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Joachim Du Bellay
Joachim du Bellay (also Joachim Du Bellay; French: [ʒoaʃɛ̃ dy bɛlɛ]; c
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Sperone Speroni
Sperone Speroni degli Alvarotti (1500–1588) was an Italian Renaissance humanist, scholar and dramatist
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Pierre De Ronsard
Pierre de Ronsard (11 September 1524 – 27 December 1585) was a French poet or, as his own generation in France called him, a "prince of poets".

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Renaissance
The Renaissance (UK: /rɪˈnsəns/ rin-AY-sənss, US: /ˈrɛnəsɑːns/ (About this soundlisten) REN-ə-sahnss) was a period in European history marking the transition from the Middle Ages to Modernity and covering the 15th and 16th centuries. In addition to the standard periodization, proponents of a long Renaissance put its beginning in the 14th century and its end in the 17th century
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Paris
Paris (French pronunciation: ​[paʁi] (About this soundlisten)) is the capital and most populous city of France, with a population of 2,148,271 residents (official estimate, 1 January 2020) in an area of 105 square kilometres (41 square miles). Since the 17th century, Paris has been one of Europe's major centres of finance, diplomacy, commerce, fashion, science and the arts
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Jean Daurat
Jean Daurat (Occitan: Joan Dorat; Latin: Auratus) (3 April 1508 – 1 November 1588) was a French poet, scholar and a member of a group known as The Pléiade.

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Jean-Antoine De Baïf
Jean Antoine de Baïf (19 February 1532 – 19 September 1589) was a French poet and member of the Pléiade.

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Latinist
Classical Latin is the modern term used to describe the form of the Latin language recognized as standard by writers of the late Roman Republic and the Roman Empire. In some later periods, it was regarded as "good" Latin, with later versions being viewed as debased or corrupt. The word Latin is now taken by default as meaning "Classical Latin", so that, for example, modern Latin textbooks describe Classical Latin. Marcus Tullius Cicero and his contemporaries of the late republic, while using lingua latina and sermo latinus to mean the Latin language as opposed to Greek or other languages, and sermo vulgaris or sermo vulgi to refer to the vernacular, referred to the speech they valued most and in which they wrote as latinitas, "Latinity", with the implication of good. Sometimes it was called sermo familiaris, "speech of the good families", sermo urbanus, "speech of the city" or rarely sermo nobilis, "noble speech"
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Clément Marot
Clément Marot (23 November 1496 – 12 September 1544) was a French poet of the Renaissance period.
Clément Marot.

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Mother Tongue
A first language, native language or mother/father/parent tongue (also known as arterial language or L1), is a language that a person has been exposed to from birth or within the critical period. In some countries, the term native language or mother tongue refers to the language of one's ethnic group rather than one's first language. Sometimes, the term "mother tongue" or "mother language" is used for the language that a person learned as a child at home (usually from their parents). Children growing up in bilingual homes can, according to this definition, have more than one mother tongue or native language. The first language of a child is part of that child's personal, social and cultural identity. Another impact of the first language is that it brings about the reflection and learning of successful social patterns of acting and speaking.

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Euripides
Euripides (/jʊəˈrɪpɪdz/ or /jɔːˈrɪpɪdz/; Greek: Εὐριπίδης; Ancient Greek: [eu̯.riː.pí.dɛːs]) (c. 480 – c. 406 BC) was a tragedian of classical Athens. Along with Aeschylus and Sophocles, he is one of the three ancient Greek tragedians for whom a significant number of plays have survived. Some ancient scholars attributed 95 plays to him but, according to the Suda, it was 92 at most. Of these, 18 or 19 have survived more or less complete (there has been debate about his authorship of Rhesus, largely on stylistic grounds) and there are also fragments, some substantial, of most of the other plays
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