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Joe R. Lansdale
Joe Richard Lansdale (born October 28, 1951) is an American writer, author, martial arts expert, and martial arts instructor. Contents1 Career 2 Personal life 3 Film and television 4 Awards 5 Bibliography5.1 Original screenplays (TV)6 Adaptations 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksCareer[edit] Lansdale has written novels and stories in many genres, including Western, horror, science fiction, mystery, and suspense.[1][2] He has also written for comics as well as Batman: The Animated Series. He has written 45 novels and published 30 short story collections along with many chapbooks and comic book adaptations. Several of his novels have been adapted to film.[3] Frequent features of Lansdale's writing are usually deeply ironic, strange or absurd situations or characters, such as Elvis Presley
Elvis Presley
and John F. Kennedy
John F

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Sōke
Sōke (宗家), pronounced [soːke], is a Japanese term that means "the head family [house]."[1] In the realm of Japanese traditional arts, it is used synonymously with the term iemoto.[2] Thus, it is often used to indicate "headmaster" (or sometimes translated as "head of the family" or even "grand master".) The English translation of sōke as "grand master" is not a literal translation but it does see use by some Japanese sources. It can mean one who is the leader of any school or the master of a style, but it is most commonly used as a highest level Japanese title, referring to the singular leader of a school or style of martial art
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Graphic Novels
A graphic novel is a book made up of comics content. Although the word "novel" normally refers to long fictional works, the term "graphic novel" is applied broadly and includes fiction, non-fiction, and anthologized work
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Vietnam Veteran
A Vietnam veteran
Vietnam veteran
is someone who served in the armed forces of participating countries during the Vietnam War. The term has been used to describe veterans who were in the armed forces of South Vietnam, the United States
United States
armed forces, and countries allied to them, whether or not they were stationed in Vietnam during their service. However, the more common usage distinguishes between those who served "in country" and those who did not serve in Vietnam by referring to the "in country" veterans as "Vietnam veterans" and the others as "Vietnam-era veterans". The U.S
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Conscription
Military
Military
service National service Conscription
Conscription
crisis Conscientious objector Alternative civilian service Conscription
Conscription
by countryv t eConscription, sometimes called the draft, is the compulsory enlistment of people in a national service, most often a military service.[5] Conscription
Conscription
dates back to antiquity and continues in some countries to the present day under various names. The modern system of near-universal national conscription for young men dates to the French Revolution in the 1790s, where it became the basis of a very large and powerful military
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Novellas
A novella is a text of written, fictional, narrative prose normally longer than a short story but shorter than a novel, somewhere between 7,500 and 40,000 words. The English word "novella" derives from the Italian novella,[1] derived from nuovo, which means "new"
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Trade Paperbacks
A paperback is a type of book characterized by a thick paper or paperboard cover, and often held together with glue rather than stitches or staples. In contrast, hardcover or hardback books are bound with cardboard covered with cloth. The pages on the inside are made of paper. Inexpensive books bound in paper have existed since at least the 19th century in such forms as pamphlets, yellowbacks, dime novels, and airport novels.[1] Modern paperbacks can be differentiated by size. In the U.S., there are "mass-market paperbacks" and larger, more durable "trade paperbacks." In the U.K., there are A-format, B-format, and the largest C-format sizes.[2] Paperback
Paperback
editions of books are issued when a publisher decides to release a book in a low-cost format. Cheaper, lower quality paper; glued (rather than stapled or sewn) bindings; and the lack of a hard cover may contribute to the lower cost of paperbacks
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Vintage Crime/Black Lizard
Vintage, in winemaking, is the process of picking grapes and creating the finished product (see Harvest (wine)). A vintage wine is one made from grapes that were all, or primarily, grown and harvested in a single specified year. In certain wines, it can denote quality, as in Port wine, where Port houses make and declare vintage Port in their best years. From this tradition, a common, though incorrect, usage applies the term to any wine that is perceived to be particularly old or of a particularly high quality. Most countries allow a vintage wine to include a portion of wine that is not from the year denoted on the label. In Chile and South Africa, the requirement is 75% same-year content for vintage-dated wine.[1][2] In Australia, New Zealand, and the member states of the European Union, the requirement is 85%.[3][4][5] In the United States, the requirement is 85%, unless the wine is designated with an AVA, (e.g., Napa Valley), in which case it is 95%
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Mosaic Novel
A mosaic novel is a novel in which individual chapters or short stories share a common setting or set of characters with the aim of telling a linear story from beginning to end, with the individual chapters, however, refracting a plurality of viewpoints and styles. Examples include the Wild Cards series begun by George R. R. Martin, and the Thieves' World series of Robert Lynn Asprin
Robert Lynn Asprin
and others, which overtly used and may have coined the term "mosaic novel" for this practice of sharing a world and vision amongst several authors. French author Alfred Boudry often leads groups of English- and French-speaking writers in creating multiple narratives set in a common predetermined background. La Bibliothèque nomédienne was the first to be published (in 2008), dealing about a "misplaced continent" called Nomedia
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British Fantasy Award
The British Fantasy Awards are administered annually by the British Fantasy Society (BFS) and were first awarded in 1976. Prior to that they were known as The August Derleth
August Derleth
Fantasy Awards (see August Derleth Award). First awarded in 1972 (The Knight of Swords by Michael Moorcock) only for novels, the number of award categories increased and in 1976 the BFS renamed them collectively the British Fantasy Awards. The current award categories are Best Fantasy Novel (the Robert Holdstock
Robert Holdstock
Award), Best Horror Novel (the August Derleth
August Derleth
Award), Best Novella, Best Short Story, Best Independent Press, Best Artist, Best Anthology, Best Collection, Best Comic/Graphic Novel, Best Non-Fiction, and Best Newcomer (the Sydney J
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Stephen F. Austin State University
Stephen F. Austin
Stephen F. Austin
State University (SFA) is a public university located in Nacogdoches, Texas, United States. Founded as a teachers' college in 1923, the university was named after one of Texas's founding fathers, Stephen F. Austin. Its campus resides on part of the homestead of Thomas Jefferson Rusk. Stephen F. Austin
Stephen F. Austin
is one of four independent public universities in Texas
Texas
(i.e., those not affiliated with one of Texas's six university systems). Coordinates: 31°37′17″N 94°38′57″W / 31.62139°N 94.64917°W / 31.62139; -94.64917 Stephen F. Austin
Stephen F. Austin
State University is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees.[3] The Stephen F. Austin
Stephen F

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Mummy
A mummy is a deceased human or an animal whose skin and organs have been preserved by either intentional or accidental exposure to chemicals, extreme cold, very low humidity, or lack of air, so that the recovered body does not decay further if kept in cool and dry conditions. Some authorities restrict the use of the term to bodies deliberately embalmed with chemicals, but the use of the word to cover accidentally desiccated bodies goes back to at least 1615 AD (See the section Etymology and meaning). Mummies of humans and other animals have been found on every continent,[1] both as a result of natural preservation through unusual conditions, and as cultural artifacts
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Ancient Egypt
Ancient Egypt
Egypt
was a civilization of ancient Northeastern Africa, concentrated along the lower reaches of the Nile
Nile
River in the place that is now the country Egypt
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John F. Kennedy
President of the United StatesPresidencyTimeline1960 CampaignElectionInaugurationNew Frontier Foreign PolicyDoctrine"A Strategy of Peace" Bay of PigsCuban Missile Crisis Civil Rights AddressPartial Nuclear Test Ban TreatyClean Air Peace Corps"We choose to go to the Moon"Space programsMercury Gemini ApolloAppointmentsCabinet JudgesAssassination and legacyNovember 22, 1963 State Funeral Eternal Flame Memorials Library Legacy Cultural depictionsv t eJohn Fitzgerald "Jack" Kennedy (May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963), commonly referred to by his initials JFK, was an American politician who served as the 35th President of the United States
President of the United States
from January 1961 until his assassination in November 1963. Kennedy served at the height of the Cold War, and much of his presidency focused on managing relations with the Soviet Union
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Elvis Presley
Elvis
Elvis
Aaron Presley[a] (January 8, 1935 – August 16, 1977) was an American singer and actor. Regarded as one of the most significant cultural icons of the 20th century, he is often referred to as the "King of Rock and Roll" or simply "the King". Presley was born in Tupelo, Mississippi, and relocated to Memphis, Tennessee, with his family when he was 13 years old. His music career began there in 1954, recording at Sun Records
Sun Records
with producer Sam Phillips, who wanted to bring the sound of African American music
African American music
to a wider audience. Accompanied by guitarist Scotty Moore and bassist Bill Black, Presley was a pioneer of rockabilly, an uptempo, backbeat-driven fusion of country music and rhythm and blues. In 1955, drummer D. J. Fontana
D. J

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Chapbooks
A chapbook is a type of popular literature printed in early modern Europe. Produced cheaply, chapbooks were commonly small, paper-covered booklets, usually printed on a single sheet folded into books of 8, 12, 16 and 24 pages. They were often illustrated with crude woodcuts, which sometimes bore no relation to the text. When illustrations were included in chapbooks, they were considered popular prints. The tradition of chapbooks arose in the 16th century, as soon as printed books became affordable, and rose to its height during the 17th and 18th centuries. Many different kinds of ephemera and popular or folk literature were published as chapbooks, such as almanacs, children's literature, folk tales, ballads, nursery rhymes, pamphlets, poetry, and political and religious tracts. The term "chapbook" for this type of literature was coined in the 19th century. The corresponding French and German terms are bibliothèque bleue (blue book) and Volksbuch, respectively
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