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Johannesburg
Johannesburg
Johannesburg
(/dʒoʊˈhænɪsbɜːrɡ/; Afrikaans: [jʊəˈɦanəsbœrχ]; also known as Jozi, Joburg and Egoli) is the largest city in South Africa
South Africa
and is one of the 50 largest urban areas in the world.[8] It is the provincial capital and largest city in Gauteng, which is the wealthiest province in South Africa.[9] While Johannesburg
Johannesburg
is not one of South Africa's three capital cities, it is the seat of the Constitutional Court. The city is located in the mineral-rich Witwatersrand
Witwatersrand
range of hills and is the centre of large-scale gold and diamond trade.[citation needed] The metropolis is an alpha global city as listed by the Globalization and World Cities Research Network
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Indian People
Indians are the people who are the nationals or citizens of India, the second most populous nation containing 17.50%[25] of the world's population. "Indian" refers to nationality, but not ethnicity or language. The Indian nationality consists of many regional ethno-linguistic groups, reflecting the rich and complex history of India. India
India
hosts all major ethnic groups found in the Indian Subcontinent
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Bantu Peoples Of South Africa
Blacks from South Africa
South Africa
were at times officially called "Bantu" by the apartheid regime. The term Bantu is derived from the word for "people" common to many of the Bantu languages. The Oxford Dictionary of South African English
South African English
describes its contemporary usage in a racial context as "obsolescent and offensive" because of its strong association with white minority rule and the apartheid system. However, "Bantu" is used without pejorative connotations in other parts of Africa.Contents1 History 2 Son 3 Ethnic partitioning 4 Culture 5 Food
Food
acquisition 6 House types 7 LiteratureHistory[edit] At some stage after tertiary dispersal period a settlement at Great Zimbabwe was established as the capital of a trading empire. Around this time there is evidence of coastal trading with Arabs, with the South East Asian region, and even with China
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Globalization And World Cities Research Network
The Globalization
Globalization
and World Cities Research Network, commonly abbreviated to GaWC, is a think tank that studies the relationships between world cities in the context of globalization. It is based in the geography department of Loughborough University
Loughborough University
in Leicestershire, England, United Kingdom. GaWC was founded by Peter J. Taylor in 1998,[1] Together with Jon Beaverstock and Richard G. Smith, they create the GaWC's bi-annual categorization of world cities into "Alpha", "Beta" and "Gamma" tiers, based upon their international connectedness.[2] The GaWC examines cities worldwide to narrow them down to a roster of 307 world cities, then ranks these based on their connectivity through four "advanced producer services": accountancy, advertising, banking/finance, and law.[3] The GaWC inventory ranks city economics more heavily than political or cultural factors
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Metropolis
A metropolis (/mɪˈtrɒpəlɪs, -plɪs/)[2] is a large city or conurbation which is a significant economic, political, and cultural center for a country or region, and an important hub for regional or international connections, commerce, and communications. The term is Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
(μητρόπολις) and means the "mother city" of a colony (in the ancient sense), that is, the city which sent out settlers. This was later generalized to a city regarded as a center of a specified activity, or any large, important city in a nation. A big city belonging to a larger urban agglomeration, but which is not the core of that agglomeration, is not generally considered a metropolis but a part of it
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Province
A province is almost always an administrative division, within a country or state. The term derives from the ancient Roman provincia, which was the major territorial and administrative unit of the Roman Empire's territorial possessions outside Italy. The term province has since been adopted by many countries, and in those with no actual provinces, it has come to mean "outside the capital city". While some provinces were produced artificially by colonial powers, others were formed around local groups with their own ethnic identities. Many have their own powers independent of federal authority, especially in Canada
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American Dollar
 United States  East Timor[2][Note 1]  Ecuador[3][Note 2]  El Salvador[4]  Federated States of Micronesia  Marshall Islands  Palau  Panama[Note 3]  Zimbabwe[Note 4]3 non-U.S
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Human Development Index
The Human Development Index
Human Development Index
(HDI) is a statistic composite index of life expectancy, education, and per capita income indicators, which are used to rank countries into four tiers of human development. A country scores a higher HDI when the lifespan is higher, the education level is higher, and the gross national income GNI (PPP) per capita is higher
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Post-office Box
A post-office box or post office box (commonly referred to as a P.O. box or a postal box) is a uniquely addressable lockable box located on the premises of a post office station. In some regions, particularly in Africa, there is no 'door to door' delivery of mail, for example, in Kenya.[1] Consequently, renting a PO box has traditionally been the only way to receive mail in such countries. However, some, like Jordan, have introduced mail home delivery.[2] Generally, post office boxes are rented from the post office either by individuals or by businesses on a basis ranging from monthly to annual, and the cost of rent varies depending on the box size. Central business district (CBD) PO boxes are usually more expensive than rural PO boxes. In the United States, the rental rate used to be[when?] uniform across the country
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Time Zone
A time zone is a region of the globe that observes a uniform standard time for legal, commercial, and social purposes. Time
Time
zones tend to follow the boundaries of countries and their subdivisions because it is convenient for areas in close commercial or other communication to keep the same time. Most of the time zones on land are offset from Coordinated Universal Time
Time
(UTC) by a whole number of hours (UTC−12:00 to UTC+14:00), but a few zones are offset by 30 or 45 minutes (e.g. Newfoundland
Newfoundland
Standard Time
Time
is UTC−03:30, Nepal
Nepal
Standard Time
Time
is UTC+05:45, and Indian Standard Time
Time
is UTC+05:30). Some higher latitude and temperate zone countries use daylight saving time for part of the year, typically by adjusting local clock time by an hour
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Xhosa Language
Xhosa (/ˈkɔːsə, ˈkoʊsə/,[6][7][8] Xhosa pronunciation: [ˈǁʰɔsa]) is a Nguni Bantu language
Bantu language
with click consonants and is one of the official languages of South Africa.[9] It is also an official language of Zimbabwe.[10] Xhosa is spoken as a first language by approximately 8.2 million people and by another 11 million as a second language in South Africa, mostly in Eastern Cape
Eastern Cape
Province.[11] Like most other Bantu languages, Xhosa is a tonal language;[12] the same sequence of consonants and vowels can have different meanings, depending on intonation. Xhosa has two tones: high and low.[13] Xhosa is written with the Latin alphabet. Three letters are used to indicate the basic clicks: c for dental clicks, x for lateral clicks and q for post-alveolar clicks (for a more detailed explanation, see the table of consonant phonemes below)
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Afrikaans
Afrikaans
Afrikaans
(/ˌæfrɪˈkɑːns, ˌɑːfri-, -ˈkɑːnz/)[5][6] is a West Germanic language spoken in South Africa, Namibia
Namibia
and, to a lesser extent, Botswana
Botswana
and Zimbabwe. It evolved from the Dutch vernacular[7][8] of South Holland
South Holland
(Hollandic dialect)[9][10] spoken by the mainly Dutch settlers of what is now South Africa, where it gradually began to develop distinguishing characteristics in the course of the 18th century.[11] Hence, it is a daughter language of Dutch, and was previously referred to as "Cape Dutch" (a term also used to refer collectively to the early Cape settlers) or "kitchen Dutch" (a derogatory term used to refer to Afrikaans
Afrikaans
in its earlier days)
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South African English
South African English
South African English
(SAfrE, SAfrEng, SAE, en-ZA[1]) is the set of English dialects spoken by native South Africans.Contents1 History 2 Varieties 3 Phonetics 4 Lexicon4.1 History of SAE Dictionaries 4.2 Expressions5 Demographics 6 Examples of South African accents 7 See also 8 References 9 Bibliography 10 Further reading 11 External linksHistory[edit] British colonizers first introduced English to the South African region in 1795, when they established a military holding operation at the Cape
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[note 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation.[1] To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.[2]Contents1 History 2 Geodetic datum 3 Horizontal coordinates3.1 Latitude
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First Language
A first language, native language or mother/father/parent tongue (also known as arterial language or L1), is a language that a person has been exposed to from birth[1] or within the critical period. In some countries, the term native language or mother tongue refers to the language of one's ethnic group rather than one's first language.[2] Children brought up speaking more than one language can have more than one native language, and be bilingual or multilingual
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Coloureds
Coloureds
Coloureds
(Afrikaans: Kleurlinge) are a multiracial ethnic group native to Southern Africa
Southern Africa
who have ancestry from various populations inhabiting the region, including Khoisan, Bantu speakers, Afrikaners, and sometimes also Austronesians and South Asians. Because of the combination of ethnicities, different families and individuals have a variety of different physical features.[7][8] There were numerous relationships and unions among first, the Europeans and Africans, and later among either of those groups and persons from Asia. In the Western Cape, a distinctive Cape Coloured and affiliated Cape Malay
Cape Malay
culture developed. In other parts of Southern Africa, people classified as Coloured were usually the descendants of individuals from two distinct ethnicities
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