5 Road Improvements 6 Sources 7 External linksOrigin of Name[edit] The name derives from a signal station for the Isle of Man
Isle of Man
TT races and Manx Grand Prix. The signal station at Signpost Corner
Signpost Corner
was connected to the Race Scoreboards located in Glencrutchery Road in Douglas by a telephone land-line
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ChristChurch Cathedral, Christchurch
ChristChurch Cathedral, or (rarely) Cathedral Church of Christ,[1] is a deconsecrated Anglican cathedral in the city of Christchurch, New Zealand. It was built between 1864 and 1904 in the centre of the city, surrounded by Cathedral Square. It became the cathedral seat of the Bishop
Bishop
of Christchurch
Christchurch
who is in the New Zealand tikanga of the Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia. Repeated earthquakes have damaged the building (mostly the spire): in 1881, 1888, 1901, 1922, and September 2010. The February 2011 Christchurch
Christchurch
earthquake destroyed the spire and part of the tower, and severely damaged the structure of the remaining building. The remainder of the tower was demolished in March 2012. The west wall suffered collapses in the June 2011 and the December 2011 earthquakes[2] due to a steel structure – intended to stabilise the rose window – pushing it in
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Skin Cancer
Skin
Skin
cancers are cancers that arise from the skin
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Wellington
Wellington
Wellington
(/ˈwɛlɪŋtən/; Māori: Te Whanganui-a-Tara [te ˈfanganʉi a tara]) is the capital city and second most populous urban area of New Zealand, with 412,500 residents.[3] It is located at the south-western tip of the North Island, between Cook Strait
Cook Strait
and the Rimutaka Range
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Museum Of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa
The Museum of New Zealand
New Zealand
Te Papa Tongarewa is New Zealand's national museum, located in Wellington. Known as Te Papa, or "Our Place", it opened in 1998 after the merging of the National Museum and the National Art Gallery.[3] More than 1.5 million people visit every year. Te Papa Tongarewa translates literally to "container of treasures". A fuller interpretation is ‘our container of treasured things and people that spring from mother earth here in New Zealand’. Te Papa's philosophy emphasises the living face behind its cultural treasures, many of which retain deep ancestral links to the indigenous Māori people
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Daytona International Speedway
Daytona International Speedway
Daytona International Speedway
is a race track in Daytona Beach, Florida, United States. Since opening in 1959, it has been the home of the Daytona 500, the most prestigious race in NASCAR. In addition to NASCAR, the track also hosts races of ARCA, AMA Superbike, USCC, SCCA, and Motocross. The track features multiple layouts including the primary 2.5-mile (4.0 km) high-speed tri-oval, a 3.56-mile (5.73 km) sports car course, a 2.95-mile (4.75 km) motorcycle course, and a 1,320-foot (400 m) karting and motorcycle flat-track. The track's 180-acre (73 ha) infield includes the 29-acre (12 ha) Lake Lloyd, which has hosted powerboat racing. The speedway is owned and operated by International Speedway Corporation. The track was built in 1959 by NASCAR
NASCAR
founder William "Bill" France, Sr. to host racing that was held at the former Daytona Beach Road Course
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Composite Material
A composite material (also called a composition material or shortened to composite, which is the common name) is a material made from two or more constituent materials with significantly different physical or chemical properties that, when combined, produce a material with characteristics different from the individual components
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Engineer
Engineers, as practitioners of engineering, are people who invent, design, analyse, build and test machines, systems, structures and materials to fulfill objectives and requirements while considering the limitations imposed by practicality, regulation, safety, and cost.[1][2] The word engineer ( Latin
Latin
ingeniator[3]) is derived from the Latin
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M4 Motorway
The M4 is a motorway which runs between London
London
and South Wales
South Wales
in the United Kingdom. Major towns and cities along the route include Slough, Reading, Swindon, Bristol, Newport, Cardiff
Cardiff
and Swansea. Originally referred to as the London- South Wales
South Wales
Motorway, the English section, including a suspension bridge over the River Severn, was constructed between 1961 and 1971; the Welsh element was completed in 1993. A new Severn bridge, known as the Second Severn Crossing, was opened in 1996 with the M4 rerouted to use it. The M4 runs close to the A4 from London
London
to Bristol. After crossing the River Severn
River Severn
it follows the A48 through South Wales, using the Brynglas Tunnels
Brynglas Tunnels
at Junction 25a, Newport and terminates just north of Pontarddulais
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